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NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
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NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Moscow center offering useful work for former Soviet weapons scientists to prevent them from selling their skills abroad is on the way to starting in June, a key State Department official said yesterday.The $75 million International Science and Technology Center will serve as a sort of "dating service," matching scientists' knowledge with peaceful government and private-sector research projects.A high priority, said Robert Gallucci, the State Department official in charge of the project, will be research into nuclear-plant safety and management of nuclear waste.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 21, 2014
In 1978, Dr. Pauline Rose Clance described a pattern of fear she found among people who secretly believe they have climbed too high and will be found out at any moment. She called it "the impostor phenomenon. " It was, she wrote, a neurosis that exists in perfectionists who can never live up to their own high standards. Some men suffer from it, of course. But it reminds me of just about every woman I know, from the high-powered lawyer and lobbyist to the mom every other mother admires.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
NEWS
December 13, 1990
Imagine this situation: Secretary of State James Baker goes to Moscow, confers with Fidel Castro, restores full diplomatic relations with Cuba, works out an agreement on Angola, removes some of the last impediments to the START treaty and stops by to see Mikhail Gorbachev who revels in the two superpowers standing shoulder to shoulder in the Gulf crisis.Had this happened, which it did not, Mr. Baker's compatriots might wonder if he had moved Foggy Bottom to the banks of the Moskva River. But with appropriate variations, the above whirlwind pretty much describes how Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze ran Soviet diplomacy out of his hip pocket in Washington yesterday.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
A remarkable aspect of the Soviet Union's dissolution has been the generally bloodless and non-violent way in which the centralized government and the tightly controlled one-party system have been replaced by a fledgling democracy. Granted, there has been serious mayhem and bloodshed in Moldova, Armenia and Azerbaijan. But never before has a great empire become unglued as fast as in the former Soviet Union -- or as peacefully.This is worth noting because Russia, too, has its potential for violence.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | August 29, 1991
Dale Sprague has a grand plan to kick off the second 100 years of football at Western Maryland College: a game in Moscow."A college football team from the United States has never played in the Soviet Union, and we want to be the first," said Sprague, who's entering his sixth season as the Green Terrors' head coach. "We've got a proposed itinerary and some ideas to raise funds. If we can find the money, we're going."Sprague told The Carroll County Times of his plan last week, and in a team meeting Sunday got the overwhelming backing of his players.
NEWS
January 15, 1994
It is easy to see how President Clinton played so seemingly well in Moscow. Never before had Russians seen anything as polished as his mixture of high-level substance and showmanship. One minute he would sign arms agreements, another he would play the saxophone.Mikhail S. Gorbachev was able to charm Americans in the dying days of communism because he was seen as a different kind of a Russian. President Clinton achieved something similar in Moscow this week through his theatrics.After years of viewing aging U.S. presidents, the Russians saw Mr. Clinton projecting youth and vitality, an easy mixture of hype and seriousness.
NEWS
May 11, 1995
Perhaps the most intriguing words at the Moscow summit came not from Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin but from Secretary of State Warren Christopher. Having staked out a hard-line position against Russia's sale of two light-water nuclear reactors to Iran, warning Moscow there would be "consequences" if it went ahead, Mr. Christopher contended there had been "real progress."How so? He cited Mr. Yeltsin's agreement not to sell gas centrifuges to Iran for processing spent reactor fuel into weapons-grade plutonium.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
With Russian troops amassed along its border and Kremlin-backed separatists in control of major cities in eastern Ukraine, the government in Kiev is facing the gravest threat to its survival since the breakup of the former Soviet Union a generation ago. Unless the U.S. and its allies can convince Russian President Vladimir Putin to step back from using the unrest there as a pretext for military intervention, it looks more likely than ever that eastern...
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The seizure of the Crimea region of southern Ukraine by Russian troops over the weekend has created the most serious crisis in Europe since Moscow's 2008 incursion into Georgia, which led to the effective dismemberment and annexation of parts of that former Soviet republic. President Barack Obama was right to warn Russian president Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a price for attempting a similar territorial grab in Ukraine, but in order to make that threat credible he must use all the diplomatic tools at his disposal to convince America's European allies to speak with one voice in condemning Russia's dangerous military adventurism and flagrant violation of international norms while avoiding an escalation of the crisis that could lead to armed conflict.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
Despite President Obama's campaign pledge to "push the reset button" on U.S. relations with Russia, America's dealings with its erstwhile Cold War adversary recently have been anything but smooth. Moscow and Washington clashed last year over Russia's offer of temporary asylum to Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents to the media. Russia has been at best a reluctant partner in U.S. efforts to resolve the conflict in Syria and negotiate a halt to Iran's nuclear program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Even people who ordinarily find ballet a tough nut to crack can find themselves falling for the charms of "The Nutcracker. " Set to an ear worm-filled score by Tchaikovsky, the ballet tells a Christmas Eve story of childhood and fantasy, toys and sweets, snow and sentiment. As much an annual holiday tradition as Handel's "Messiah," the ballet is presented by companies of every size and level all over the country. Two large-sized productions are on the local calendar this weekend.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2013
A daredevil and two dissidents are piquing online readers' interest this morning as Edward Snowden, Nelson Mandela and Nik Wallenda all make the news again. Welcome to your post-weekend trends report for June 24, 2013. Nik Wallenda, who teetered his way over Baltimore's Inner Harbor last year, took on a much larger task as he crossed the Grand Canyon on a high wire. A similarly precarious bit of footwork appears to be underway in Moscow (or maybe Cuba ), as constitutional activist and former Marylander Edward Snowden is reported by several media outlets to have left Hong Kong for Russia.
NEWS
February 19, 1991
With its exquisitely timed peace plan to head off an allied ground assault against Iraq, the Soviet Union seeks to distance itself from the United States, play a major role in postwar Middle East affairs, refurbish its image among the Muslim masses and placate Communists unhappy with the Kremlin's rebuff to its old allies in Baghdad.The Bush administration may have mixed feelings about the Soviet intervention, coming at a time when weather conditions and force readiness are near optimum levels for launching a ground war. But if Mr. Hussein accepts the Soviet demand that he withdraw unconditionally from Kuwait, the savings in American lives would compensate a hundred times over for any losses in the diplomatic power game.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
MOSCOW -- More than 100,000 Muscovites heeded democratic activists' call yesterday, pouring into the streets to denounce President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and to reject his referendum on preserving the Soviet Union.The crowds once again filled the broad square outside the Kremlin in the late-winter sunshine. They chanted their allegiance to Mr. Gorbachev's nemesis, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, cheered striking coal miners and decried the lies and decay of Communist rule."So-called socialism Is the opium of the people," one poster paraphrased Karl Marx's dictum on religion.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin is scheduled to meet Thursday with the family of a Russian lawyer whose death sparked an international outcry over human rights in that country, renewing focus on a controversy that has complicated U.S.-Russian relations at a sensitive time. The meeting with the widow, mother and son of Sergei Magnitsky — who died in a Russian jail in 2009 after exposing corruption in the Russian government — comes just days after the State Department released a list of Russian officials barred from obtaining U.S. visas over alleged human rights abuses.
NEWS
By Neil H. Simon | December 12, 2012
This month's passage of a new U.S.-Russia trade law has done more than showcase Senator Ben Cardin's dedication to international human rights. By sending the shock to the Kremlin - that the U.S. values prosecuting rights abusers as much as it values profits for businesses - the Maryland Democrat has catapulted human rights atop the international agenda and brought new attention to the U.S. Helsinki Commission that he chairs. The Helsinki Commission - founded amid the Cold War, just like the legislation the new trade bill replaces - once helped secure freedom for Soviet refuseniks unable to emigrate from under the thumb of Communism.
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