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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | March 21, 1999
The King and I" may not seem a likely story for animation, and turning the king into a damsel-saving superhero may strike some moviegoers as blasphemy, but producer James G. Robinson isn't all that concerned.For the film executive, whose Baltimore-based Morgan Creek Productions has been putting out films since 1988, has a certain audience in mind. And if you've moved beyond middle school, you're not it."While we stay with the heart of the story, this film has been designed for basically children," Robinson says during an interview in Morgan Creek's Baltimore office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | March 21, 1999
The King and I" may not seem a likely story for animation, and turning the king into a damsel-saving superhero may strike some moviegoers as blasphemy, but producer James G. Robinson isn't all that concerned.For the film executive, whose Baltimore-based Morgan Creek Productions has been putting out films since 1988, has a certain audience in mind. And if you've moved beyond middle school, you're not it."While we stay with the heart of the story, this film has been designed for basically children," Robinson says during an interview in Morgan Creek's Baltimore office.
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NEWS
September 17, 1993
Only a few years ago, it was a novel experience for Marylanders to watch movies like "Tin Men" or "The Accidental Tourist" and spot familiar locations on the big screen. As Maryland becomes an increasingly popular film location, the thrill is becoming more common.The latest example is the summer hit "Sleepless in Seattle," in which Meg Ryan plays a Baltimore Sun feature writer destined for romance with a Seattle widower. With the announcement this week of a two-film commitment from Morgan Creek Pictures, Maryland moves up another notch on the list of preferred locations.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
KENNEDYVILLE -- Pat Langenfelder got a preview yesterday morning of the environmental scrutiny that all large Maryland livestock farms might face in the near future.About 25 inspector trainees with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental offices of surrounding states converged on her Kent County farm.They were looking for evidence of harmful byproducts from the manure streaming from the 2,400-hog operation. Those byproducts could seep into the waters of nearby Morgan Creek and eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay.The inspector trainees looked at the mustard-green slime produced from the flow of hog manure from a breeding barn into a 1 1/2 -acre storage lagoon.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | June 16, 1991
In Baltimore, auto import executive James G. Robinson is a stranger to the media. In Hollywood, he is their darling.A former Dundalk car washer, Mr. Robinson spends half his days quietly running his import business at the Dundalk Marine Terminal. The other half he spends with the likes of super box office draw Kevin Costner, the lead in this summer's movie mega-event, "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves."He travels with Steven Ross, chairman of Time Warner Inc., whose Warner Bros. movie studio is distributing the Costner movie.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
The annual Calvert Hall-Loyola football game will take place as scheduled at Memorial Stadium on Thanksgiving Day, thanks to some juggling by state Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski and Morgan Creek Productions owner Jim Robinson.The game, entering its 76th year, was in jeopardy of being moved because the stadium is under contract until December for filming of Morgan Creek's "Major League II." That was before Miedusiewski, a 1967 Calvert Hall graduate, appealed to Robinson's hometown sensibilities.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 24, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- The French will be getting the jump on Michael Mann's "The Last of the Mohicans," starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Madeleine Stowe, when the movie opens there Wednesday -- a full month before its American release.The $35 million historical drama -- a romance between a frontiersman (the adopted son of a Mohican) and the independent daughter of a British officer during the French and Indian wars -- was scheduled to open in the United States on July 4 and in France Wednesday. Complications set in, however, when the film's distributor, 20th Century Fox, pushed back the American opening to extricate the film from the summer action-adventure glut and better position it for Oscar consideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 20, 1991
Bill Payne likes the idea of Little Feat being a big fish in a small pond. That's why he's happy that his band, which spent almost 20 years as part of the mammoth Warner Bros. stable, is now the flagship act of the newly formed Morgan Creek Records."Any Little Feat fan can tell you that Little Feat probably deserves a customized plan," he says, speaking over the phone from a tour stop in Portland, Maine. "They feel the group is unique -- and it is. There are not very many bands that can put a country/western tune right up against a jazz song and get away with it."
FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
In the spirit of Barry Levinson and John Waters, another native son is focusing his cameras on Baltimore and Maryland this fall.James G. Robinson, chief executive officer of Morgan Creek Productions, will shoot two major Hollywood feature films here -- beginning this month. One is a comedy sequel, "Major League II," and the other an untitled mystery directed by Oscar-winner Bruce Beresford.Mr. Robinson, who lives in Baltimore County and commutes weekly to Los Angeles, estimated the two movies will pump millions of dollars into the Maryland economy.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
KENNEDYVILLE -- Pat Langenfelder got a preview yesterday morning of the environmental scrutiny that all large Maryland livestock farms might face in the near future.About 25 inspector trainees with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental offices of surrounding states converged on her Kent County farm.They were looking for evidence of harmful byproducts from the manure streaming from the 2,400-hog operation. Those byproducts could seep into the waters of nearby Morgan Creek and eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay.The inspector trainees looked at the mustard-green slime produced from the flow of hog manure from a breeding barn into a 1 1/2 -acre storage lagoon.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
The annual Calvert Hall-Loyola football game will take place as scheduled at Memorial Stadium on Thanksgiving Day, thanks to some juggling by state Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski and Morgan Creek Productions owner Jim Robinson.The game, entering its 76th year, was in jeopardy of being moved because the stadium is under contract until December for filming of Morgan Creek's "Major League II." That was before Miedusiewski, a 1967 Calvert Hall graduate, appealed to Robinson's hometown sensibilities.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
Only a few years ago, it was a novel experience for Marylanders to watch movies like "Tin Men" or "The Accidental Tourist" and spot familiar locations on the big screen. As Maryland becomes an increasingly popular film location, the thrill is becoming more common.The latest example is the summer hit "Sleepless in Seattle," in which Meg Ryan plays a Baltimore Sun feature writer destined for romance with a Seattle widower. With the announcement this week of a two-film commitment from Morgan Creek Pictures, Maryland moves up another notch on the list of preferred locations.
FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
In the spirit of Barry Levinson and John Waters, another native son is focusing his cameras on Baltimore and Maryland this fall.James G. Robinson, chief executive officer of Morgan Creek Productions, will shoot two major Hollywood feature films here -- beginning this month. One is a comedy sequel, "Major League II," and the other an untitled mystery directed by Oscar-winner Bruce Beresford.Mr. Robinson, who lives in Baltimore County and commutes weekly to Los Angeles, estimated the two movies will pump millions of dollars into the Maryland economy.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 24, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- The French will be getting the jump on Michael Mann's "The Last of the Mohicans," starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Madeleine Stowe, when the movie opens there Wednesday -- a full month before its American release.The $35 million historical drama -- a romance between a frontiersman (the adopted son of a Mohican) and the independent daughter of a British officer during the French and Indian wars -- was scheduled to open in the United States on July 4 and in France Wednesday. Complications set in, however, when the film's distributor, 20th Century Fox, pushed back the American opening to extricate the film from the summer action-adventure glut and better position it for Oscar consideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 20, 1991
Bill Payne likes the idea of Little Feat being a big fish in a small pond. That's why he's happy that his band, which spent almost 20 years as part of the mammoth Warner Bros. stable, is now the flagship act of the newly formed Morgan Creek Records."Any Little Feat fan can tell you that Little Feat probably deserves a customized plan," he says, speaking over the phone from a tour stop in Portland, Maine. "They feel the group is unique -- and it is. There are not very many bands that can put a country/western tune right up against a jazz song and get away with it."
BUSINESS
By David Conn | June 16, 1991
In Baltimore, auto import executive James G. Robinson is a stranger to the media. In Hollywood, he is their darling.A former Dundalk car washer, Mr. Robinson spends half his days quietly running his import business at the Dundalk Marine Terminal. The other half he spends with the likes of super box office draw Kevin Costner, the lead in this summer's movie mega-event, "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves."He travels with Steven Ross, chairman of Time Warner Inc., whose Warner Bros. movie studio is distributing the Costner movie.
NEWS
February 24, 2003
Jack Brodsky, 69, a Hollywood publicist and producer of popular films including Romancing the Stone and its sequel The Jewel of the Nile, starring Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner, died Tuesday at his Los Angeles home of a heart attack. Mr. Brodsky, who recently produced the Eddie Murphy film Daddy Day Care planned for release this year, was equally adept at publicity and producing. He worked as an executive for 20th Century Fox, Filmways, Columbia, Morgan Creek and Rastar after starting out in the New York office of Warner Bros.
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