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NEWS
By Albany Times Union | November 18, 1994
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Everyone thought 83-year-old Mildred C. Clarke was dead.After city rescue squad members examined her, a coroner pronounced her dead. She was zipped into a body bag and shipped to the morgue at Albany Medical Center Hospital. There she was kept in a cooler at 40 degrees for about 90 minutes.But when funeral home attendants came to pick up her body, a morgue attendant who slid her out of the cooler was startled to find that Ms. Clarke was very much alive.Ms. Clarke was recovering Wednesday night at the hospital.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 28, 2007
Thesunlies.com - a site devoted to trashing Baltimore's largest daily - seems to have called it quits. The site had been around at least since last spring, and in its heyday, it ripped three or more Sun articles a day - mostly over perceived anti-Bob Ehrlich, pro-Martin O'Malley bias. But the zip seemed to go out of the whole thing after the election, and sometime last week, it expired. That fueled conspiracy theories that the site was the work of a conservative operation that recently folded up its tent.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | November 19, 1991
For nine days, they didn't know he had died.While Sandy Bowman and Marcie Barnes thought their 80-year-old grandfather was recuperating in a nursing home, his body was lying in the morgue at North Arundel Hospital.The granddaughters were shocked when a doctor called last Thursday to tell them their grandfather, Clyde Young, had died in the emergency room more than a week earlier.Outraged by what they consider "careless" and "negligent" behavior, the women are urging the Glen Burnie hospital to improve its policies on informing relatives about a death.
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Baghdad's morgue received 1,091 homicide victims in April, most from sectarian killings that have become "no less dangerous than terrorism," Iraq's president said yesterday. "These daily crimes will create an environment of mutual suspicion between the nation's sons and destabilize our national unity," President Jalal Talabani warned in a statement issued by his office. Each victim leaves behind "an orphan, weeping mother, a suffering father or a suffering wife," he said.
NEWS
By DAVID ZUCCHINO AND NICHOLAS RICCARDI and DAVID ZUCCHINO AND NICHOLAS RICCARDI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
BATON ROUGE, La. -- When he could finally leave his post guarding a nuclear power plant after Hurricane Katrina struck, Richard George Reysack III sped to the flooded home of his 80-year-old father east of New Orleans. Slogging through the muck, he found his father's corpse face-down in the hallway. As devastating as that discovery was, at least Reysack had his father's remains. Then even that was taken away. The authorities who moved the corpse to a temporary morgue not only won't return it to Reysack for burial, he said, but they won't even confirm that they have it. Reysack's family has published an obituary and held a memorial service - all without a body.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 1995
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Alija Hodzic steps to a cabinet in the morgue, pulls out a green ledger and reads from Evidencija Ulaz Umrlih, the book of the dead."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- The dead still outnumber the living at the county morgue, but that may not hold true forever if sales keep booming at the gift shop.The Los Angeles County Coroner's Office handles 19,000 bodies and serves 1,000 living customers a year browsing for such articles as a $20 beach towel emblazoned with a chalk outline of a body.Talked up from People to Playboy, the shop called Skeletons in the Closet has expanded to an office with a full-time staff of one and has sold the rights to market its name in Japan, where homicide in America plays as a dime-store novelty.
NEWS
By John F. Burns and John F. Burns,New York Times News Service | August 2, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- After a military offensive that failed to break the Serbian siege lines around Sarajevo, Bosnian government troops fell back yesterday to a city plunged in gloom over the heavy costs of the abortive breakout and the narrowing options that the failure appeared to have left to the city's defenders.After 36 hours of intensive fighting on the hills to the north of the city, the battle subsided yesterday with Serbian nationalist forces still hemming the Bosnians in as they have since the siege began nearly four months ago.The Bosnian forces, fighting with light weapons against the heavy guns of the Serbs, appear to have made only modest inroads into the Serbian lines, and at a devastating cost to themselves.
NEWS
By David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko and David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2005
ANDIJAN, Uzbekistan - Sanjab Valiakhunov's family can't find him, no matter how hard they search. "In the last three days, I was everywhere. I was at the morgue, at the hospital. He's not there," his sister, Rakhat Valiakhunov, said yesterday, in despair after clashes in Andijan last week left a death toll of at least 169 by official count. "They didn't let me into the morgue, though," she said. "They just said, `Your brother is not here,' as if they know my brother. Or maybe they just don't have any bodies in the morgue and don't want to admit it. I know that many families have been going around town looking for their loved ones and can't find them."
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Baghdad's morgue received 1,091 homicide victims in April, most from sectarian killings that have become "no less dangerous than terrorism," Iraq's president said yesterday. "These daily crimes will create an environment of mutual suspicion between the nation's sons and destabilize our national unity," President Jalal Talabani warned in a statement issued by his office. Each victim leaves behind "an orphan, weeping mother, a suffering father or a suffering wife," he said.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
For the Deamer family, the slow pace of accounting for the victims of Hurricane Katrina has brought a succession of dashed hopes and heartbreaking discoveries. After weeks of anxious phone calls, they learned in late September that a search team had found the body of an elderly man in the New Orleans home where Leslie Deamer Sr., 92, lived with his 85-year-old sister, Ella Marie. Relatives thought the body would be removed and quickly identified. They held out hope that Ella Marie might turn up alive.
NEWS
By DAVID ZUCCHINO AND NICHOLAS RICCARDI and DAVID ZUCCHINO AND NICHOLAS RICCARDI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
BATON ROUGE, La. -- When he could finally leave his post guarding a nuclear power plant after Hurricane Katrina struck, Richard George Reysack III sped to the flooded home of his 80-year-old father east of New Orleans. Slogging through the muck, he found his father's corpse face-down in the hallway. As devastating as that discovery was, at least Reysack had his father's remains. Then even that was taken away. The authorities who moved the corpse to a temporary morgue not only won't return it to Reysack for burial, he said, but they won't even confirm that they have it. Reysack's family has published an obituary and held a memorial service - all without a body.
NEWS
By David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko and David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2005
ANDIJAN, Uzbekistan - Sanjab Valiakhunov's family can't find him, no matter how hard they search. "In the last three days, I was everywhere. I was at the morgue, at the hospital. He's not there," his sister, Rakhat Valiakhunov, said yesterday, in despair after clashes in Andijan last week left a death toll of at least 169 by official count. "They didn't let me into the morgue, though," she said. "They just said, `Your brother is not here,' as if they know my brother. Or maybe they just don't have any bodies in the morgue and don't want to admit it. I know that many families have been going around town looking for their loved ones and can't find them."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 12, 2005
BASICALLY, you want to live. You want to live as long as possible, in as much good health as possible. You want to enjoy all the benefits of a free society, including microwaveable popcorn. You do not want to go to jail. Generally speaking, you want to live life as most of us know it -- working, playing and loving through four seasons of the year, out here in the open (if not pollution-free) air, pursuing some dream of financial stability, if not affluence, a relatively happy family life and maybe even a sense of accomplishment.
NEWS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed and Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2004
AD DAWR, Iraq - As U.S.-led forces consolidated their control over rebellious Samarra yesterday, humanitarian officials described a hellish scene in the city after a two-day offensive by 5,000 U.S. and Iraqi troops. The morgue in Samarra's main hospital was overflowing, requiring corpses to be laid on the floor in an unrefrigerated hall, said Nura abid Bakir, director of the Red Crescent branch in the northern province of Salahuddin, where Samarra is located. She cited reports from Red Crescent volunteers who had visited the hospital.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Luis Maria Paredes and Hector Tobar and Luis Maria Paredes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2004
ASUNCION, Paraguay - At least 256 people were killed yesterday after a propane gas tank exploded inside a crowded supermarket here, igniting a fast-moving fire that left a crowd of shoppers trapped behind doors that may have been locked to prevent looting. Witnesses said the explosion took place about noon in a basement food-court kitchen where families had gathered for lunch in the modern, mall-size market. Officials said many bodies were yet to be recovered and the death toll could surpass 300, making the blaze among the deadliest in recent South American history.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | September 24, 2000
"The Morgue" - DOWN - A's manager Art Howe blistered Camden Yards as a body storage facility after only 2,000 attended Wednesday's day portion of a split doubleheader. Hmm. Sounds like an average A's home date on a promotion night. Grover - UP - Manager Mike Hargrove blistered his team's listless performance Monday night in which giving an effort appeared optional. The effort returned. Forget about the hitting. Coaching intrigue - UP - After a 90-loss season, someone's gonna go. It won't be the front office and it won't be the manager.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
For the Deamer family, the slow pace of accounting for the victims of Hurricane Katrina has brought a succession of dashed hopes and heartbreaking discoveries. After weeks of anxious phone calls, they learned in late September that a search team had found the body of an elderly man in the New Orleans home where Leslie Deamer Sr., 92, lived with his 85-year-old sister, Ella Marie. Relatives thought the body would be removed and quickly identified. They held out hope that Ella Marie might turn up alive.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
It's time to start our love affair with Homicide: Life on the Street all over again. A DVD boxed set of Homicide's first two seasons, being released by A&E Home Video today, offers the chance to get reacquainted with Pembleton, Munch, Bolander, Howard and all the exhilaratingly flawed characters that made the show so intoxicating. Not to mention the myriad Baltimore locations that made it so ... ours. Airing on NBC from 1993-2000, the show didn't so much change the face of television as redirect it. It utilized a visual vocabulary that relied on hand-held cameras and location shooting for verisimilitude; story lines that concentrated on the everyday nature of police work, not the flash; and characters who lived in a world that could be as mundane as it was exciting, frequently more so. And it was all shot right here in Charm City, at a recycled rec pier in Fells Point, the ancient Baltimore Cemetery at the east end of North Avenue, Camden Yards, Patterson Park, the city morgue - over the course of seven years, there weren't many areas around these parts that the filmmakers didn't visit at least once.
NEWS
By Robert Lee Hotz and Robert Lee Hotz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
NEW YORK - When the first hijacked airliner hit the World Trade Center, Dr. Robert Shaler was holding his regular Tuesday morning staff meeting to plan the workload for the 90 forensic experts under his direction at New York's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. After almost 14 years in the medical examiner's office, Shaler is no stranger to the confusion that fogs the circumstances of violent death. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, led by Dr. Charles Hirsch, is the country's busiest, handling 25,000 deaths a year, including 3,300 homicides and sexual assaults.
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