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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 1, 1995
NEW YORK -- Managed-health-care plans markedly reduce hospital costs, length of hospital stays and mortality rates, a new study shows.The survey of 1,300 hospitals looked at 50 U.S. cities with low, moderate and high levels of managed care, ranked by the percentage of the population enrolled in the plans and other factors.In cities with a high concentration of managed care -- including Los Angeles, Portland, Ore., and Minneapolis -- discretionary hospital costs were an average of 11.5 percent lower than the national norm.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
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NEWS
May 25, 2010
The U.S. is the world's richest nation, yet proportionately more children die here before reaching the age of 5 than in some developing countries. That should be unacceptable in a nation that prides itself on having the best health care system on the planet. But according to the authors of two recent reports — one global, the other local — it's a price we've chosen to pay for the growing inequality of our society. On Monday, population health researchers at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington reported that the U.S. now ranks 42 n d worst among the world's nations in child mortality rates, down from 29 t h place just 20 years ago. The next day, a study by the Baltimore City Health Department warned that residents with low incomes and little education were much more likely to become sick or die from a variety of ailments than their better-educated, more-affluent neighbors.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Antoine Dow was working at his barbershop in Druid Heights two years ago when a woman came in and asked if he knew how to correctly put his baby down to sleep. Turns out he didn't. He had laid his first son on his stomach, and planned to do the same with his second son, who had recently been born prematurely and would arrive home from the hospital any day. "No! That is not correct!" he remembers the woman saying emphatically before pulling out a video showing the proper technique: baby alone, on its back, in a crib.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The state's reported progress in reducing infant mortality is to be cheered, but the fact that infant mortality increased slightly for African-Americans in 2009, and that a smaller percentage of black women received prenatal care that year, should be deeply troubling to public health officials. Persistent racial and class disparities in access to health care are the principal reasons Maryland's infant mortality rate — the number of infant deaths per thousand live births — has remained disturbingly high over the years.
NEWS
By New York Times | February 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Bush administration officials intend to finance a proposal by President Bush to combat infant mortality in 10 cities by taking money from other health programs that serve pregnant women, poor children and the homeless.In a letter yesterday to Congress, Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, secretary of health and human services, said the administration planned to take $24 million from community health centers and $34 million from the existing Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant this year.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Officials at Harford Memorial Hospital and the Maryland Hospital Association said last week that they have misgivings about the recent "Consumer Guide to Hospitals," which lists the Havre de Grace hospital as having the second-highest death rate in Maryland.Allan Acton, vice president of the Upper Chesapeake Health System, which operates the 275-bed hospital, said he questions the study because it is based on federal Medicare figures, which are concerned with mortality rates for people 65 and older.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | October 13, 2006
A month after a Harvard study found Baltimore residents had shorter life expectancies than most Americans, city officials released new data showing improvement in the city's public health in recent years. Baltimore's mortality rate fell by nearly 20 percent since 1999, according to the data released yesterday. During the same period, statewide mortality rates dropped by about 12 percent. Life expectancy, another measure of health, rose in Baltimore from 69.2 years in 2000 to 71.6 years in 2005.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 14, 1993
THE trouble with President and Mrs. Clinton can be captured in three words: They love government. And that makes them political fossils.This is an age when many of the world's developed nations are facing the final crisis of socialism (Marx had predicted a final crisis for capitalism) -- high unemployment rates, low or negative economic growth, stifling bureaucracies and restless populations. From Bonn to Stockholm, Moscow to Tel Aviv, socialist and formerly communist states are facing the same wrenching problems.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | August 14, 1991
High incidences of drug abuse, teen pregnancy and poverty have pushed Baltimore to third among big cities in the number of children who die before they reach their first birthday, said city health officials reacting yesterday to a report by the Children's Defense Fund."
NEWS
by Annie Linskey and Andrea Siegel | August 8, 2012
Maryland's governor wants the state's gambling issues in his rear view mirror, and expressed exasperation about the persistence of the debate on the eve of a special session he is calling to add another casino and allow Vegas-style games. "I'm so sick of this issue," said Gov. Martin O'Malley, speaking to reporters at an event to tout lower infant mortality rates Wednesday morning. "I just want to get it behind us. " Later in the roughly ten minute question and answer session, he came back to the theme.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
After moving aggressively in recent years to make a dent in Maryland's stubbornly high infant mortality rate, city and state officials plan to announce Wednesday a significant drop, to the lowest level on record. Data from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show a drop to 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010. That's a 7 percent drop from the year before, a 16 percent drop from two years before and the lowest rate since recording began in the 1940s. "It's definitely going in the right direction," said Frances B. Phillips, deputy secretary of the state health department.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2010
As the state continues to struggle with a high infant mortality rate that undercuts its relative wealth, Maryland's overall rank in child well-being remained in the middle of the pack nationally, according to an annual report released by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation. The 2010 Kids Count Databook released Tuesday placed Maryland 25th in overall child well-being, the same ranking as a year ago. Although Maryland has the second-lowest percentage of children living in poverty (10 percent)
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The state's reported progress in reducing infant mortality is to be cheered, but the fact that infant mortality increased slightly for African-Americans in 2009, and that a smaller percentage of black women received prenatal care that year, should be deeply troubling to public health officials. Persistent racial and class disparities in access to health care are the principal reasons Maryland's infant mortality rate — the number of infant deaths per thousand live births — has remained disturbingly high over the years.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
Maryland's infant mortality rate dropped to its lowest point in 2009, according to preliminary statistics, but state public health officials say there is still need for improvement. The overall rate decreased to 7.2 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in Maryland last year, down from 8 in 2008 — a 10 percent decrease. The teen birth rate also decreased, from 2.8 births to women under 18 to 2.6, with declines recorded for black and white women. "We are so pleased this is showing positive progress," said Frances Phillips, Maryland's deputy secretary for public health.
NEWS
May 25, 2010
The U.S. is the world's richest nation, yet proportionately more children die here before reaching the age of 5 than in some developing countries. That should be unacceptable in a nation that prides itself on having the best health care system on the planet. But according to the authors of two recent reports — one global, the other local — it's a price we've chosen to pay for the growing inequality of our society. On Monday, population health researchers at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington reported that the U.S. now ranks 42 n d worst among the world's nations in child mortality rates, down from 29 t h place just 20 years ago. The next day, a study by the Baltimore City Health Department warned that residents with low incomes and little education were much more likely to become sick or die from a variety of ailments than their better-educated, more-affluent neighbors.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
ANNAPOLIS - The percentage of Maryland infants who are dying in their first year of life declined sharply last year, reaching the lowest level since record-keeping began more than a century ago. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and state health officials said yesterday that Maryland's infant mortality rate fell nearly 11 percent, to 7.4 deaths for every 1,000 live births. That's down from 8.3 in 1999 and 9.7 in 1990. Strong gains were recorded for both whites and blacks. Officials credited a variety of programs that improve access to health insurance, prenatal care and health information, and they praised the cooperative efforts of state and local health departments and private care-givers.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
To Alma Roberts, Maryland's grim statistics on infant mortality affect more than babies. They serve as an indicator of the state's overall health. And she's alarmed. Maryland has struggled for a decade with infant death rates above the national average - it ranked 31st in 2005 statistics - and figures released last month showed the problem getting worse. In 2007, the infant mortality rate increased, and the racial disparity in infant deaths widened. Last year, 14 newborns died per 1,000 live births, and black infants were three times as likely as white infants to die within their first year.
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