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By FRED RASMUSSEN | November 10, 1991
The crowds gathered in the early-morning light along the shores of the lower Chesapeake Bay to catch a glimpse of the luxury liner Morro Castle.In the waters where the Ward Line turboelectric ship had first felt the crisp bite of the sea, and where it had completed sea trials in 1930, it was now returning, a burned-out hulk that had claimed 134 lives when it caught fire off the coast of New Jersey in September 1934.Slowly moving up the bay to Baltimore and its final docking place that morning in April 1935, the Morro Castle was far removed from the gay and opulent liner that plied the waters from New York to Havana, offering weekly sailings advertised as "Get Away From the Depression Cruises."
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By FRED RASMUSSEN | June 16, 1995
Capt. James F. Bogan slowly mounted the porch steps of the restored Sea Girt, N.J., Lighthouse on a warm September Saturday last year to attend a meeting of survivors and historians who had gathered to discuss the burning of the liner Morro Castle, which caught fire off the Jersey coast in 1934.It was an event he had spent most of his life trying to forget, when out of the front parlor of the lighthouse stepped Agnes Prince Margolis, 89, holding the Morro Castle life preserver that she wore that fateful morning.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 7, 1992
I HAD a friend on the ship. I don't know what happened to her. I hope she got out."The speaker was Ruth Prince. She and her sister, Agnes, had just survived the burning of the luxury liner Morro Castle off the coast of New Jersey on Sept. 8, 1934, and now she was being interviewed.These two devoted sisters, natives of Pottstown, Pa., had decided to take one of the Ward Line's "Get Away From the Depression" cruises to Havana.The Morro Castle party began the moment the ship pulled away from its East River pier in New York.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 7, 1992
I HAD a friend on the ship. I don't know what happened to her. I hope she got out."The speaker was Ruth Prince. She and her sister, Agnes, had just survived the burning of the luxury liner Morro Castle off the coast of New Jersey on Sept. 8, 1934, and now she was being interviewed.These two devoted sisters, natives of Pottstown, Pa., had decided to take one of the Ward Line's "Get Away From the Depression" cruises to Havana.The Morro Castle party began the moment the ship pulled away from its East River pier in New York.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
A federal judge in New Jersey has ordered the U.S. government to provide a Baltimore writer and his co-author access to some, but not all, of the previously secret documents they had sought for a book on the 1934 Morro Castle steamship fire.Frederick N. Rasmussen, of Riderwood, and Robert J. McDonnell, of Lakehurst, N.J., filed suit under the Freedom of Information Act more than three years ago after the FBI and the Navy repeatedly blocked their access to key documents.The historians think the ship was tied to politically embarrassing gun-running to both sides in a Cuban revolution half a century ago, but the government has tried to keep the details under wraps.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 8, 1991
Due to an editing error, a story in yesterday's Accent misstated the fate of the S.S. Morro Castle. In 1934, the ship burned off the New Jersey shore and floated to the Asbury Park beach, where it sat for several months. Eventually, it was towed to Baltimore to be scrapped.SHELLEY DZIEDZIC was a little girl on the Eastern Shore when she saw a gloomy lithograph in her grandparents' home of the 1912 Titanic sinking."It was dark, scary and creepy, the ship was so vulnerable in the middle of the ocean," Dziedzic says.
NEWS
By FRED RASMUSSEN | June 16, 1995
Capt. James F. Bogan slowly mounted the porch steps of the restored Sea Girt, N.J., Lighthouse on a warm September Saturday last year to attend a meeting of survivors and historians who had gathered to discuss the burning of the liner Morro Castle, which caught fire off the Jersey coast in 1934.It was an event he had spent most of his life trying to forget, when out of the front parlor of the lighthouse stepped Agnes Prince Margolis, 89, holding the Morro Castle life preserver that she wore that fateful morning.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing Critic | September 23, 1992
September Song's 19th annual fall production opened last weekend with a mostly successful launching of Cole Porter's nautical comical musical, "Anything Goes."The production celebrated Porter's 100th birthday and recognized the immeasurable contributions of the highly talented Mary Lee Schmall to Carroll County theater and music.This musical has one of Porter's finest scores, and it is upon this that successful productions rest.The book, by the talented team of Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Howard Lindsey and Russell Crouse, while occasionally sophisticated and often bawdy, is painfully thin and monumentally corny.
NEWS
June 14, 1995
James F. Bogan, 82, captain of the fishing vessel that rescued 67 passengers from the burning ocean liner Morro Castle in 1934 off Sea Girt, N.J., died Saturday at his home in Sea Girt.A. Darius Davis, 89, the last surviving founder of the Winn-Dixie Stores Inc. supermarket chain, died of a stroke Sunday in Jacksonville, Fla. The company operates 1,186 stores in 14 Southern states, and is the nation's fifth largest supermarket chain.Arthur J. Kropp, 37, president of People for the American Way, a liberal advocacy group that was created to preserve the separation between church and state, died of AIDS on Monday in Washington.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
Seth H. Moseley, 92, who helped cover the Hindenburg disaster for the Associated Press, died Saturday in Torrington, Conn. In March 1932, while a reporter for the New York Evening Journal, Mr. Moseley obtained an exclusive interview with Charles A. Lindbergh hours after the aviator's infant son was kidnapped from Mr. Lindbergh's Hopewell, N.J., home. He also reported on the September 1934 shipboard fire that killed 134 people and set the SS Morro Castle adrift off the New Jersey coast.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing Critic | September 23, 1992
September Song's 19th annual fall production opened last weekend with a mostly successful launching of Cole Porter's nautical comical musical, "Anything Goes."The production celebrated Porter's 100th birthday and recognized the immeasurable contributions of the highly talented Mary Lee Schmall to Carroll County theater and music.This musical has one of Porter's finest scores, and it is upon this that successful productions rest.The book, by the talented team of Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Howard Lindsey and Russell Crouse, while occasionally sophisticated and often bawdy, is painfully thin and monumentally corny.
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN | November 10, 1991
The crowds gathered in the early-morning light along the shores of the lower Chesapeake Bay to catch a glimpse of the luxury liner Morro Castle.In the waters where the Ward Line turboelectric ship had first felt the crisp bite of the sea, and where it had completed sea trials in 1930, it was now returning, a burned-out hulk that had claimed 134 lives when it caught fire off the coast of New Jersey in September 1934.Slowly moving up the bay to Baltimore and its final docking place that morning in April 1935, the Morro Castle was far removed from the gay and opulent liner that plied the waters from New York to Havana, offering weekly sailings advertised as "Get Away From the Depression Cruises."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
A federal judge in New Jersey has ordered the U.S. government to provide a Baltimore writer and his co-author access to some, but not all, of the previously secret documents they had sought for a book on the 1934 Morro Castle steamship fire.Frederick N. Rasmussen, of Riderwood, and Robert J. McDonnell, of Lakehurst, N.J., filed suit under the Freedom of Information Act more than three years ago after the FBI and the Navy repeatedly blocked their access to key documents.The historians think the ship was tied to politically embarrassing gun-running to both sides in a Cuban revolution half a century ago, but the government has tried to keep the details under wraps.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 8, 1991
Due to an editing error, a story in yesterday's Accent misstated the fate of the S.S. Morro Castle. In 1934, the ship burned off the New Jersey shore and floated to the Asbury Park beach, where it sat for several months. Eventually, it was towed to Baltimore to be scrapped.SHELLEY DZIEDZIC was a little girl on the Eastern Shore when she saw a gloomy lithograph in her grandparents' home of the 1912 Titanic sinking."It was dark, scary and creepy, the ship was so vulnerable in the middle of the ocean," Dziedzic says.
NEWS
October 8, 1995
Samuel G. Blackman , 90, who broke the news that Charles Lindbergh's baby had been kidnapped and went on to hold the top editorial job at the Associated Press, died in Washington on Thursday of heart failure.Mr. Blackman covered the Morro Castle steamship fire, the crashes of the dirigibles Akron and Hindenburg and the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby, one of the most sensational stories of its time.Acting on a tip, he hurried from his AP office in Trenton, N.J., to the Lindbergh estate, where he found four men searching with flashlights.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Sixty years ago this week, the world's attention was riveted on one man's dream as the liner United States, designed by William Francis Gibbs, steamed eastward across the Atlantic on its maiden voyage. Known as "The Big U," the liner sailed from New York's Ambrose Light to Bishop's Rock, off the English coast, the official Blue Riband course, in three days, 10 hours and 40 minutes, establishing a record that remains unbroken for a trans-Atlantic crossing. Gibbs, who was known during his lifetime as America's greatest naval designer, was consumed with the design and building of the United States, the fastest, most powerful and luxurious superliner ever built, which became his enduring legacy.
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