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NEWS
April 17, 1994
The United States will not soon get satisfaction in its trade dispute with Japan and will have to delay ultimatums about sanctions. At the moment, there is no one in Japan with the authority to make concessions, and it may be a prolonged moment. The resignation of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa leaves confusion and weakness at least until a successor is named, and probably longer. Meanwhile, the system moves along under the lubrication of the powerful bureaucracy, which can do everything but change.
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NEWS
April 17, 1994
The United States will not soon get satisfaction in its trade dispute with Japan and will have to delay ultimatums about sanctions. At the moment, there is no one in Japan with the authority to make concessions, and it may be a prolonged moment. The resignation of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa leaves confusion and weakness at least until a successor is named, and probably longer. Meanwhile, the system moves along under the lubrication of the powerful bureaucracy, which can do everything but change.
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NEWS
August 25, 1993
Morihiro Hosokawa probably will not remain prime minister of Japan long, but he is making the most of his brief experience at the head of a fragile eight-party coalition dedicated to radical reform. So far, his changes are of style and rhetoric. But they break taboos, and the taboos are likely to remain superseded after Mr. Hosokawa has left the scene.In a press conference and in his first policy speech to the parliament, Mr. Hosokawa apologized for Japanese imperialism in the 1930s and 1940s.
NEWS
August 25, 1993
Morihiro Hosokawa probably will not remain prime minister of Japan long, but he is making the most of his brief experience at the head of a fragile eight-party coalition dedicated to radical reform. So far, his changes are of style and rhetoric. But they break taboos, and the taboos are likely to remain superseded after Mr. Hosokawa has left the scene.In a press conference and in his first policy speech to the parliament, Mr. Hosokawa apologized for Japanese imperialism in the 1930s and 1940s.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 22, 1993
Paris. -- A''new world order'' is slowly emerging which has nothing to do with the American global hegemony discussed -- even celebrated -- by Washington during George Bush's time in the White House.There is now a parallel and reciprocal estrangement of Americans from Japan and from Europe -- once again ''fortress Europe'' in Washington eyes. This estrangement is fundamentally economic, related to trade rivalries, but Japan's national election Sunday revealed the important political dimension it possesses.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 2, 1992
TOKYO -- The phone rang just before midnight one Sunday in May, and a stranger was on Yoshio "Terry" Terasawa's line."When I hung up, my wife said, 'I can guess what he wanted, and I want you to know this -- if you become a politician, I promise I'll divorce you,' " he recalled.Twelve weeks after that May conversation, Mr. Terasawa is putting his apartment at the Watergate in Washington on the market and leaving behind 17 years spent as a Wall Street executive and four as a senior World Bank executive.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 24, 1993
The city parks department quit mowing the grass and calls it ecological enlightenment. Don't try that in your yard or the whole property owners association will be on your neck.Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa talked a good game to Japan's parliament. He won't be there long, so he can afford to say the right thing.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993
Japan weighs cutting regulationsIn its first effort to reduce the government's power over Japan's minutely regulated economy, a commission appointed by Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday called for the elimination or easing of 475 regulations governing the nation's legal and economic systems.The proposals, which were in an interim report hastily prepared so that Mr. Hosokawa can present it to President Clinton this month at a meeting in Seattle, were ambitious but conspicuous in their lack of details.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 24, 1993
TOKYO -- Six of seven opposition parties that could form a coalition in Japan for the first time since 1948 appeared to reach agreement yesterday on reforms that would form the basis of a non-Liberal Democratic Party government.Leaders of two key parties announced that they would demand acceptance of a reform plan as the price of their support in a coalition.The two parties, the Japan New Party and the New Party Harbinger, hold decisive parliamentary votes in the alliance against the Liberal Democrats, who fell 29 seats below a majority in last Sunday's election.
NEWS
August 11, 1993
With the formal election of Morihiro Hosokawa as prime minister, the new Japanese government needs to start implementing its shaky mandate. The coalition of eight parties that narrowly won last month's elections has made it clear what it is against: continued rule by the long-dominant Liberal Democrats. Now it has to show what it is for. Ousting the Liberal Democrats after 38 years of unbroken rule was difficult enough; governing Japan afterward will be more so.The election result was as much a self-inflicted wound by the Liberal Democrats as it was a political victory for the disparate melange of parties that make up the governing coalition.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 22, 1993
Paris. -- A''new world order'' is slowly emerging which has nothing to do with the American global hegemony discussed -- even celebrated -- by Washington during George Bush's time in the White House.There is now a parallel and reciprocal estrangement of Americans from Japan and from Europe -- once again ''fortress Europe'' in Washington eyes. This estrangement is fundamentally economic, related to trade rivalries, but Japan's national election Sunday revealed the important political dimension it possesses.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 2, 1992
TOKYO -- The phone rang just before midnight one Sunday in May, and a stranger was on Yoshio "Terry" Terasawa's line."When I hung up, my wife said, 'I can guess what he wanted, and I want you to know this -- if you become a politician, I promise I'll divorce you,' " he recalled.Twelve weeks after that May conversation, Mr. Terasawa is putting his apartment at the Watergate in Washington on the market and leaving behind 17 years spent as a Wall Street executive and four as a senior World Bank executive.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 9, 1993
TOKYO -- In its first effort to reduce the government's power over Japan's minutely regulated economy, a commission appointed by Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday called for the elimination or easing of 475 regulations governing the nation's legal and economic systems.The proposals, which were in an interim report hastily prepared tTC so that Mr. Hosokawa can present it to President Clinton this month at a planned meeting in Seattle, were ambitious but conspicuous in their lack of details.
NEWS
February 15, 1994
Politically, President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa scored heavily by bluntly disagreeing on trade issues and threatening a cross-fire of retaliation. But economically, the two leaders hardly acted like the mature grown-ups they pronounced themselves to be in ratcheting up candor to the point of jingoism.The Japanese were the first to learn. After a weekend of chest-thumping about "little brother" finally standing up to "big brother," the Tokyo stock market plunged.
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