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NEWS
September 14, 1995
Tomorrow, Sept. 15, the last issue of The Evening Sun will be published. It will be a souvenir edition with articles, photographs and columns on the paper's 85-year history.Home delivery subscribers of The Evening Sun will automatically begin receiving The Sun on Monday, Sept. 18.The Sun has been redesigned and expanded to better serve both our morning and evening readers. We have incorporated the most popular features of the two papers into the morning paper. A special eight-page section to be delivered with Monday morning's paper will explain the new look and the added features.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 30, 2002
IT WAS a beautiful weekend in the city of Baltimore, if you don't include Anthony Brooks. He was fatally shot in his wheelchair and then buried back on Page 7 of the morning newspaper. The important news was out on Page 1, where the newest census figures showed 15,944 more people packed their bags last year and did not look back at the city, fearing they'd be turned into pillars of salt. Anton Keating noticed some of this, and wished to launch a few hundred balloons to symbolize the troubles: one balloon for each killing of the past year.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 1995
Milwaukee newspapers mergingThe Milwaukee Journal, one of the nation's largest remaining afternoon newspapers, will merge with its morning counterpart, the Milwaukee Sentinel, April 1 and publish as a morning paper, the papers' owner announced Tuesday. The combined newspaper will be named the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.The move reflects rising newspaper production costs, primarily the cost of newsprint, as well as consumers' preference for reading morning newspapers over afternoon newspapers.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Brad Jackson likes to let it all hang out. For instance, the second-year linebacker with the Ravens didn't care about tact three weeks ago, when he approached Tennessee Titans coach Jeff Fisher while waiting for a kickoff. "I told Coach, you might as well call it off - go ahead and let us go to the Super Bowl," said Jackson, who remembers Fisher telling him he had to earn it. He told his former coach that's what the Ravens came to do and, "I'll see you after we win the game."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers John Fairhall and Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | May 26, 1995
News that The Evening Sun will publish for the last time Sept. 15 was met yesterday with sadness and tributes, but little surprise."It's a sad day when your paper dies, even when expected," said Ernie Imhoff, who served for several weeks in 1992 as The Evening Sun's last managing editor after a long career on that paper."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
The Evening Sun publishes its final editions today, a victim of changing times and failing circulation.During its 85-year lifetime, the Baltimore paper gained a national reputation for the social and political commentary of its most famous alumnus, H. L. Mencken. It won a pair of Pulitzer Prizes and helped launch the careers of many talented journalists, including biographer and author William Manchester, and broadcasters Jim McKay and Louis R. Rukeyser.Lively and irreverent in its heyday, The Evening Sun was created by the morning Sun in 1910 to challenge Baltimore's two afternoon papers, the News and the Star.
NEWS
May 5, 1996
To our readers Beginning with today's editions, The Sun will no longer routinely use courtesy titles -- such as Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Miss -- in most news articles. This small but perceptible change in our practice ends a tradition of many years in the morning paper -- The Evening Sun observed a style similar to the one being adopted today. We will, however, continue to use courtesy titles in obituaries and on the opinion pages. It has become increasingly difficult to maintain with consistency what originally was intended as a mark of dignity and respect: We have struggled to accommodate the varied styles by which women now prefer to be addressed.
NEWS
August 29, 1994
MENCKEN for Monday:"But isn't it true that the maladies of middle life are increasing? Maybe they are, but maybe the cause is to be sought, not so much in an exhaustion following over-activity, as in a staleness consequent upon too much ease."-- H. L. Mencken in The Evening Sun, Dec. 16, 1910* * *". . . I roll out of my couch every morning with the most agreeable sensations. In the morning paper there is always massive and exhilarating evidence that the human race, despite its ages-long effort to imitate the seraphim, is still doomed to be irrevocably human, and in my morning mail I always get soothing proof that there are men left who are worse asses than I am."
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Dear Readers,Yesterday, I announced that The Baltimore Sun will launch a completely redesigned morning paper on September 18,1995, featuring expanded and in-depth news coverage better organized for our readers. I also announced that we would cease publication of The Evening Sun on September 15,1995, so that we could reinvest our efforts and resources in the expanded morning paper.I'm sure you've heard this news through the Baltimore media, but as CEO and Publisher of The Baltimore Sun I wanted to also share my thoughts with you directly.
NEWS
May 18, 1997
THE BALTIMORE SUN is always not what it used to be. Change in the way the paper looks, reports and interprets the news has been constant and inexorable. One generation after another laments the loss of what supposedly was better.Such nostalgia is based on myth -- myth conjuring a remembered glow of youth as applied to family, school days, vacations, loves, likes and that most intrusive of commodities: the newspaper that gives its readers a sense of time and place and participation.Actually, The Sun in its early years was a skimpy tabloid-sized concoction filled with patent-medicine ads (on the front page, no less)
NEWS
By Eric Pavlat and Wendy Pavlat | August 9, 2000
WHY do so many people who visit our fair state complain about the humidity? Recently, we've even heard residents -- citizens, even! -- make negative comments about our lovely climate. So, with all due deference to the opinions of the lesser-informed, we would like to present facts which should be self-evident to every thinking individual -- a list of the many benefits and advantages provided by fair Mother Nature in her goodness to us, the denizens of bonnie Maryland. High humidity makes that firm handshake really stick.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 16, 2000
IT IS SUNDAY, and in a matter of hours, the sun will set on your weekend and on your mood. Forty-eight hours of inconsequential busyness -- errands, exercising, kid sports, socializing -- are slipping away with each tick-tick-tick of the "60 Minutes" clock. Sunday evening comes, and you shift into a frantic rush to tie up the weekend's loose ends -- the laundry, the groceries, the paperwork, the homework. There is no place for parties, movies or dinner out on Sunday night, not when you have to gear up for the week ahead.
NEWS
May 18, 1997
THE BALTIMORE SUN is always not what it used to be. Change in the way the paper looks, reports and interprets the news has been constant and inexorable. One generation after another laments the loss of what supposedly was better.Such nostalgia is based on myth -- myth conjuring a remembered glow of youth as applied to family, school days, vacations, loves, likes and that most intrusive of commodities: the newspaper that gives its readers a sense of time and place and participation.Actually, The Sun in its early years was a skimpy tabloid-sized concoction filled with patent-medicine ads (on the front page, no less)
NEWS
May 5, 1996
To our readers Beginning with today's editions, The Sun will no longer routinely use courtesy titles -- such as Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Miss -- in most news articles. This small but perceptible change in our practice ends a tradition of many years in the morning paper -- The Evening Sun observed a style similar to the one being adopted today. We will, however, continue to use courtesy titles in obituaries and on the opinion pages. It has become increasingly difficult to maintain with consistency what originally was intended as a mark of dignity and respect: We have struggled to accommodate the varied styles by which women now prefer to be addressed.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 31, 1995
I have always thought of Herman Maril as an abstract artist -- not in the usual sense of non-representational, but in the dictionary sense of making an abstract, epitomizing or summarizing. The fine exhibit of Maril's work currently at St. John's College in Annapolis only confirms that opinion.Maril (1908-1986) was a Baltimorean whose career spanned six decades, from the late 1920s to his death. The show's 49 paintings and drawings give us as true a picture of Maril's art as we're likely to get, thanks to curator David Scott, an art historian and former director of the National Museum of American Art. He concentrates on a group of major paintings from Maril's later years, when his style was fully developed, but also includes early works and drawings.
NEWS
September 24, 1995
Giving condoms to teens furthers responsibilityI recently read a letter by Kathryn J. Henderson in the Sept. 3, 1995, issue of The Sun. She commented on an article written by Mona Charen entitled, "Shedding Light on Teen Sex." I did not read the original article. However, I do understand what Mrs. Henderson is saying.These girls who are 15 and younger are probably being persuaded to have sex by the older guys, and of course, a young girl is curious. I do not think these girls know what they are getting themselves into when they "experiment" with much older guys, much less trying to obtain money ("on the dole")
NEWS
September 18, 1995
In the Today section, you'll find stylishly written, substantive cover stories, news from the arts, lifestyle and pop;ular culture - and a bigger-than-ever comics package spanning two full pages. Here's what to expect:ComicsThe new Today section combines the most popular comics from the morning and evening papers in a powerful lineup that features 37 strips, more than either paper had before and twice as many as appeared in The Sun.You'll find most of your favorites here, but space limitations made it impossible to keep every strip.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Columnist | September 15, 1995
Newsboys once handed you three separate afternoon newspapers for a buffalo nickel.The 1920s were the glory years of the five-o'clock paper.The Evening Sun, the Baltimore News and the Baltimore Post each possessed a voice, a persoonality and a constituency. From 1872 until today, the daily afternoon newspaper had an unbroken life in Baltimore.It flourished at the hour of the day when the clock's hands said it was time to go home. It functioned within a downtown crowded '' with workers who gushed homeward out of offices, plants and department stores.
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