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Morphine

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NEWS
By Staff Report | February 6, 1993
A quarter of a million dollars worth of morphine was seized yesterday from an apartment that police believe was the base for a large West Baltimore drug-distribution ring, narcotics officers said.Western District drug enforcement officers raided the apartment in the 300 block of W. Monument St. about 2:40 p.m. and found roughly 1 pound of unpackaged morphine and 5,100 small glassine bags containing morphine, police said. The glassine bags appeared to be ready for sale on the street and would fetch about $20 apiece, police said.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Towson gynecologist Dr. John Yacoub pleaded guilty Wednesday to illegally dispensing narcotic painkillers to his girlfriend and two others, according to federal court documents. Under a plea agreement, the former OB/GYN and surgeon at Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Saint Agnes Hospital avoids a trial and could receive a reduced sentence, according to the documents. The maximum penalty he faces under federal guidelines is 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine. Federal authorities began investigating Yacoub last year based on a tip from a member of his staff who reported that he kept large bottles of drugs, considered controlled dangerous substances under federal law, in his office.
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NEWS
January 13, 2006
A man suspected of posing as a physician and stealing a morphine-administering patch from a patient at a Northwest Baltimore medical facility has been arrested on charges of assault and robbery, city police said yesterday. Aleksandr Dzhanashvili, 31, of the first block of Stonehenge Circle in Pikesville was charged in a warrant with assault and robbery. He was arrested Wednesday by members of the Regional Warrant Apprehension Task Force shortly after he entered Harbor Hospital in South Baltimore, police said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
An estimated 3.5 million cancer patients around the globe are in severe pain from their disease, but many get no relief. In poor countries the cost is considered too high for drugs like morphine when such opioids are often stolen, abused or not taken according to instruction. But some Johns Hopkins University scientists have been working on a solution for those patients, as well as some in the United States, that uses a flexible button-sized disk implanted under the skin that releases consistent doses of painkiller over a month.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 28, 1992
POCOMOKE CITY -- The daughter of an elderly woman who authorities believe was intentionally given a fatal dose of morphine at a nursing home said she thinks the death was an act of cold-blooded murder, not mercy."
NEWS
By Tonya Maxwell and Tonya Maxwell,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2005
In a tiny laboratory in Germany, an obscure young pharmacist's apprentice managed to concentrate the power of poppies into crystals that could control coughs, ease pain and tease users into a pleasant slumber. Friedrich Sertuerner, 22, published a paper announcing his discovery in 1805. He was ignored. So he went back to his experiments, injecting dogs with the drug he had extracted from opium and doping himself and his buddies. A dozen years later he published again, this time naming his discovery after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
EASTON -- A Worcester County grand jury has indicted three former employees of a Pocomoke City nursing home in the death of a 91-year-old patient, who investigators think was killed with an unauthorized dose of a powerful morphine-based painkiller.Former employees Marjorie Karen Alpaugh, 51, of Princess Anne, and Delores Lee Walker, 47, of Fruitland, were charged yesterday with first-degree murder, conspiracy to commit murder, distribution of morphine, conspiracy to distribute morphine and possession of morphine.
NEWS
By Raymond L.Sanchez and Raymond L.Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | February 12, 1991
A former technician at Francis Scott Key Medical Center has been charged with stealing large quantities of morphineDaniel Chodnicki, 30, of the first block of Duntore Place in Fullerton, was indicted by the Baltimore grand jury last week on 235 counts of possession with intent to distribute morphine and Fentanyl, powerful analgesics, and diazepam (Valium), a tranquilizer. He also was charged with felony theft in what city prosecutors called the largest case of its kind in recent memory."Both the size and the scope are alarming," said State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
EASTON -- A Worcester County grand jury has indicted three former employees of a Pocomoke City nursing home in connection with the death of 91-year-old patient who investigators believe was killed with an unauthorized dose of a powerful morphine-based painkiller.Maidie Lang Shay died Jan. 29 at Hartley Hall Nursing Home, a well-known facility for the elderly on the Lower Eastern Shore.The state medical examiner's office in Baltimore found traces of morphine in tissue samples taken from the woman's remains after investigations by nursing home officials and police raised questions about the cause of Mrs. Shay's death.
NEWS
February 26, 2002
The Baltimore metropolitan area ranks second in the nation for heroin and morphine abuse, with 227 emergency department visits per 100,000 residents. Figures are from 2000. Heroin/morphine emergency visits Metro area per 100,000 population Rank Newark, N.J. 238 1 Baltimore 227 2 Chicago 208 3 San Francisco 170 4 New York 128 5 Seattle 103 6 Boston 97 7 Philadelphia 81 8 New Orleans 77 9 Detroit 75 10 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NEWS
January 10, 2012
My wife is disabled. She is 58 years old, as am I. At one time, she was a wonderful teacher, sales associate for a large telecom and later a vibrant pharmacy technician and caregiver for her disabled father and mother-in-law. She has fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. She has seizures. They don't know why, but they are documented in a hospital study as not caused by epilepsy. She can no longer drive nor would I want her to. She wears a morphine patch to get through the day, along with various other drugs.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 30, 2009
Clinton McCracken and Carrie John knew all about addictions and obsessive behavior. Both worked as postdoctoral research fellows at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and earlier this year published their conclusions from a study of "compulsions and habit formation." But their research might have taken too personal a turn. John, 29, a Wake Forest University graduate with a doctorate in physiology and pharmacology, died Sunday after apparently injecting herself with what McCracken called a "bad" batch of buprenorphine, a narcotic known on the street as "bupe" and commonly used to treat heroin addiction.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
A man suspected of posing as a physician and stealing a morphine-administering patch from a patient at a Northwest Baltimore medical facility has been arrested on charges of assault and robbery, city police said yesterday. Aleksandr Dzhanashvili, 31, of the first block of Stonehenge Circle in Pikesville was charged in a warrant with assault and robbery. He was arrested Wednesday by members of the Regional Warrant Apprehension Task Force shortly after he entered Harbor Hospital in South Baltimore, police said.
NEWS
By Tonya Maxwell and Tonya Maxwell,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2005
In a tiny laboratory in Germany, an obscure young pharmacist's apprentice managed to concentrate the power of poppies into crystals that could control coughs, ease pain and tease users into a pleasant slumber. Friedrich Sertuerner, 22, published a paper announcing his discovery in 1805. He was ignored. So he went back to his experiments, injecting dogs with the drug he had extracted from opium and doping himself and his buddies. A dozen years later he published again, this time naming his discovery after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 9, 2005
I go to the pain center at our local hospital, and a few times a year we are given a urine test. Last week my urine test came out positive for morphine, and since I don't take morphine, I was wondering what could cause this result. I have a lemon poppy-seed muffin and a cup of coffee for breakfast, a cheese sandwich for lunch with fruit and a normal dinner. I don't take illegal drugs! Your poppy-seed muffin is the most likely culprit. Sensitive drug tests can pick up traces of opium in the poppy seeds, even though you can't get high on a muffin or bagel.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
William Steig, 95, a prolific illustrator for The New Yorker known as the "King of Cartoons" for his award-winning, best-selling children's books including Shrek, died of natural causes of Friday at his home in Boston. Mr. Steig combined a child's innocent eye with idiosyncratic line to create a wonderful world of animal characters for his books and Edwardian-era dandies in his drawings. His 1990 book about a green monster, Shrek, was made into the hit film that in 2002 became the first winner of an Oscar in the new category of best animated feature.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
A baby who became ill after it was mistakenly given morphine at Anne Arundel Medical Center was sent home during the weekend, leaving one of the three newborns from the Jan. 31 incident in the critical-care nursery.The baby went home Saturday and is "A-OK," said Carolyn Shenk, a spokeswoman for the Annapolis hospital.The newborn, which the hospital has declined to identify in any way, had been hospitalized in stable condition since the incident.The first baby was sent home Feb. 6. The third baby remains in stable condition and will be hospitalized for several more months because it was premature and below normal birth weight, Ms. Shenk said.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
A baby who became ill after it was mistakenly given morphine at Anne Arundel Medical Center was sent home during the weekend, leaving one of the three newborns from the Jan. 31 incident in the critical-care nursery.The baby went home Saturday and is "A-OK," said Carolyn Shenk, a spokeswoman for the Annapolis hospital. The newborn, which the hospital has declined to identify in any way, had been hospitalized in stable condition since the incident.The first baby was sent home Feb. 6. The third baby remains in stable condition and will be hospitalized for several more months because it was premature and below normal birth weight, Ms. Shenk said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
A former nurse at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital was linked to a second death yesterday in a lawsuit alleging that a 54-year-old male patient there died because of her actions. The three children of John Lieb of Gaithersburg allege in the suit that nurse Coleen M. Thompson injected the full contents of a "very large syringe" containing morphine into their father's arm, though the doctor's orders were to administer the medicine slowly in drops. Thompson then told the family "that he will pass away in the next half to one hour," according to the wrongful death suit, which was filed with the state Health Claims Arbitration Office and Montgomery County Circuit Court.
NEWS
October 29, 2002
THE WHOLE unhappy episode in Moscow involving Chechens and hostages and knockout gas and the bodies of 116 innocent people was so dispiriting in part because it seemed each side was fatally playing the role long ago assigned to it. First, Chechen gunmen (and gunwomen, in this case) launch a brazen and intolerable attack, one that fully justifies a strong Russian response. But then that response, when it comes, is outrageously violent and indiscriminate, and most of those who suffer from it are completely blameless.
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