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Mormon Missionaries

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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
At an age when most recent high school graduates are busy deciding which job to take or which college to attend, two Taneytown residents are prepared to spend two years as missionaries for their church.Kyle Stephenson, 19, of Tuscarora Trail and Shauna Bere, 20, of Carnival Drive have decided to join the missionary program of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Mr. Stephenson left Monday for a missionary training program in Provo, Utah -- where he will stay for two months until he heads to Rosario, Argentina.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | April 27, 2012
Jokes about polygamy and funny long underwear aside, Mitt Romney's Mormon faith has not been, and will not become, a factor in the presidential campaign of 2012. I have a friend who wishes that were not so. She thinks it's creepy that Mormons comb genealogical records to find people to retroactively baptize into the church -- people who were not Mormons when they were alive and probably would not want to be Mormons if they still were. Knowing that the one constant in Mr. Romney's otherwise malleable set of beliefs is his religion, my friend cannot understand why the Obama campaign has not raised the oddities of Mormonism as an issue.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1995
While walking the streets of West Baltimore recently, young Brigham Colton, a Mormon missionary, found himself standing between two men who were completing a sidewalk drug deal.L Then he had the feeling he wasn't in Salt Lake City anymore."I often think," says the cherubic-looking 19-year-old, "how different it is here."As dismaying as the sight was, Elder Colton did not dwell on the spectacle. Just as his missionary partner, Shane Campbell, did not long ponder the body he happened on one day in Pimlico.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
If your party nominated a generally well-qualified person for president who happened to be Mormon, would you vote for that person? Earlier this year, Gallup pollsters asked that exact question, and 76 percent of those who responded said yes, they would. That may sound like the American people are ready for a president who is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but maybe not. In the same poll, the public was given other hypothetical candidates: Would you vote for a black, Catholic, Baptist, Jew or Hispanic?
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2001
THEY ARE MORMON missionaries, and they believe in sharing their faith. Sometimes that means going overseas. Sometimes that means going to Crofton. Meet Elder Dohrman. The 21-year-old California man's brother is a missionary in Argentina. One friend was a missionary in Thailand, another in Japan. Dohrman is happy to have been sent to Crofton to study, pray and spread his church's word. "I love it here," he says of his new home. For several months, he and three young missionary colleagues from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have been living in a Crofton apartment.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
If your party nominated a generally well-qualified person for president who happened to be Mormon, would you vote for that person? Earlier this year, Gallup pollsters asked that exact question, and 76 percent of those who responded said yes, they would. That may sound like the American people are ready for a president who is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but maybe not. In the same poll, the public was given other hypothetical candidates: Would you vote for a black, Catholic, Baptist, Jew or Hispanic?
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 27, 2012
Jokes about polygamy and funny long underwear aside, Mitt Romney's Mormon faith has not been, and will not become, a factor in the presidential campaign of 2012. I have a friend who wishes that were not so. She thinks it's creepy that Mormons comb genealogical records to find people to retroactively baptize into the church -- people who were not Mormons when they were alive and probably would not want to be Mormons if they still were. Knowing that the one constant in Mr. Romney's otherwise malleable set of beliefs is his religion, my friend cannot understand why the Obama campaign has not raised the oddities of Mormonism as an issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Staff | March 20, 2005
The city wore the soles off his shoes, two pairs of them. For half a year, Jared Atkinson hiked Bibles out to the East Baltimore projects and bicycled The Book of Mormon into the streets of Sandtown, past hooded dealers and dead rats to blocks of rowhouses, bricked up and boarded over. The strain told on the 21-year-old missionary. Sometimes during prayer, his posture hardened into a wrestler's crouch. He'd come 3,000 miles from California orchard country to save souls in Baltimore, but six months into his city mission, he hadn't baptized a single person.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
When Steven Lundberg was 19, he began serving a 2 1/2-year mission in Germany -- going door-to-door spreading the teachings of his Mormon religion, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Now a colonel stationed at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Lundberg, 55, serves as bishop to one of the congregations that meet at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints building in Ellicott City. The church is home to three congregations, or wards, in the area. Two wards come from Columbia and the other is from the Catonsville/Ellicott City area.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2001
At a time in life when the typical young person is self-consumed, 20-year-old Clarence E. Johnson was knocking on doors in rural Mississippi, telling people about the saving power of Jesus Christ. Johnson, now 61, has dedicated his life to serving God and recently was appointed Columbia stake president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is underscored by his vision: "If I were somehow able to persuade people that they are children of God and that he loves them and desires to bless them, and if I could somehow help people understand how significant that really is, that is what I'd like to accomplish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Staff | March 20, 2005
The city wore the soles off his shoes, two pairs of them. For half a year, Jared Atkinson hiked Bibles out to the East Baltimore projects and bicycled The Book of Mormon into the streets of Sandtown, past hooded dealers and dead rats to blocks of rowhouses, bricked up and boarded over. The strain told on the 21-year-old missionary. Sometimes during prayer, his posture hardened into a wrestler's crouch. He'd come 3,000 miles from California orchard country to save souls in Baltimore, but six months into his city mission, he hadn't baptized a single person.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2001
THEY ARE MORMON missionaries, and they believe in sharing their faith. Sometimes that means going overseas. Sometimes that means going to Crofton. Meet Elder Dohrman. The 21-year-old California man's brother is a missionary in Argentina. One friend was a missionary in Thailand, another in Japan. Dohrman is happy to have been sent to Crofton to study, pray and spread his church's word. "I love it here," he says of his new home. For several months, he and three young missionary colleagues from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have been living in a Crofton apartment.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2001
At a time in life when the typical young person is self-consumed, 20-year-old Clarence E. Johnson was knocking on doors in rural Mississippi, telling people about the saving power of Jesus Christ. Johnson, now 61, has dedicated his life to serving God and recently was appointed Columbia stake president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is underscored by his vision: "If I were somehow able to persuade people that they are children of God and that he loves them and desires to bless them, and if I could somehow help people understand how significant that really is, that is what I'd like to accomplish.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
When Steven Lundberg was 19, he began serving a 2 1/2-year mission in Germany -- going door-to-door spreading the teachings of his Mormon religion, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Now a colonel stationed at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Lundberg, 55, serves as bishop to one of the congregations that meet at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints building in Ellicott City. The church is home to three congregations, or wards, in the area. Two wards come from Columbia and the other is from the Catonsville/Ellicott City area.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1995
While walking the streets of West Baltimore recently, young Brigham Colton, a Mormon missionary, found himself standing between two men who were completing a sidewalk drug deal.L Then he had the feeling he wasn't in Salt Lake City anymore."I often think," says the cherubic-looking 19-year-old, "how different it is here."As dismaying as the sight was, Elder Colton did not dwell on the spectacle. Just as his missionary partner, Shane Campbell, did not long ponder the body he happened on one day in Pimlico.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
At an age when most recent high school graduates are busy deciding which job to take or which college to attend, two Taneytown residents are prepared to spend two years as missionaries for their church.Kyle Stephenson, 19, of Tuscarora Trail and Shauna Bere, 20, of Carnival Drive have decided to join the missionary program of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Mr. Stephenson left Monday for a missionary training program in Provo, Utah -- where he will stay for two months until he heads to Rosario, Argentina.
NEWS
By Karoun Demirjian and Karoun Demirjian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 20, 2007
Taxation Without Representation" - emblazoned on District of Columbia license plates - could be on its way out. The House voted 241-177 yesterday to give the District a voting representative in Congress. "This has been a 206-year labor of love," said Eleanor Holmes Norton, a nonvoting delegate who represents Washington's 550,000 people. However, the fate of the measure is uncertain in the Senate, where Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, a Connecticut Democrat, is expected to introduce a version of the bill soon.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 9, 1996
When you saw that your new laser-disc player came with a built-in karaoke module, you chuckled, thinking, "As if I'd ever invest in a microphone and karaoke disc." But the manufacturer was one step ahead of you and included not only a microphone but a five-song karaoke sampler disc in the packaging.So, feeling only slightly foolish, you looked around to make sure all the windows were closed, and slipped the disc in. "Just to see if the thing works," you told yourself.But when the karaoke version of "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" came on, you couldn't help yourself.
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