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NEWS
February 26, 2004
A SOCIAL REVOLUTION appears to be overtaking the nation in fits and starts that may one day result in broad acceptance of gay marriage. Judges in Massachusetts. The mayor of Chicago. A county clerk in New Mexico. Local officials all over the country, including Maryland, trying to cope with hundreds of gay newlyweds coming home from disputed City Hall ceremonies in San Francisco. All form a mosaic of change under way in one of our most deeply held traditions. The notion is still troubling to many, perhaps most Americans, some of whom are deeply offended on religious grounds because they believe homosexuality is a sin. Yet, attitudes toward gays appear to be shifting so rapidly - just a few years after comedian Ellen DeGeneres took a risky step out of the closet, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy has a big following on network television - that political and legal institutions aren't likely to be far behind.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
More than a few East Coast buildings contain a Tiffany stained-glass window or two. But one structure in Baltimore can boast much more - a complete interior created by the famed designer, Louis Comfort Tiffany. St. Mark's Lutheran Church on St. Paul Street is considered such an exceptional example of Tiffany's work that it has been recommended for designation as a Baltimore landmark. Only one other city building - the Senator Theatre - has an interior that was singled out for landmark status.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
A mosaic of multi-colored flowers spilling out of a silvery vase fills a wall at the entry to the new Green House Residences at Stadium Place in the city. Tiles of varying hues and textures form a perky yellow sunflower, a brilliant red rose, delicate pink blossoms and splashes of green and lilac. When Gina Rozier last saw the piece, it was a jumble of glass, granite and stones. Rozier, who will be working in the four-story senior-care center, was one of about 100 volunteers who put the mosaic together over the past several months.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
A mosaic of multi-colored flowers spilling out of a silvery vase fills a wall at the entry to the new Green House Residences at Stadium Place in the city. Tiles of varying hues and textures form a perky yellow sunflower, a brilliant red rose, delicate pink blossoms and splashes of green and lilac. When Gina Rozier last saw the piece, it was a jumble of glass, granite and stones. Rozier, who will be working in the four-story senior-care center, was one of about 100 volunteers who put the mosaic together over the past several months.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2000
MANOR WOODS Elementary came up with an unusual and artistic way to commemorate this year's reading incentive program. A mosaic mural was created, and it will hang permanently in the school's foyer. The 2-by-13-foot mosaic, "Brilliant Path, Bright Future," consists of small, square, opaque glass tiles, with four larger tiles in each corner. It shows the school and surrounding land. A brown-and-gray tile road runs through the artwork to represent time changing: The dirt road changes to a paved road.
FEATURES
By GINA MARIA CARUSO | April 17, 1994
Is Baltimore a good place for artists? Painter Richard Sober thinks so. "Baltimore is a great place to work, because there aren't that many distractions," he says. "It's a small town and, in a way, it's a backwater. I mean that as a compliment."San Francisco and Spain are just some of the places the 41-year-old Mr. Sober has lived, but he always finds his way back to Baltimore, his hometown."It's an intimate city, and it takes a long time to know it. It's still a working-class town, and will always be one," he says.
NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | December 10, 1993
Check out the new mosaics at the Savage library's display case. Once again the fine artists from Forest Ridge Elementary, under the able direction of Roberta Laric, have enlivened this public space. Look for the gold and silver boxes by Kyle Theil and Shannon Tims, the purple box by Crystal Fitzgerald and the house-shaped box by Christine Tran. Keewna Lee and Liz Bartlett used sequins and old buttons to transform boxes of their own. The students also decorated items other than boxes. Check out Jane Pall's gilded fashion doll, cavorting on a full-sized roller skate.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A trio of girls skipped around a new mosaic sculpture they helped to make outside Govans Elementary School and wondered aloud if it would last longer than the ancient society best known for the art form. "Mr. Spoon said it's going to last forever," Moravia Lindsay, 9, said. With the help of Bryant "Spoon" Smith, an artist-in-residence sent to the North Baltimore public school by the Baltimore Museum of Art, Moravia and others had built a shiny stone artwork taller than they are, using the same technique as in Antioch.
FEATURES
By Dana Hull and Dana Hull,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - One television monitor shows CNN with its "Showdown Iraq" logo. On another, an anchor on Lebanon's Al-Manar TV, a privately owned station controlled by the fundamentalist movement Hezbollah, talks about diplomatic wrangling at the United Nations. On a third screen, a Baghdad correspondent from the United Arab Emirates' Abu Dhabi TV gives a live report. They're all playing on a bank of monitors at WorldLink TV, a nonprofit network based in San Francisco that makes news broadcasts from the Arab world and Israel available to satellite TV subscribers in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | May 22, 2008
Few high-end clubs reinvent themselves as fast as Mosaic. In two years, Mosaic has gone from an outdoor tent lounge in Power Plant Live's plaza to a million-dollar indoor club in the old BAR Baltimore space. And late last year, the owners cleaned house -- replacing general manager LG Concannon with Vincent Martinez, expanding the interior and retooling the musical lineup. It reopened in March. But for all the money, time and effort spent on Mosaic's newest incarnation, the club is under- whelming at best.
MOBILE
November 9, 2011
Charm City isn't known for fashion-magazine looks. The mix of grit and hipster style has never fostered snooty dress codes. But if you want to see and be seen, we've scouted out Baltimore neighborhoods -- bars, restaurants, gyms, the farmers market and more -- to provide a guide to turning heads when you're out and about. Mosaic 4 Market Place, Downtown. mosaic-baltimore.com Lindsay Lohan, Samantha Ronson, Ray Lewis, Michael Phelps and Pauly D from "The Jersey Shore" have all partied at this club.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
With a few shards of glass, tile and other discarded bits, Loring Cornish can re-create his world into a shimmering mosaic wonderland.  After growing up in Reservoir Hill and studying at Morgan State University, he has established himself as an artist, though not one who's conventionally trained. His distinct style and passion for mosaics is always visible - his own two rowhouses in Reservoir Hill are covered with multi-colored tiles and glass shards.  Cornish's work has appeared in shows and museums across the country, including the American Visionary Art Museum and the Jewish Museum of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
(Update : Looks like Michael Lohan doesn't have a place in Baltimore to promote "Celebrity Rehab 5" after all. Mosaic, where he had been scheduled to appear with Octomom Nadya Suleman abruptly canceled the event Tuesday, said spokesman and general manager Vincent Martinez. Goodlife Boys, which was promoting the event, also backed out Tuesday.) Michael Lohan will promote his stint on "Celebrity Rehab 5" with, what else, a party at a Baltimore club. Call it another success story for the addiction show and Dr. Drew Pinsky's counsel.  A rep for Lohan said the tabloid nuisance isn't actually in recovery because he didn't go on the show for alcohol or drug addiction treatment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Timonium-based mental health service provider Mosaic Community Services said it will merge with another provider, the North Baltimore Center, as of Thursday and expand its reach into Baltimore City from surrounding counties. The merger gives the providers a combined client base of 20,000 a year, staff of more than 700 and budget of about $36 million. The move by the two, both affiliates of Sheppard Pratt Health System Inc., will allow better management of programs and finances, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2008
Finding Beauty in a Broken World by Terry Tempest Williams Pantheon Books / $26 / 416 pages Renaissance art, endangered prairie dogs and Rwandan genocide are the compelling triptych in Terry Tempest Williams' quest to piece together the shards of a fractured and fractious world and find meaning within the broken bits. Finding Beauty in a Broken World is a meditation on what in Yiddish is called tikkun olam - repairing the world. Williams repeatedly pairs violence and beauty in escalating examples while positing that beauty's healing grace can resonate in the darkest of places, be it a dying ecosystem in the Southwest desert or in a nation recovering from genocidal mass murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | May 22, 2008
Few high-end clubs reinvent themselves as fast as Mosaic. In two years, Mosaic has gone from an outdoor tent lounge in Power Plant Live's plaza to a million-dollar indoor club in the old BAR Baltimore space. And late last year, the owners cleaned house -- replacing general manager LG Concannon with Vincent Martinez, expanding the interior and retooling the musical lineup. It reopened in March. But for all the money, time and effort spent on Mosaic's newest incarnation, the club is under- whelming at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2004
Just as our weather heats up, Baltimore has a new place to be cool -- in a manner of speaking. Mosaic, a covered outdoor lounge, opens tonight at Power Plant Live! The Cordish Co. V.P. Reed Cordish says the concept is that of a sophisticated hotspot -- along the lines of the Shore Club or the Delano in Miami's South Beach or the Sky Bar in Los Angeles. You'll find Mosaic at the front entrance to Power Plant Live! under a large stretched-canvas roof. Underneath, there are groupings of couches and ottomans -- real furniture where you can loll as cocktail servers take your orders from Mosaic's extensive martini list and a whole passel of champagnes and wines by the glass.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | May 18, 2008
LAST YEAR, WHEN THE OWNERS OF Mosaic in Power Plant Live wanted to retool the high-end lounge, they tapped Vincent Martinez for the job. Martinez, a Texas native who managed the Mosaic in Houston, moved to Baltimore in December and oversaw Mosaic's expansion and reopening in March. He now runs the club's daily operations. Martinez lives in Butchers Hill. 1 A six pack "No, not of Natty Boh or Yuengling, but the one I lost because I've been drinking too much of the other kind. It's swimsuit season!
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | December 20, 2007
Winter white The lowdown -- Mark the changing of the seasons at Mosaic Lounge's Winter White Solstice Celebration on Saturday. House music by DJ Lovegrove and Adam Auburn is on the menu, as are performances by aerial acrobats, stilt-walkers and others, courtesy of the Mad Hatter. Partygoers can enjoy drink specials all evening, and those wearing "winter white" will also receive a free mix CD from Lovegrove and Auburn. If you go -- The 21-and-older party runs 9 p.m.-2 a.m. at Mosaic, 4 Market Place.
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