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By John Dorsey | January 6, 1993
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, one of Baltimore's leadin commercial art galleries, will move from its present location at 1006 Morton St. to downtown Charles Street in March.Gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis said yesterday that his new space would be on Charles Street but that he couldn't confirm an exact location because negotiations were continuing.The Mitchell Baker Galerie will be vacating Grimaldis' former site at 523 N. Charles St. at the end of January, and there is speculation that Grimaldis would move there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When 12-year-old Leilani Hines wanted to fly away to Neverland, she just had to close her eyes, point her toes, curve one arm above her head, and picture herself springing above the ground in the ballet move known as a grand jete. In her imagination, Leilani soared to that magical land above the floodwaters that destroyed the Morton Street Dance Center on April 30. It was a refuge from her worries that costumes, which had to be ordered 12 weeks in advance, were mud-splattered and ruined.
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NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 1998
Last year, Morton Street Dance Center found that its annual spring concert was overflowing its banks. There were simply too many children in too many groups for its co-directors to maintain order backstage.So the Baltimore dance studio and performance company decided on an open space policy. It moved to the Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts in Columbia, which worked out so well that Morton Street will repeat the experience for this year's spring concert, which is Saturday."We needed to have the space where we could keep tabs on everybody," said Stephanie Powell, co-founder of the dance center with Magira Ross and Donna Jacobs.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon this weekend will contribute to congestion and delays for commuters in the city this weekend, as multiple road and lane closures are and will be in effect through Monday, according to city transportation officials. The festival, which features hundreds of authors and book signings as well as more than 100 exhibitors and booksellers, runs from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Residents and commuters are urged to plan ahead.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel and John Dorsey | July 12, 1991
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, the city's most prominent commercial art gallery and a fixture on Charles Street for nearly a decade and a half, is moving out of its location at 523 N. Charles St. after this month and will consolidate its exhibitions at the 1006 Morton St. location it opened 19 months ago."It no longer makes sense to have two spaces in Baltimore in this economy," said gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis, who has operated his gallery at 523 N. Charles St. for the past five years and at 928 N. Charles St. for nine years before that.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
Three Baltimore men pleaded innocent yesterday to the killing of City Cafe co-owner John Patrick Darda, who was shot in February during a botched robbery attempt. Lawyers for the men, Kion Marcus Eason, 20; his brother Jamaha Eason, 17, known as Jamal; and Derrick Bernard Quarles, 20, entered their pleas during an arraignment in Baltimore Circuit Court. Relatives of the victim and of the accused men filled much of the courtroom. Some people cried as they left. Although Jamaha Eason has been identified as the shooter, all three men are accused of first-degree murder.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
The developer who attempted last year to raze four historic carriage houses in Mount Vernon to make way for condominiums is back with new ideas for Morton Street. Developer Howard Chambers would still demolish one of the four diminutive buildings he owns along the alley, and the rear portions of two others. But, acknowledging the overwhelming public criticism of his initial plan, he would save all of a fourth structure and build about 30 condos above it all. "I would call it a preservation project with a residential addition," Chambers said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
A co-owner of a coffeehouse in Mount Vernon was shot in the head and killed yesterday, apparently in a daylight robbery as he walked to a bank to deposit the morning receipts, city police said. John P. Darda, 43, lived in Bel Air with his wife and three children. He was part-owner of the City Cafe, a popular meeting place for students, bankers, artisans, florists and attorneys who make Mount Vernon an eclectic midtown neighborhood. "He was just a businessman doing his job," said Frank Cooper, a maintenance worker at the cafe building who talked with Darda almost daily.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon this weekend will contribute to congestion and delays for commuters in the city this weekend, as multiple road and lane closures are and will be in effect through Monday, according to city transportation officials. The festival, which features hundreds of authors and book signings as well as more than 100 exhibitors and booksellers, runs from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Residents and commuters are urged to plan ahead.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 14, 2011
Orem "Jerry" Wahl, the co-owner of a Mount Vernon framing shop who was a theater first-nighter, died of a heart attack Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 73. Pat Moran, a friend and film casting agent, said he was stricken while in the lobby of his home, the St. Paul at Chase condominium. Born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore, he was a 1955 Patterson High School graduate. As a child he was a drum major and performed in local theater. Friends said he spent his childhood weekend afternoons at the old State Theatre on East Monument Street where vaudeville acts played alongside films.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 14, 2011
Orem "Jerry" Wahl, the co-owner of a Mount Vernon framing shop who was a theater first-nighter, died of a heart attack Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 73. Pat Moran, a friend and film casting agent, said he was stricken while in the lobby of his home, the St. Paul at Chase condominium. Born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore, he was a 1955 Patterson High School graduate. As a child he was a drum major and performed in local theater. Friends said he spent his childhood weekend afternoons at the old State Theatre on East Monument Street where vaudeville acts played alongside films.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
The developer who attempted last year to raze four historic carriage houses in Mount Vernon to make way for condominiums is back with new ideas for Morton Street. Developer Howard Chambers would still demolish one of the four diminutive buildings he owns along the alley, and the rear portions of two others. But, acknowledging the overwhelming public criticism of his initial plan, he would save all of a fourth structure and build about 30 condos above it all. "I would call it a preservation project with a residential addition," Chambers said.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
Three Baltimore men pleaded innocent yesterday to the killing of City Cafe co-owner John Patrick Darda, who was shot in February during a botched robbery attempt. Lawyers for the men, Kion Marcus Eason, 20; his brother Jamaha Eason, 17, known as Jamal; and Derrick Bernard Quarles, 20, entered their pleas during an arraignment in Baltimore Circuit Court. Relatives of the victim and of the accused men filled much of the courtroom. Some people cried as they left. Although Jamaha Eason has been identified as the shooter, all three men are accused of first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
A co-owner of a coffeehouse in Mount Vernon was shot in the head and killed yesterday, apparently in a daylight robbery as he walked to a bank to deposit the morning receipts, city police said. John P. Darda, 43, lived in Bel Air with his wife and three children. He was part-owner of the City Cafe, a popular meeting place for students, bankers, artisans, florists and attorneys who make Mount Vernon an eclectic midtown neighborhood. "He was just a businessman doing his job," said Frank Cooper, a maintenance worker at the cafe building who talked with Darda almost daily.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 1998
Last year, Morton Street Dance Center found that its annual spring concert was overflowing its banks. There were simply too many children in too many groups for its co-directors to maintain order backstage.So the Baltimore dance studio and performance company decided on an open space policy. It moved to the Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts in Columbia, which worked out so well that Morton Street will repeat the experience for this year's spring concert, which is Saturday."We needed to have the space where we could keep tabs on everybody," said Stephanie Powell, co-founder of the dance center with Magira Ross and Donna Jacobs.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | January 6, 1993
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, one of Baltimore's leadin commercial art galleries, will move from its present location at 1006 Morton St. to downtown Charles Street in March.Gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis said yesterday that his new space would be on Charles Street but that he couldn't confirm an exact location because negotiations were continuing.The Mitchell Baker Galerie will be vacating Grimaldis' former site at 523 N. Charles St. at the end of January, and there is speculation that Grimaldis would move there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When 12-year-old Leilani Hines wanted to fly away to Neverland, she just had to close her eyes, point her toes, curve one arm above her head, and picture herself springing above the ground in the ballet move known as a grand jete. In her imagination, Leilani soared to that magical land above the floodwaters that destroyed the Morton Street Dance Center on April 30. It was a refuge from her worries that costumes, which had to be ordered 12 weeks in advance, were mud-splattered and ruined.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel and John Dorsey | July 12, 1991
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, the city's most prominent commercial art gallery and a fixture on Charles Street for nearly a decade and a half, is moving out of its location at 523 N. Charles St. after this month and will consolidate its exhibitions at the 1006 Morton St. location it opened 19 months ago."It no longer makes sense to have two spaces in Baltimore in this economy," said gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis, who has operated his gallery at 523 N. Charles St. for the past five years and at 928 N. Charles St. for nine years before that.
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