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Morse Code

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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1995
As the Titanic gulped sea water on that awful night in April 1912, radio operator Jack Phillips was at his station, pounding out an SOS on the ship's radiotelegraph key in Morse code.Eighty-three years later, some ocean-going ships still rely on Samuel F. B. Morse's language of dots and dashes to maintain their links with shore and potential rescuers.But last night, the U.S. Coast Guard stopped listening."The chilling SOS signal will never again be received," the Coast Guard said in a farewell message at 7 p.m. yesterday, when communications centers from Chesapeake, Va., to Kodiak, Alaska, shut down all Morse code operations in favor of modern technologies.
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FEATURES
By Megan Isennock, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Bridesmaids gifts are tricky. Getting your bridesmaids accessories to wear for the wedding (which seems to be customary) is a nice gesture but can come off as controlling. You've already (most likely) picked out their dress, given notes on hair and make up, and told them which shoes to buy. Gifting them matching jewelry to be worn on the day of could be met with a complicated mix of gratitude and attitude. I've been struggling with what to give my bridesmaids, and my research inspired me to come up with a list of suggestions for other brides.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
When the S.S. Vestris foundered off the Virginia Capes in 1928 with the loss of 110 lives, it wasn't for lack of a telegraph officer urgently tapping out Morse code.But the SOS came too late -- by six hours, the British Board of Trade later decided. The victims, including Capt. William J. Carey, may have died because he delayed ordering the chief wireless officer to send his distress signal.The dramatic story of the overloaded Liverpool ship -- its rolling in huge seas, its agonized calls for help, its death plunge and the rescue by other ships of two-thirds of the passengers and crew -- illustrates the role Morse code has played for a century in saving thousands of lives at sea.Morse code, as of Feb. 1, is no longer the formal communications mode on the high seas.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
Fruit sale for charity The Severn River Lions club will be selling fresh Florida oranges and ruby red grapefruit at Severna Park High School on Saturday, March 24, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The proceeds from the event will support vision and hearing screening, eyeglasses for the needy, youth programs, local student scholarships and other causes. The group will take orders through March 17 or sell fruit for cash at the event. To place an advance order, call Lion Ollie at 410-647-7338 or Lion Nancy, at 410-439-5770.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
Morse code is entering the 21st century - or at least the late 20th. The 160-year-old communication system has a new character to denote the "@" symbol used in e-mail addresses. In December, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which oversees the entire frequency spectrum, from amateur radio to satellites, voted to add the new character. The new sign, which will be known as a "commat," consists of the signals for "A" (dot-dash) and "C" (dash-dot-dash-dot), with no space between them.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
The dits and dahs of Morse code sound rhythmic, almost musical, when tapped out in quick succession to spell words or send messages. Ditditdit Dahdahdah Ditditdit, meaning SOS.From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, the dits and dahs will flow from a small radio Harold D. Camlin keeps in his Winnebago.The vehicle, which will be parked on the lot of Henkel's restaurant in Annapolis Junction, will serve as Morse code radio station for the Glen Burnie-based Bay Area Amateur Radio Society.The ham radio operators say this will be their way of commemorating Samuel F. B. Morse's first telegraph message from Baltimore to Washington, sent via a relay station at Annapolis Junction, now known as Savage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
Carl Lewis Amrein, who began his Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad career as a telegrapher and retired as the line's president, died Monday of a heart ailment at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 93 and lived in Satyr Hill.He started working in 1923 as an office boy in a Bel Air canning company and taught himself Morse code, a communication system that employed copper wires, batteries, clicks and pauses.Morse code was used by the railroads.On Oct. 6, 1924, Mr. Amrein was hired as station agent in the Harford County village of Fallston, where the coal-fired, smoke-belching freight and passenger trains passed on their way to Baltimore and York, Pa., the southern and northern ends of the small line known affectionately as the "Ma & Pa."
NEWS
By Russell Baker | April 7, 1995
THE COAST Guard has abandoned the Morse code. Or to express it in an anguished cry of that now obsolete tongue: "Dit-dit-dit, dah-dah-dah, dit-dit-dit."It has to be said very fast -- "ditditdit dahdahdah ditditdit" -- and means, of course, SOS.Morse code was invented by Samuel F.B. Morse, who sent the first coded message in 1844. As every schoolchild once had to learn, that message was, "What hath God wrought."Communications machinery has improved mightily since 1844, but the same cannot be said for the quality of messages.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2001
WHEN HE WAS 8 years old, Ryan Rose wanted to earn his amateur radio license. He'd watched his parents, both of whom are ham radio enthusiasts, talk with people all around the world and wanted to join in the fun. So Ryan's father, Bob Rose, took him to the Davidsonville home of the Anne Arundel Radio Club, where Ryan learned about transistors, atmospherics, satellites, FCC rules, Morse code and other things a licensed amateur radio operator needs to...
FEATURES
By Megan Isennock, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Bridesmaids gifts are tricky. Getting your bridesmaids accessories to wear for the wedding (which seems to be customary) is a nice gesture but can come off as controlling. You've already (most likely) picked out their dress, given notes on hair and make up, and told them which shoes to buy. Gifting them matching jewelry to be worn on the day of could be met with a complicated mix of gratitude and attitude. I've been struggling with what to give my bridesmaids, and my research inspired me to come up with a list of suggestions for other brides.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 5, 2011
Over the weekend, a demolition crew turned One, a chic night club for most of the last decade, into a pile of brick, broken cinderblock and sand. If you're of a certain age and missed One's run as a nightclub, you will know this location, at Guilford Avenue and Saratoga Street, as House of Welsh Corner. Instead of big dance floors and theatrically-lighted bars stocked with Dom Perignon, you'll think of a classic Baltimore tavern that served sizzling steaks on metal plates and Maryland whiskey at a bar without stools.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
It was met with more criticism than even Michael Moore could have mustered. Union representatives said it would steal American jobs. Conspiracy theorists believed it was intrusively "Big Brother." Some Christians thought it hid the number 666, representing the Antichrist. TV talk-show host Phil Donahue called it a corporate plot against consumers. It survived all of that to mark its 30th year this month. Happy birthday to the Universal Product Code. The UPC, the most common version of the so-called bar code, wasn't as warmly embraced nor as breathtaking as some emerging technologies, but its impact on retailing has been enormous.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
Morse code is entering the 21st century - or at least the late 20th. The 160-year-old communication system has a new character to denote the "@" symbol used in e-mail addresses. In December, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which oversees the entire frequency spectrum, from amateur radio to satellites, voted to add the new character. The new sign, which will be known as a "commat," consists of the signals for "A" (dot-dash) and "C" (dash-dot-dash-dot), with no space between them.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 2001
LONDON - She was a British signaler on a Scottish shore. He was a sailor from Ohio on a decrepit ship at sea. Four miles divided them. The staccato flashes of Morse code on lamps united them. It was the spring of 1944, and for about a month they communicated via flashes of light from ship to shore, until the sailor departed without a goodbye, bound for France, headed to D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy. She got a letter he mailed before he left and then heard nothing else. She assumed he had died.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2001
WHEN HE WAS 8 years old, Ryan Rose wanted to earn his amateur radio license. He'd watched his parents, both of whom are ham radio enthusiasts, talk with people all around the world and wanted to join in the fun. So Ryan's father, Bob Rose, took him to the Davidsonville home of the Anne Arundel Radio Club, where Ryan learned about transistors, atmospherics, satellites, FCC rules, Morse code and other things a licensed amateur radio operator needs to...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
Carl Lewis Amrein, who began his Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad career as a telegrapher and retired as the line's president, died Monday of a heart ailment at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 93 and lived in Satyr Hill.He started working in 1923 as an office boy in a Bel Air canning company and taught himself Morse code, a communication system that employed copper wires, batteries, clicks and pauses.Morse code was used by the railroads.On Oct. 6, 1924, Mr. Amrein was hired as station agent in the Harford County village of Fallston, where the coal-fired, smoke-belching freight and passenger trains passed on their way to Baltimore and York, Pa., the southern and northern ends of the small line known affectionately as the "Ma & Pa."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
His eyes still light up when he talks about the war -- even after 80 years. And later this month, 105-year-old Paul W. Englar's gritty memories as a doughboy will come full circle.The Carroll County resident has been named a Chevalier of the National Order of the Legion of Honor by the French government. He's one of 600 living American veterans of World War I who fought in France and are being honored as part of last year's 80th anniversary of the Armistice, French officials said.Recognition for his role as a Morse code radio operator in the trenches against German troops will take place July 23 in a ceremony at Carroll Lutheran Village outside Westminster, where Englar lives.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
A picture may be worth a thousand words, but Rand InterACTIVE is betting that interactive pictures with sound, full-motion video and really cool graphics could mean big business for the Baltimore-based start-up.Rand, lodged in an upstairs office at 1118 St. Paul St., creates interactive CD-ROMs that companies and organizations use to market new products or services. The CDs are designed to make a much bigger splash than such standard fare as color pamphlets, slide-show demonstrations or three-ring binders stuffed with page after forbidding page of grayish, jargon-laden text.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
His eyes still light up when he talks about the war -- even after 80 years. And later this month, 105-year-old Paul W. Englar's gritty memories as a doughboy will come full circle.The Carroll County resident has been named a Chevalier of the National Order of the Legion of Honor by the French government. He's one of 600 living American veterans of World War I who fought in France and are being honored as part of last year's 80th anniversary of the Armistice, French officials said.Recognition for his role as a Morse code radio operator in the trenches against German troops will take place July 23 in a ceremony at Carroll Lutheran Village outside Westminster, where Englar lives.
NEWS
By Thomas Graves and Thomas Graves,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
There's an old joke about how those laser scanners in the grocery store have dramatically changed the checkout-line experience.In the old days, the clerk would pick up each item, look at it, announce the price and ring it up: "Dollarthirtynine, twonineteen, sixtythree, dollareleven " Then would come an item without a price tag. So the clerk would get on the microphone and holler to the whole store, "Al, how much for a jar of olives?"Nowadays, all the products have bar codes, so the clerk just has to pass it over a scanner.
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