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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
MOSCOW -- More than 100,000 Muscovites heeded democratic activists' call yesterday, pouring into the streets to denounce President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and to reject his referendum on preserving the Soviet Union.The crowds once again filled the broad square outside the Kremlin in the late-winter sunshine. They chanted their allegiance to Mr. Gorbachev's nemesis, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, cheered striking coal miners and decried the lies and decay of Communist rule."So-called socialism Is the opium of the people," one poster paraphrased Karl Marx's dictum on religion.
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NEWS
By Flora Lewis | October 2, 1990
ASSORTED hints have come from Moscow that the Soviets are willing to supply intelligence about Iraq. This could be of critical importance.Long and intimate involvement with the Iraqi military and police establishments, from the top well on down, gave Moscow information unavailable anywhere else.It is a reflection of the astonishing, still quite incomplete shift in SoFloraLewisviet-U.S. relations that Washington has reacted coolly.There are some valid reasons for caution.For one thing, there has been an energetic KGB campaign for nearly a year now to prettify a deservedly ugly image at home and abroad.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | December 18, 1991
Moscow EVERY DAY here is so full of fear and hope, rising and fading, HTC so many startling things happen so erratically, the present is so taut and the future so murky that life sometimes seems like the day itself -- cold, fogged over, too suddenly dark.The city and its people seemed hard and remote at first. Then I remembered the habit I had as a foreign correspondent -- trying to jump out of the limitations of my own head by thinking local. So I practice thinking like a Russian -- not masses of Russians but just one, say a teacher in a high school.
FEATURES
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 1996
MOSCOW -- When the creators of the new Russian "Sesame Street" first showed adults here episodes of technicolor muppets bounding around a highrise Moscow courtyard, they were not amused. In fact, they found the irrepressible behavior of the muppets impossible to understand.Few Russian parents would want their children to act like Zeliboba, Kubik or Busya, the stars of what is known here as "Ulitsa Sezam." Bouncing joy, mopey sadness, or bubbling curiosity are often grounds for punishment in a country that rears its children to be silent, still and spotless.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | July 23, 1992
Ted Turner's willingness to deal with the old Soviet Union when such ventures were not popular seems to be paying off.Turner Broadcasting System yesterday announced plans to build and program Moscow's first independent TV station, in cooperation with Russia's Moscow Independent Broadcasting Co. (MIBC). Programing would include CNN, classic films from the Turner library, National Geographic and Audubon Society programming, sports and children's shows, most dubbed into Russian.Revenues from advertising would be used to help develop Russian programming.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1994
MOSCOW -- Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov just keeps getting stronger and stronger.Yesterday, President Boris N. Yeltsin himself declared that Mr. Luzhkov was free to ignore the national government's policies on privatization. All of Russia might be going in one direction in the great post-Soviet sell-off -- but not Moscow.And privatization is only his most recent success. For six months Mr. Luzhkov has been asserting and extending his control over the city in different ways.In October he had the police drive away itinerant traders from the non-Russian fringes of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 25, 1993
MOSCOW -- It's a struggle trying to put together a real American Thanksgiving dinner here in the snow-swept capital of the former Evil Empire.There's the stuffing, for instance: Will it be Stove Top from the box or should we grab that box of Progresso bread crumbs and go for homemade?The cranberry sauce is a dilemma as well. We could go down to the market and get a huge $3 bag of juicy, fresh cranberries, but it would be so much more convenient just to pop open that can with the reassuring generic American label.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian democrats charged yesterday that unrepentant Communists, allies in Parliament and leaders of the failed 1991 coup masterminded the violent May Day clashes between demonstrators and police that wounded more than 200."It was a planned action prepared well in advance," said Vasily N. Feklunin, an Information Ministry official who witnessed the two-hour melee in the Moscow square named for cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.Mr. Feklunin said a "mobile attack unit" of young men with homemade weapons rushed from the ranks of the mostly elderly Communist and nationalist marchers and hurled themselves at the police.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 31, 1990
MOSCOW -- Moscow police bulldozers razed early yesterday morning a protesters' shantytown across from the Kremlin gates that since the summer had been a squalid symbol of this society's new freedom and frustrations.A police spokesman said 43 squatters were rousted at 2 a.m., loaded into buses and taken to a police holding center, where they would be given tickets to their home cities. Then bulldozers plowed the settlement into a snow-covered heap of cardboard boxes and sheet plastic, picket signs and abandoned belongings.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
MOSCOW -- A powerful explosion last night destroyed the headquarters of the Soviet Union's major anti-Communist opposition movement in what appeared to be the first political bombing in the capital in more than a decade.No one was injured in the blast, which occurred just after 10:20 p.m. in the old brick building occupied by Democratic Russia a few hundred yards from the Kremlin. One activist, Alexander Fonyakin, was in a back room at the time and leapt from a ground-floor window when the explosion occurred.
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