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Morris Chestnut

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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Morris Chestnut made a name for himself as Ricky, a college-bound football star whose life was cut short, in the heart-wrenching 1991 film "Boyz n the Hood. " Since then, Chestnut has tackled a variety of roles. He's been a groom-to-be dealing with his fiancee's infidelity in "The Best Man"; an alien with a soft spot for humans on ABC's "V"; and Vivica A. Fox's love match in "Two Can Play That Game. " This weekend, Chestnut will be on stage at the Lyric for five performances of "What My Husband Doesn't Know," a "Fatal Attraction"-esque drama, written, directed and produced by Morgan State University alumnus David E. Talbert.
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NEWS
April 7, 2013
now playing "The Call" (R). A 911 operator takes a call from a teenage girl who has been abducted, and she realizes she must confront a killer from her past in order to save the girl's life. With Halle Berry, Abigail Breslin and Morris Chestnut. TownMall Cinemas (12:20 p.m.) "The Croods" (PG). A prehistoric family embarks on a journey into the world when their cave is destroyed. With Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. TownMall Cinemas (1:10*, 4:30, 6:50* p.m.) "Evil Dead" (R)
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FEATURES
November 16, 2005
Lifelong pals play hoops and share bad advice on dating in The Brothers (11:15 p.m.-1 a.m., TBS). Morris Chestnut (above) stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Morris Chestnut made a name for himself as Ricky, a college-bound football star whose life was cut short, in the heart-wrenching 1991 film "Boyz n the Hood. " Since then, Chestnut has tackled a variety of roles. He's been a groom-to-be dealing with his fiancee's infidelity in "The Best Man"; an alien with a soft spot for humans on ABC's "V"; and Vivica A. Fox's love match in "Two Can Play That Game. " This weekend, Chestnut will be on stage at the Lyric for five performances of "What My Husband Doesn't Know," a "Fatal Attraction"-esque drama, written, directed and produced by Morgan State University alumnus David E. Talbert.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 14, 2004
They say that breaking up is hard to do. Now we know that it's true. Breakin' All the Rules, a comedy about breaking up, proves it. A charming cast, engaging setting and clever conceit for a story aren't enough to make Rules break the run of unfunny romantic comedies this spring. It's a movie with very good-looking people trying to find something funny to say or do. And it's more proof that Jamie Foxx is mellowing into somebody who may yet become a good dramatic actor but is no longer an interesting comic one. Foxx plays Quincy Watson, a magazine editor whose girlfriend dumps him just as he is reassigned to the task of finding ways to lay off 15 percent of his colleagues.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
SUN SCORE *** Like Mike is a sure-fire heart-warmer: lively and funny yet emotion-charged and uplifting. This family friendly movie, about a little kid who ends up a star on an NBA team, soars above so many sports comedies because director John Schultz and writers Michael Elliot and Jordan Moffet aim as high as the basketball hoops that figure so importantly in their story. They consistently set off the fast-moving fantasy action on the basketball court with the reality of a father-son relationship that develops in fits and starts and no small amount of anguish, even given considerable humor.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2001
A bunch of guys hanging out, shooting some hoops and just generally trying to figure out women. That's what "The Brothers" is all about. And while a more determinedly miserable group of guys would be hard to imagine, there are enough moments that ring true sprinkled throughout this movie to command your attention, if not your imagination. There's nothing here we haven't seen on screen a hundred times before. If one of these guys were actually happy, and made something of an effort to stay that way - now that would be a movie to cherish.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
Sometimes, love is a war best viewed from the sidelines. The mind games, the cutting words, the deceit - people can't really enjoy this stuff, can they? But hey, at least in Two Can Play That Game, the story of a woman trying to teach her man a lesson, and her man's refusal to learn without a fight, the carnage is leavened with a few laughs. Shante Smith (Vivica A. Fox) is a woman with her act together: She's smart, she's beautiful, she's got a big-time position with a big-time company, and she's got herself one fine specimen of man. She's so all-that, in fact, that she's the idol of her friends, who come to her for relationship advice.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 12, 1991
BOYZ N The Hood'' is another in a growing number of films that are about blacks and are written and directed by blacks. Put this down as one of the better ones.The film is crude. It hasn't been cut that well, but it has strength and a story that holds the viewer's interest from beginning to end. It is also very well acted. The film takes place in South Central Los Angeles, and before it begins, we are told that male blacks have a good chance of dying by gunfire and that in most instances, they are murdered by other blacks.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Not Easily Broken, adapted from T.D. Jakes' novel of the same name, dramatizes the need to let God into marriage with a preachy style that operates like call-and-response. It's energizing to hear an audience screech at an adulterous kiss the way horror fans do when a stalker pops up with a knife. The director, Bill Duke, and the screenwriter, Brian Bird, know how to hit fans of Christian fiction where they live. Too bad the moviemakers never take their viewers beyond the banality of reassuring family values.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Not Easily Broken, adapted from T.D. Jakes' novel of the same name, dramatizes the need to let God into marriage with a preachy style that operates like call-and-response. It's energizing to hear an audience screech at an adulterous kiss the way horror fans do when a stalker pops up with a knife. The director, Bill Duke, and the screenwriter, Brian Bird, know how to hit fans of Christian fiction where they live. Too bad the moviemakers never take their viewers beyond the banality of reassuring family values.
FEATURES
November 16, 2005
Lifelong pals play hoops and share bad advice on dating in The Brothers (11:15 p.m.-1 a.m., TBS). Morris Chestnut (above) stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Morris Chestnut didn't pursue acting for its elusive promise of fame and glory. Though recently, a steady flow of roles in mainstream films has kept Chestnut's resume growing, the thought of becoming a household name doesn't charm him at all. Right now, he's content with landing medium-sized characters such as Tommy Drake in Ladder 49 (which opens tomorrow)and keeping his career rolling. "A lot of people get into the industry because they want to be famous," Chestnut said. "I just want to have the lifestyle of being able to be flexible.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 14, 2004
They say that breaking up is hard to do. Now we know that it's true. Breakin' All the Rules, a comedy about breaking up, proves it. A charming cast, engaging setting and clever conceit for a story aren't enough to make Rules break the run of unfunny romantic comedies this spring. It's a movie with very good-looking people trying to find something funny to say or do. And it's more proof that Jamie Foxx is mellowing into somebody who may yet become a good dramatic actor but is no longer an interesting comic one. Foxx plays Quincy Watson, a magazine editor whose girlfriend dumps him just as he is reassigned to the task of finding ways to lay off 15 percent of his colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
Imax premiere attracts stars, weakens knees Who knew a star-stuffed movie premiere could be so low-key? And here in B-more, no less. But there they all were - Oscar-winning Titanic director James Cameron, actors Bill Paxton, John Travolta, Robert Patrick, Joaquin Phoenix, Morris Chestnut, Balthazar Getty, as well as Disney Studios honcho Dick Cooke - walking the red carpet inside the Maryland Science Center last week. They and a couple of hundred other guests were handed 3-D glasses as they entered the Imax theater and settled in to watch Cameron's new documentary, Ghosts of the Abyss.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
SUN SCORE *** Like Mike is a sure-fire heart-warmer: lively and funny yet emotion-charged and uplifting. This family friendly movie, about a little kid who ends up a star on an NBA team, soars above so many sports comedies because director John Schultz and writers Michael Elliot and Jordan Moffet aim as high as the basketball hoops that figure so importantly in their story. They consistently set off the fast-moving fantasy action on the basketball court with the reality of a father-son relationship that develops in fits and starts and no small amount of anguish, even given considerable humor.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
now playing "The Call" (R). A 911 operator takes a call from a teenage girl who has been abducted, and she realizes she must confront a killer from her past in order to save the girl's life. With Halle Berry, Abigail Breslin and Morris Chestnut. TownMall Cinemas (12:20 p.m.) "The Croods" (PG). A prehistoric family embarks on a journey into the world when their cave is destroyed. With Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. TownMall Cinemas (1:10*, 4:30, 6:50* p.m.) "Evil Dead" (R)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
Sometimes, love is a war best viewed from the sidelines. The mind games, the cutting words, the deceit - people can't really enjoy this stuff, can they? But hey, at least in Two Can Play That Game, the story of a woman trying to teach her man a lesson, and her man's refusal to learn without a fight, the carnage is leavened with a few laughs. Shante Smith (Vivica A. Fox) is a woman with her act together: She's smart, she's beautiful, she's got a big-time position with a big-time company, and she's got herself one fine specimen of man. She's so all-that, in fact, that she's the idol of her friends, who come to her for relationship advice.
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