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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Large Sun Restaurant Critic | May 6, 1994
Morning Edition, a funky little restaurant in Butcher's Hill, is known for its breakfasts; but I'd been hearing good things about dinner there, so I decided to give it a try.There were a few problems.First of all, nobody else was eating there, which always makes me a little nervous. (OK, two other tables were filled over the course of the evening.)And then the setting. Morning Edition would be a charming antique and "junque shoppe," with all its clutter and memorabilia: old Coca-Cola signs, a bit of neon rainbow, collectibles, faded mismatched furniture, dried grapevine entwined with fairy lights.
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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
I could see the headline as soon as I saw the tweet: NPR reports orioles leaving Baltimore. But given Baltimore's history, that would be too much. There's no trifling with teams leaving Baltimore. And we aren't talking about the team, though what a scoop that would be for NPR. This report is in relation to the birds themselves. According to a report on NPR's Morning Edition this morning , a National Audubon Society study says migratory patterns for birds have changed so much due to global warming that the Baltimore region could soon be without the Baltimore oriole, a black and orange bird that symbolizes its baseball club.
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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
National Public Radio announced yesterday that it would replace Bob Edwards of Morning Edition, the public broadcaster's most popular program. "Bob's a voice that millions of Americans have woken up to for 25 years," said Ken Stern, NPR's executive vice president. "That's a voice of authority, a voice of credibility, a voice of community." NPR likes to say Morning Edition is the second most-popular program on radio - after conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh. The change, Stern said, "is about making sure that show can serve the needs of the people in the future."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Jack W. Germond, the irascible, portly columnist and commentator who was a fixture on the American political scene for nearly 50 years, including nearly 20 of them in The Baltimore Sun's Washington bureau, died Wednesday morning of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in Charles Town, W.Va. He was 85. "Jack was a truly dedicated reporter and had an old-fashioned relationship with politicians. He liked them, but that did not prevent him from being critical when they did bad things and behaved badly.
FEATURES
By Neal Rubin and Neal Rubin,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 5, 1992
Washington -- t's 10 minutes short of 6 a.m., and his eyes are puffy, his throat hurts and Bob Edwards is feeling unloved.Maybe it's the hay fever; he's already on his second box of Kleenex. Maybe it's this morning's edition of "Morning Edition," whose less than stirring highlight will be an interview with two economists.Maybe it's wanderlust. Mr. Edwards, a National Public Radio icon for 18 years, was getting ready for a trip to Detroit to escort a flock of his fans to Tiger Stadium and to drop in on a local broadcast of "Morning Edition."
FEATURES
By Karen Ravn and Karen Ravn,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 25, 2005
MONTEREY, Calif. - Does the jilted former host of National Public Radio's Morning Edition ever listen to the show anymore? What a silly question. "Every morning," Bob Edwards said in a recent telephone interview. "Where else am I going to get my news?" And there it was - the famous voice, as thick and smooth as a chocolate milkshake. After 25 years, NPR switched that voice off in spring 2004. Now Edwards' career is up in the air, you might say, but in a good way - on XM Satellite Radio.
FEATURES
By Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
Rudys'Rudys' 2900, 2900 Baltimore Blvd., Finksburg. (410) 833-5777. Rudys' 2900 is not a restaurant to be taken lightly. Its reputation for fine food and service is well deserved. Even on a very busy Saturday night, the food was innovative and delicious and the service professional, pleasant and accommodating. Our waitress even found us a quieter table when we complained about the noise, which proved to be the only drawback to an otherwise fine dinner. Accompanying our entrees was a small salad with to-die-for vinaigrette -- only one of many great tastes at Rudys'.
NEWS
April 30, 2004
WE LIVE IN a fast-paced media world. Radio doesn't talk, it shouts. The television brightly flashes the day's topics in a matter of seconds. Newspapers yearn for the short and punchy. Commentary lunges for the jugular, manic and angry. And then there is Bob Edwards. Do you know this man? For nearly a quarter-century, he has hosted Morning Edition on National Public Radio. He is not an anchor, he is a pillar, his deep baritone voice a steady, calming influence no matter how frightening, how chaotic the day's events.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 2, 1990
Local radio stations continue to be involved in efforts to provide American troops in Saudi Arabia with some of the sounds of home.For example, more than 5,000 audio cassette tapes predominantly featuring the "urban contemporary" sound of WXYV-FM 102.7 were to be delivered today to the U.S. Deployment Center in Mechanicsburg, Pa., for forwarding to troops in the Middle East.V-103's "Operation Desert Sound" was arranged through the efforts of U.S. Rep. Kwesei Mfume, and the tapes came largely from promoters and distributors, according to the station's Jean Ross.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 5, 2004
BOSTON - I suppose the moral of the story is not to mess with people's minds in the morning. Since Bob Edwards, the anchor of National Public Radio's Morning Edition, was given his walking papers last week, listeners have reacted as if the network whisked away their coffee. After 25 years, he's a more familiar presence in many bedrooms than a spouse. He's the alarm clock who modulates the jarring sounds of the morning news, leading us gently from that good night into the dubious day. Now, after being praised as a "true pioneer," he's being given the emeritus post of senior correspondent.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Sunday, July 7, is the 30th anniversary for Morning Edition Cafe in Butchers Hill. It's also its last day. After three decades, Brian Beaven is closing up his Vermont-style cafe, where the specialty was always breakfast, even in the early years when it was also served dinner. When it opened in 1983, Morning Edition was one of the city's first restaurants to specialize in brunch, and few Baltimoreans back then were familiar with the Butchers Hill neighborhood, much less thought of it as a dining destination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Technical difficulties, as they euphemistically say in broadcasting, left some NPR affiliates like Baltimore's WYPR scrambling Monday morning. WYPR confirmed that it had problems with the National Public Radio feed Monday. WTMD General Manager Steve Yasko said he believed there had been problems at his station as well, but he did not have the specifics because his morning team was gone for the day when The Sun called. The trouble started at 6 a.m., according to WYPR's Nathan Sterner, who is on-air from Baltimore weekdays during NPR's "Morning Edition.
FEATURES
By Karen Ravn and Karen Ravn,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 25, 2005
MONTEREY, Calif. - Does the jilted former host of National Public Radio's Morning Edition ever listen to the show anymore? What a silly question. "Every morning," Bob Edwards said in a recent telephone interview. "Where else am I going to get my news?" And there it was - the famous voice, as thick and smooth as a chocolate milkshake. After 25 years, NPR switched that voice off in spring 2004. Now Edwards' career is up in the air, you might say, but in a good way - on XM Satellite Radio.
NEWS
July 29, 2004
WORLD Deaths top 100 for day in Iraq In a deadly day across Iraq, a car bomb tore through a crowd applying for police work in Baqouba, killing at least 68 Iraqis in the deadliest attack since Iraq regained sovereignty. Fighting south of Baghdad left seven Iraqi police officers and 35 insurgents dead. [Page 1a] Yukos warning shakes oil market Yukos, Russia's besieged oil giant, warned that it might be forced to stop exporting oil, rattling world oil markets and driving the price of crude to its highest level in 21 years.
NEWS
April 30, 2004
WE LIVE IN a fast-paced media world. Radio doesn't talk, it shouts. The television brightly flashes the day's topics in a matter of seconds. Newspapers yearn for the short and punchy. Commentary lunges for the jugular, manic and angry. And then there is Bob Edwards. Do you know this man? For nearly a quarter-century, he has hosted Morning Edition on National Public Radio. He is not an anchor, he is a pillar, his deep baritone voice a steady, calming influence no matter how frightening, how chaotic the day's events.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - It is about 20 past 3 on a chilly morning earlier this week, and Bob Edwards has already been in his office for more than an hour. He is sitting, alone, before an aging electric typewriter, his shoulders slightly hunched as he pounds out scripts on yellow pages, much as he has for nearly 25 years now. As Edwards has said thousands of times, this is Morning Edition on National Public Radio. The show's longtime host relies upon a daily collaborative miracle that marries journalism and engineering, his live narration of news stories blending with taped interviews, stories from reporters and musical segues.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 1, 1991
National Public Radio affiliates have contributed $582,000 to the network in the last three weeks, enabling it to continue its expanded Persian Gulf coverage "for the foreseeable future."Even though a cease-fire has been declared, events in the region will still be a "big story in terms of the aftermath of the war," said NPR spokeswoman Mary Morgan.Since the war began, NPR has spent nearly $500,000 on additional reporters, more satellite time and overtime at its Washington studios for Persian Gulf coverage, Ms. Morgan said.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
I could see the headline as soon as I saw the tweet: NPR reports orioles leaving Baltimore. But given Baltimore's history, that would be too much. There's no trifling with teams leaving Baltimore. And we aren't talking about the team, though what a scoop that would be for NPR. This report is in relation to the birds themselves. According to a report on NPR's Morning Edition this morning , a National Audubon Society study says migratory patterns for birds have changed so much due to global warming that the Baltimore region could soon be without the Baltimore oriole, a black and orange bird that symbolizes its baseball club.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 5, 2004
BOSTON - I suppose the moral of the story is not to mess with people's minds in the morning. Since Bob Edwards, the anchor of National Public Radio's Morning Edition, was given his walking papers last week, listeners have reacted as if the network whisked away their coffee. After 25 years, he's a more familiar presence in many bedrooms than a spouse. He's the alarm clock who modulates the jarring sounds of the morning news, leading us gently from that good night into the dubious day. Now, after being praised as a "true pioneer," he's being given the emeritus post of senior correspondent.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
National Public Radio announced yesterday that it would replace Bob Edwards of Morning Edition, the public broadcaster's most popular program. "Bob's a voice that millions of Americans have woken up to for 25 years," said Ken Stern, NPR's executive vice president. "That's a voice of authority, a voice of credibility, a voice of community." NPR likes to say Morning Edition is the second most-popular program on radio - after conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh. The change, Stern said, "is about making sure that show can serve the needs of the people in the future."
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