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Mortal Error

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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 23, 1992
As chairman and chief executive officer of St. Martin's Press, Thomas McCormack was well aware of the ramifications of naming the Secret Service agent who Howard Donahue says accidentally shot the third bullet at John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.So when, after several months of researching Mr. Donahue's thesis, Mr. McCormack was considering publishing "Mortal Error," he drafted a letter in November to the agent."I figured the allegation was very distressing to the man," Mr. McCormack told The Sun. "Basically, I said [in the letter]
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1997
A U.S. District Court judge in Baltimore yesterday dismissed a defamation suit filed by a retired Secret Service agent against the publishers of a book accusing him of accidentally shooting and killing President John F. Kennedy in 1963.Judge Alexander Harvey II yesterday dismissed the suit filed by George W. Hickey Jr. of Abingdon against St. Martin's Press, Simon & Shuster and the book's author, ruling that he waited too long to sue for defamation on the basis of the book "Mortal Error."The book by Bonar Menninger of Kansas City, Mo., claimed that Hickey, who as a 40-year-old Secret Service agent was assigned to Kennedy's Dallas motorcade, accidentally shot and killed the president.
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NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Time to bring back those memories of the Dealey Plaza motorcade. Rent a copy of "JFK." Re-read the Warren Commission Report. And get ready to rekindle the never-ending conspiracy theories surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy.Only this time, one of those theories will be played out in federal court in Baltimore, where a former U.S. Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president on the day of his death nearly 33 years ago is suing for libel.A little-known book called "Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK" claims that the agent from Cecil County slipped and accidentally pulled the trigger of his high-powered AR-15 rifle, striking Kennedy in the head on Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Time to bring back those memories of the Dealey Plaza motorcade. Rent a copy of "JFK." Re-read the Warren Commission Report. And get ready to rekindle the never-ending conspiracy theories surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy.Only this time, one of those theories will be played out in federal court in Baltimore, where a former U.S. Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president on the day of his death nearly 33 years ago is suing for libel.A little-known book called "Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK" claims that the agent from Cecil County slipped and accidentally pulled the trigger of his high-powered AR-15 rifle, striking Kennedy in the head on Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | November 22, 1993
WHEN the Kennedy assassination theorists convened in Dallas this past weekend, Bonar Menninger wasn't there. Howard Donahue, equally uninvited, stayed home, too. Nobody, it seems, stood up in all the noise about CIA conspiracy, Mafia conspiracy, pro-or-anti-Castro conspiracy, Texas politics conspiracy (and others) to remind the gathering that murder still isn't the likeliest explanation for the president's death. Accident is still the most sensible answer.Mr. Menninger, who lives in Kansas City, is the author of "Mortal Error," published early last year.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1997
A U.S. District Court judge in Baltimore yesterday dismissed a defamation suit filed by a retired Secret Service agent against the publishers of a book accusing him of accidentally shooting and killing President John F. Kennedy in 1963.Judge Alexander Harvey II yesterday dismissed the suit filed by George W. Hickey Jr. of Abingdon against St. Martin's Press, Simon & Shuster and the book's author, ruling that he waited too long to sue for defamation on the basis of the book "Mortal Error."The book by Bonar Menninger of Kansas City, Mo., claimed that Hickey, who as a 40-year-old Secret Service agent was assigned to Kennedy's Dallas motorcade, accidentally shot and killed the president.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor N | February 25, 1992
Howard Donahue, the Towson resident whose theory about the shooting of John F. Kennedy is the basis for the soon-to-be-published book "Mortal Error," will be a guest on "Good Morning, America" on Thursday.Mr. Donahue, a gun expert, theorizes that the third bullet to hit the president in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, was fired accidentally by a Secret Service bodyguard, whom he names in the book. (The Secret Service has called the assertion "ridiculous.") "Mortal Error," written by journalist Bonar Menninger, is to be in bookstores tomorrow, and the publisher, St. Martin's Press, says advance orders have exceeded 100,000.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 25, 1992
Howard Donahue, the Towson resident whose theory about the shooting of John F. Kennedy is the basis for the soon-to-be-published book "Mortal Error," will be a guest on "Good Morning, America" on Thursday.Mr. Donahue, a gun expert, theorizes that the third bullet to hit the president in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, was fired accidentally by a Secret Service bodyguard, whom he names in the book. (The Secret Service has called the assertion "ridiculous.") "Mortal Error," written by journalist Bonar Menninger, is to be in bookstores tomorrow, and the publisher, St. Martin's Press, says advance orders have exceeded 100,000.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | February 27, 1992
WILL THE WORLD accept the idea that John F. Kennedy's death was an unintentional homicide? That the bullet hitting him in the back of the skull came from the gun fired, inadvertently, by a Secret Service bodyguard riding in the car immediately behind the presidential limousine?Such is the thesis advanced by Howard Donahue, a Towson gun expert, in the new book "Mortal Error," by Bonar Menninger (St. Martin's Press, $23.95). On logic -- that is, consistency with the known facts in the case -- Mr. Donahue's explanation is without rival.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
A retired U.S. Secret Service agent has been paid an undisclosed sum of money by the publishers of a book that claimed he fired the bullet that killed President John F. Kennedy, an allegation that prompted the agent to sue.The obscure book, "Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK," claimed that George W. Hickey Jr. slipped during the confusion on Nov. 22, 1963, and accidentally pulled the trigger of his high-powered AR-15 rifle. Kennedy, according to Missouri-based author Bonar Menninger, was hit in the head by the bullet.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | November 22, 1993
WHEN the Kennedy assassination theorists convened in Dallas this past weekend, Bonar Menninger wasn't there. Howard Donahue, equally uninvited, stayed home, too. Nobody, it seems, stood up in all the noise about CIA conspiracy, Mafia conspiracy, pro-or-anti-Castro conspiracy, Texas politics conspiracy (and others) to remind the gathering that murder still isn't the likeliest explanation for the president's death. Accident is still the most sensible answer.Mr. Menninger, who lives in Kansas City, is the author of "Mortal Error," published early last year.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | February 27, 1992
WILL THE WORLD accept the idea that John F. Kennedy's death was an unintentional homicide? That the bullet hitting him in the back of the skull came from the gun fired, inadvertently, by a Secret Service bodyguard riding in the car immediately behind the presidential limousine?Such is the thesis advanced by Howard Donahue, a Towson gun expert, in the new book "Mortal Error," by Bonar Menninger (St. Martin's Press, $23.95). On logic -- that is, consistency with the known facts in the case -- Mr. Donahue's explanation is without rival.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor N | February 25, 1992
Howard Donahue, the Towson resident whose theory about the shooting of John F. Kennedy is the basis for the soon-to-be-published book "Mortal Error," will be a guest on "Good Morning, America" on Thursday.Mr. Donahue, a gun expert, theorizes that the third bullet to hit the president in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, was fired accidentally by a Secret Service bodyguard, whom he names in the book. (The Secret Service has called the assertion "ridiculous.") "Mortal Error," written by journalist Bonar Menninger, is to be in bookstores tomorrow, and the publisher, St. Martin's Press, says advance orders have exceeded 100,000.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 25, 1992
Howard Donahue, the Towson resident whose theory about the shooting of John F. Kennedy is the basis for the soon-to-be-published book "Mortal Error," will be a guest on "Good Morning, America" on Thursday.Mr. Donahue, a gun expert, theorizes that the third bullet to hit the president in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, was fired accidentally by a Secret Service bodyguard, whom he names in the book. (The Secret Service has called the assertion "ridiculous.") "Mortal Error," written by journalist Bonar Menninger, is to be in bookstores tomorrow, and the publisher, St. Martin's Press, says advance orders have exceeded 100,000.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 23, 1992
As chairman and chief executive officer of St. Martin's Press, Thomas McCormack was well aware of the ramifications of naming the Secret Service agent who Howard Donahue says accidentally shot the third bullet at John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.So when, after several months of researching Mr. Donahue's thesis, Mr. McCormack was considering publishing "Mortal Error," he drafted a letter in November to the agent."I figured the allegation was very distressing to the man," Mr. McCormack told The Sun. "Basically, I said [in the letter]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1999
Howard Charles Hinman Donahue, a retired gunsmith and nationally known ballistics expert who concluded that a Secret Service agent fired the bullet that killed President John F. Kennedy, died Thursday of complications of pneumonia at his Towson home. He was 77.Mr. Donahue first came to national attention in 1967 when CBS television investigated the Warren Commission report and had several gunning experts test-fire the same make and model of the Mannlicher-Carcano Italian rifle that was used by Lee Harvey Oswald to shoot at Mr. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas.
NEWS
April 4, 1992
LACROSSE, horse racing, duckpins, sailing, jousting and other pastimes favored by Marylanders have quietly gone about their business, but under the surface there must be throbbing ire the noise volume over baseball.It doesn't promise to let up. Baseball & Baltimore have a train of events aligned, to follow 1992's acclaimed new proscenium: in 1993, the All-Star Game; in 1994, the centennial of our first pennant; in 1995, the centennial of Babe Ruth's birth -- followed, all going well, by Cal Ripken Jr.'s passing Lou Gehrig in the most-consecutive-games-played standings; and in 1996, 30 years after Baltimore's first World Series championship, maybe this generation's Orioles will win something.
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