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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 26, 1997
Tchaikovsky, Trio in A minor (Opus 50), Rachmaninoff, Trio No. 1 in G minor, performed by the Moscow Conservatory Trio (CMH Records CD-8020); Beethoven, Trio in C minor (Opus, No. BTC 3), Brahms, Trio in B major (Opus 8), performed by the Moscow Conservatory Trio (CMH Records CD-8021).Few chamber music releases this year have given me as much pleasure as these discs from the Moscow Conservatory Trio.Shriver Hall Concert Series subscribers probably recall the concert last season in which the trio (pianist Paul Ostrovsky, violinist Dmitri Berlinsky and cellist Suren Bagratuni)
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW - Some of the world's most gifted young musicians are wearing overcoats to class and trying to read sheet music by window light after a fire roared through three classrooms at the venerable Moscow State Conservatory. As aspiring performers and composers took final exams this week, there was no electricity, limited telephone service and a trickle of heat from an emergency system. A week after the Dec. 17 blaze, 16 precious concert grand pianos sat damaged or destroyed. Bundles of canvas hoses still dangled from the stairwells, and the air stank of soot.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 5, 1996
If there exists a finer piano trio than the Moscow Conservatory Trio among the world's permanent chamber music groups, this listener is prepared to hear the evidence. Until it is forthcoming, however, he will have to accept the evidence of what he heard Sunday evening in the Shriver Hall Concert Series.The Moscow Conservatory Trio (pianist Paul Ostrovsky, violinist Dmitry Berlinsky and cellist Suren Bagratuni) performed Shostakovich's Trios Nos. 1 in C minor and 2 in E minor and Beethoven's Trio No. 6 in B-flat ("The Archduke")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1999
It's an irony that the Russian-born pianist Lilya Zilberstein should be making her local debut Thursday night at Temple Oheb Shalom in Pikesville.In her native land, Zilberstein's Jewishness could have at one time prevented her from achieving an international career. But in the early days of the Soviet Union's collapse, the Jewishness that blocked the door to Zilberstein's advancement paradoxically led her to the window of fame as one of the most important Russian pianists of her generation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1999
It's an irony that the Russian-born pianist Lilya Zilberstein should be making her local debut Thursday night at Temple Oheb Shalom in Pikesville.In her native land, Zilberstein's Jewishness could have at one time prevented her from achieving an international career. But in the early days of the Soviet Union's collapse, the Jewishness that blocked the door to Zilberstein's advancement paradoxically led her to the window of fame as one of the most important Russian pianists of her generation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 11, 1998
Alfred Schnittke was an uncommonly lucky composer.He lived most of his life in the former Soviet Union, a politically repressive regime in which his music was often blacklisted. That his father was a Latvian Jew, his mother a German Roman Catholic and that he himself was attracted to Buddhism led to a lifelong sense of rootlessness.The only people he could trust were other artists who suffered for some of the same reasons he did. He was haunted by death, not only because of his own poor health -- several heart attacks and massive strokes left him nearly paralyzed -- but also because many friends, relatives and colleagues disappeared, never to return, into the Soviet gulag.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 1998
When he left the Moscow Conservatory 10 years ago, Vladimir Viardo says, the attitude of the institution was: "Don't bother coming back."This year, he will be welcomed back with open arms."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | November 26, 1991
For music aficionados, no sword is as double-edged as the international performance competitions that occur with increasing frequency these days.The Van Cliburn Piano Competition, the Tchaikovsky, the Rubinstein, the Chopin -- everyone bemoans them. Dehumanizing marathons that reward stamina, not artistry, critics say. The technically assured, "play-it-safe" types win, while the genuine individualist losesout because stodgy old judges are offended by truly original playing.Yet few things titillate the music world more than a dazzling pianistic Olympiad, which is exactly what events like the Cliburn and the Tchaikovsky have become.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1998
One of the most interesting events of the current classical music season is about to pass us by almost unnoticed. It is a free concert this Sunday at 3 p.m. at Temple Oheb Shalom by the Kiev Camerata, with piano soloist Mykola Suk, conducted by Virko Baley.Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, is the birthplace of Russian culture. It has also always been an international city, with large ethnic German and Jewish populations. (Before World War I, Kiev's street signs were in Yiddish as well as Cyrillic lettering.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW - Some of the world's most gifted young musicians are wearing overcoats to class and trying to read sheet music by window light after a fire roared through three classrooms at the venerable Moscow State Conservatory. As aspiring performers and composers took final exams this week, there was no electricity, limited telephone service and a trickle of heat from an emergency system. A week after the Dec. 17 blaze, 16 precious concert grand pianos sat damaged or destroyed. Bundles of canvas hoses still dangled from the stairwells, and the air stank of soot.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1998
One of the most interesting events of the current classical music season is about to pass us by almost unnoticed. It is a free concert this Sunday at 3 p.m. at Temple Oheb Shalom by the Kiev Camerata, with piano soloist Mykola Suk, conducted by Virko Baley.Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, is the birthplace of Russian culture. It has also always been an international city, with large ethnic German and Jewish populations. (Before World War I, Kiev's street signs were in Yiddish as well as Cyrillic lettering.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 11, 1998
Alfred Schnittke was an uncommonly lucky composer.He lived most of his life in the former Soviet Union, a politically repressive regime in which his music was often blacklisted. That his father was a Latvian Jew, his mother a German Roman Catholic and that he himself was attracted to Buddhism led to a lifelong sense of rootlessness.The only people he could trust were other artists who suffered for some of the same reasons he did. He was haunted by death, not only because of his own poor health -- several heart attacks and massive strokes left him nearly paralyzed -- but also because many friends, relatives and colleagues disappeared, never to return, into the Soviet gulag.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 1998
When he left the Moscow Conservatory 10 years ago, Vladimir Viardo says, the attitude of the institution was: "Don't bother coming back."This year, he will be welcomed back with open arms."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 26, 1997
Tchaikovsky, Trio in A minor (Opus 50), Rachmaninoff, Trio No. 1 in G minor, performed by the Moscow Conservatory Trio (CMH Records CD-8020); Beethoven, Trio in C minor (Opus, No. BTC 3), Brahms, Trio in B major (Opus 8), performed by the Moscow Conservatory Trio (CMH Records CD-8021).Few chamber music releases this year have given me as much pleasure as these discs from the Moscow Conservatory Trio.Shriver Hall Concert Series subscribers probably recall the concert last season in which the trio (pianist Paul Ostrovsky, violinist Dmitri Berlinsky and cellist Suren Bagratuni)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 5, 1996
If there exists a finer piano trio than the Moscow Conservatory Trio among the world's permanent chamber music groups, this listener is prepared to hear the evidence. Until it is forthcoming, however, he will have to accept the evidence of what he heard Sunday evening in the Shriver Hall Concert Series.The Moscow Conservatory Trio (pianist Paul Ostrovsky, violinist Dmitry Berlinsky and cellist Suren Bagratuni) performed Shostakovich's Trios Nos. 1 in C minor and 2 in E minor and Beethoven's Trio No. 6 in B-flat ("The Archduke")
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | November 26, 1991
For music aficionados, no sword is as double-edged as the international performance competitions that occur with increasing frequency these days.The Van Cliburn Piano Competition, the Tchaikovsky, the Rubinstein, the Chopin -- everyone bemoans them. Dehumanizing marathons that reward stamina, not artistry, critics say. The technically assured, "play-it-safe" types win, while the genuine individualist losesout because stodgy old judges are offended by truly original playing.Yet few things titillate the music world more than a dazzling pianistic Olympiad, which is exactly what events like the Cliburn and the Tchaikovsky have become.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 31, 1996
The Moscow Conservatory Trio's program Sunday in the Shriver Hall Concert Series matches the greatest composer of chamber music in the 20th century with the greatest master of the 19th.The program's first half opens with Dmitry Shostakovich's early Trio No. 1 in C minor and follows with his mature masterpiece, the Trio No. 2 in E minor, perhaps the most tragic work in the piano trio literature. The program will close with Beethoven's Trio No. 6 in B-flat major ("The Archduke"), the longest, the most beautiful and the most life-affirming piano trio ever written.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler | December 29, 1996
The season of joy has passed, and the more somber season of review is upon us. In arts and entertainment, 1996 was marked by many a going (Horn & Horn lunchroom, Shakespeare on Wheels, the announcement of David Zinman's departure) and an important staying (the Lucas Collection). Bad guys (Jack Valenti with his Hollywood-friendly TV ratings system) were as likely to make news as angels (John Travolta in "Michael"), and personalities (the Michael Jackson marriage saga) got more attention than performances (Alanis Morissette's best-selling album)
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