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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
U.S. Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in Baltimore on the 28th stop in a 30-city road show, said Maryland businesses must be prepared to export their goods and services in the global market.Mosbacher and representatives of five other federal agencies have been traveling around the country telling small- and medium-sized businesses about programs that are available to help them export their products. They say the global market will offer a way for American companies to maintain or increase sales despite a slump in the domestic economy.
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By Jill Gerston and Jill Gerston,Contributing Writer | October 2, 1993
Georgette Mosbacher insists she's an Unremarkable Woman. Really."I am not at all remarkable," she says, perched on the sofa in the pale yellow drawing room of her Upper East Side townhouse office. "I grew up in a one-parent family. I worked my way through college, I had very average grades and I was very average looking, but I've lived a remarkable life only because I believed I could."This unshakable belief in self coupled with a driving ambition -- think Judith Krantz heroine and you've got the idea -- is what Ms. Mosbacher calls her "feminine force."
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NEWS
By Kathleen Beeman and Kathleen Beeman,Special to The Sun James Bock of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | July 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. refused yesterday to adjust the 1990 census results despite an acknowledged undercount, --ing the hopes of large cities and some states for a boost in federal aid and political clout.Mr. Mosbacher's decision, precipitated by a court order, affects about $59 billion in aid allocated annually on the basis of census numbers. It also could affect the makeup of congressional, state and local legislative districts.The Census Bureau said about 5.3 million Americans were missed in the 248.7 million total.
NEWS
By Keith Bradsher and Keith Bradsher,New York Times News Service | December 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. yesterday became the first administration official to say publicly that Japan was partly to blame for the lingering recession in the United States.Mr. Mosbacher's comments are especially significant because he will head President Bush's re-election campaign next year and serve as chief fund-raiser. The remarks came as Mr. Bush prepared to leave today on a trip to Japan and three other Asian countries that will focus on trade issues.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 7, 1991
TOKYO -- In the Bush administration's most ambitiou attempt to lead U.S. exporters to success here, Secretary of Commerce Robert S. Mosbacher last week escorted executives of 20 U.S. companies to show them the kind of commitment it takes to "compete more effectively in Japan."The companies were selected from 128 candidates after passing strict tests of "their commitment to the Japanese market," Mr. Mosbacher said.The three-day mission was supposed to give the CEOs chances to meet with everyone from Japan's powerful Minister of International Trade and Industry to companies that might be potential customers.
NEWS
By Keith Bradsher and Keith Bradsher,New York Times News Service | December 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. yesterday became the first administration official to say publicly that Japan was partly to blame for the lingering recession in the United States.Mr. Mosbacher's comments are especially significant because he will head President Bush's re-election campaign next year and serve as chief fund-raiser. The remarks came as Mr. Bush prepared to leave today on a trip to Japan and three other Asian countries that will focus on trade issues.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's choice for commerce secretary, Barbara H. Franklin, will inherit an agency diminished by its loss of primacy over international trade and somewhat weakened by the management style of its current leader, Robert A. Mosbacher.Mosbacher, who will leave next month to head the president's re-election campaign, has played a limited role in interagency debates on issues like tax and health policy and international trade.Unlike his combative predecessor, Malcolm Baldrige, he has spent much time jetting around the world on trade missions with the nation's corporate elite, seeking to open new markets for American exports.
NEWS
July 17, 1991
Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher has decided not adjust the census count, a decision that mayors say will cost cities millions. Statisticians have said the census missed about 5.3 million Americans. Mosbacher said he preferred to stick to tradition and not adjust the figures based on statistics. What do you think? Should the census numbers be adjusted, or not? Were you counted, or not?The call is local and must be made from a touch tone phone. The SUNDIAL number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Kuwaiti government paid more than $66,000 to fly Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher Sr., his wife and aides to Kuwait City in early March to view the destruction of that country in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, according to reports made public yesterday.The trip to Kuwait was just one of more than 30 trips -- both foreign and domestic -- that Mr. Mosbacher has taken over the past 2 1/2 years at the expense of foreign governments or U.S. corporations.Although President Bush persuaded Congress two years ago to permit all top administration officials to travel at the expense of private corporations, Mr. Mosbacher, a multimillionaire, far exceeds any other Cabinet officer in using this privilege.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
Mayor Kurt Schmoke has directed the city to join a lawsuit seeking an adjustment in the 1990 census, charging that the federal government had political motives for not raising the population count.Schmoke said yesterday that city lawyers are moving to have Baltimore join the lawsuit filed by New York City and 31 other cities, states, organizations and individuals. The suit, which seeks a court order to adjust the census count, is pending in federal court in New York."I had been reluctant to join the suit, thinking that it would be better to work with the Census Bureau," Schmoke said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's choice for commerce secretary, Barbara H. Franklin, will inherit an agency diminished by its loss of primacy over international trade and somewhat weakened by the management style of its current leader, Robert A. Mosbacher.Mosbacher, who will leave next month to head the president's re-election campaign, has played a limited role in interagency debates on issues like tax and health policy and international trade.Unlike his combative predecessor, Malcolm Baldrige, he has spent much time jetting around the world on trade missions with the nation's corporate elite, seeking to open new markets for American exports.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
U.S. Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in Baltimore on the 28th stop in a 30-city road show, said Maryland businesses must be prepared to export their goods and services in the global market.Mosbacher and representatives of five other federal agencies have been traveling around the country telling small- and medium-sized businesses about programs that are available to help them export their products. They say the global market will offer a way for American companies to maintain or increase sales despite a slump in the domestic economy.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | September 15, 1991
Washington -- Black, Hispanic, homeless and other under-represented Americans are going to be more under-represented once last year's census has its full impact on congressional and legislative redistricting and the parceling out of federal funds. It doesn't have to be that way, but that's how the Bush administration wants it.Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher does not deny that the census missed some 5.3 million people. But he refused in July to adjust official figures to make up for the undercount, which is highest in big Democratic cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
Mayor Kurt Schmoke has directed the city to join a lawsuit seeking an adjustment in the 1990 census, charging that the federal government had political motives for not raising the population count.Schmoke said yesterday that city lawyers are moving to have Baltimore join the lawsuit filed by New York City and 31 other cities, states, organizations and individuals. The suit, which seeks a court order to adjust the census count, is pending in federal court in New York."I had been reluctant to join the suit, thinking that it would be better to work with the Census Bureau," Schmoke said.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | July 21, 1991
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher refused this week to ''abandon a 200-year tradition of how we actually count people.''But the U.S. census will never be the same.The federal government spent $2.6 billion on the 1990 census and wound up with a result about as popular as an infectious disease. In fact, a top official of the Census Bureau's parent agency likened the census to cancer.''We've known about cancer for a long time and still can't cure it. This is not a whole lot easier problem,'' said Michael Darby, assistant secretary of commerce.
NEWS
July 17, 1991
Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher has decided not adjust the census count, a decision that mayors say will cost cities millions. Statisticians have said the census missed about 5.3 million Americans. Mosbacher said he preferred to stick to tradition and not adjust the figures based on statistics. What do you think? Should the census numbers be adjusted, or not? Were you counted, or not?The call is local and must be made from a touch tone phone. The SUNDIAL number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | July 21, 1991
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher refused this week to ''abandon a 200-year tradition of how we actually count people.''But the U.S. census will never be the same.The federal government spent $2.6 billion on the 1990 census and wound up with a result about as popular as an infectious disease. In fact, a top official of the Census Bureau's parent agency likened the census to cancer.''We've known about cancer for a long time and still can't cure it. This is not a whole lot easier problem,'' said Michael Darby, assistant secretary of commerce.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | September 15, 1991
Washington -- Black, Hispanic, homeless and other under-represented Americans are going to be more under-represented once last year's census has its full impact on congressional and legislative redistricting and the parceling out of federal funds. It doesn't have to be that way, but that's how the Bush administration wants it.Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher does not deny that the census missed some 5.3 million people. But he refused in July to adjust official figures to make up for the undercount, which is highest in big Democratic cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Kathleen Beeman and Kathleen Beeman,Special to The Sun James Bock of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | July 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. refused yesterday to adjust the 1990 census results despite an acknowledged undercount, --ing the hopes of large cities and some states for a boost in federal aid and political clout.Mr. Mosbacher's decision, precipitated by a court order, affects about $59 billion in aid allocated annually on the basis of census numbers. It also could affect the makeup of congressional, state and local legislative districts.The Census Bureau said about 5.3 million Americans were missed in the 248.7 million total.
NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Kuwaiti government paid more than $66,000 to fly Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher Sr., his wife and aides to Kuwait City in early March to view the destruction of that country in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, according to reports made public yesterday.The trip to Kuwait was just one of more than 30 trips -- both foreign and domestic -- that Mr. Mosbacher has taken over the past 2 1/2 years at the expense of foreign governments or U.S. corporations.Although President Bush persuaded Congress two years ago to permit all top administration officials to travel at the expense of private corporations, Mr. Mosbacher, a multimillionaire, far exceeds any other Cabinet officer in using this privilege.
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