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By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
A bill that would have imposed a moratorium on the use of hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas in Maryland was defeated Wednesday night in a Senate committee. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 6-5 to reject the bill, which would have barred "fracking" in the state until the state Department of the Environment completes a study of the practice's environmental impact and issues appropriate rules. The bill was sponsored by Sen. Robert A. Zirkin, a Baltimore County Democrat.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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NEWS
September 24, 2012
The letter from Steve Everley, a member of a research organization supported by the Independent Petroleum Institute of America ("Fracking gets an unfair rap," Sept. 21), is a bit misleading when it says that the moratorium on fracking "is just another way to obscure the fact that hydraulic fracturing has been examined, studied, assessed, and closely scrutinized for decades. " While it's true that hydraulic fracturing has been used and studied for decades, high-volume slick-water fracturing has been used only in about the past dozen years, and only in 2011 did the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency begin to respond to concerns that fracking was causing problems when they received many complaints from Pennsylvanians who were badly impacted by it. On Feb. 28, 2011, Ian Urbana, an investigative reporter for the New York Times, wrote that he found never-reported studies by the EPA and a confidential study by the drilling industry that all concluded that radioactivity in drilling waste cannot be fully diluted in rivers and other waterways.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 21, 2014
Angus Phillips, an inveterate Annapolis-area crabber, joined my call for a moratorium on the harvest of blue crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. "The time has come," he wrote in The Washington Post last month, "to stop pussyfooting around and shut down crabbing for a few years, to give the delectable crustaceans a chance to recover the way geese, yellow perch and rockfish did. " Phillips wrote about fishing and hunting for 30-plus years at The Post...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Civil rights groups are pressing lawmakers in Annapolis to impose a six-month moratorium on home foreclosures, as the number of cases has surged in Maryland. But a banker's group and the O'Malley administration contend that there's already plenty of help available for struggling homeowners, and that the housing market can't fully rebound until delinquent mortgages are dealt with. Maryland had the third-highest foreclosure rate in the country last month, according to RealtyTrac, a firm that monitors such activity.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
There is a statewide moratorium on the harvest of river herring, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The halt includes blueback and alewife herring, according to a DNR statement Friday. The moratorium has been in effect since Dec. 26. The Atlantic Coast river herring stock is managed by a multi-state commission. Each state from Maine to Florida was required to institute a fishing stop for herring by Jan. 1 unless a state-specific management plan demonstrated sustainability.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| December 10, 2013
My daughter was in a play this past weekend. She'd worked really hard on her lines, and my husband I were very excited to see the production but were trying to act somewhat cool so as to not make her extra nervous. The big night came. The costume was on. The congratulatory flowers were purchased. The house lights went down. The tension built. And then? It was iPads as far as the eye could see. Now let me tell you, it's hard to watch a show when so many people in front of you are holding up iPads, which display what they are filming, so it's like sitting in the dark and looking out at a sea of brighly flickering televisions that people are hoisting above their heads.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown said Thursday that Maryland should seek a waiver from the federal government so it won't have to administer outdated standardized tests to students this year. Speaking at a Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum, Brown also came out strongly for decriminalization of possession of small amounts of marijuana. But he said Maryland should wait and learn from the experience of other states before moving to full legalization of the drug. In response to a question, Brown said he's against giving the Maryland School Assessments, which are based on a curriculum that is being replaced.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 27, 1994
The Manchester Town Council meeting that was scheduled for tonight has been postponed because members are not ready to discuss a proposed moratorium on building permits.The discussion, the only item on tonight's agenda, has been moved to the Aug. 9 council meeting, said Town Manager Terry Short.Council members decided to await the completion of a study of Manchester's water system before taking up the moratorium proposal."We thought it would be better to have the information available before taking any action," Mr. Short said.
NEWS
January 9, 2003
IMAGINE A STATE law that said defendants could be punished more severely if they were black, or if victims of their crimes were white. Or one that said defendants whose crimes were committed in one county would be 26 times more likely to receive the maximum sentence than defendants in other jurisdictions. Besides being ridiculous, either would be a patent violation of the 14th Amendment's equal protection and due process stipulations, and an invitation to a whopper of a federal legal challenge.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group including a legislator, a civil rights organization and two attorneys called for a moratorium on Baltimore police Taser use after a 19-year-old's death at a city hospital. George V. King, a Charles County foster youth living in a Baltimore residential facility, was a patient at Good Samaritan Hospital on May 7 when he began fighting with hospital security staff. The hospital called city police officers for assistance and one officer used his Taser five times to subdue the man, according to the King family attorney and a law enforcement source.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
In response to Dan Rodricks ' article, "Stop tinkering: Ban crabbing for a year" (May 4) I must say that his solution to the Chesapeake Bay's crab shortage, placing a moratorium on crab harvesting, is too simple and elementary for this complex and multi-faceted problem. The Chesapeake Bay blue crab industry makes up $700 million of the state of Maryland's economy. There are many individuals and businesses involved in this economy, starting with watermen, marinas and boat repairs, bait and tackle supplies, truck drivers, fuel companies, crab wholesalers, crab picking houses, carry-out crab houses, sit down restaurants, refrigeration services, boiler services, and the list could continue.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' recommendation for a one-year moratorium on the crab harvest is correct ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). The members of the Maryland General have a history of not showing courage when faced with the facts. It took them several sessions to really put "teeth" into the laws on seat belts and with laws restricting cell phone use while driving. When it became apparent that the shad population was in danger, they finally took action, and in a couple of years the shad run was again in full swing.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2014
A couple of years ago, the governor of Maryland stood on a dock on South River, a bushel of steamed crabs at his feet, telling everyone it was OK to eat Chesapeake blue crabs again - sort of like the mayor in "Jaws" telling everyone it was OK to go back in the water. "I am glad to report that the population of the blue crab is now at a 19-year high," the governor said in April 2012. There was so much excitement about the comeback of the blue crab that the state launched a "True Blue" marketing campaign, identifying and promoting restaurants and markets selling Chesapeake lump.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | April 14, 2014
York Road is the main thoroughfare in downtown Towson and those commuters who travel it on a daily basis know the congestion around the intersection of York and Burke Avenue during rush hour. The crossroads have been deemed by the county as a failing intersection, meaning congestion is a critical issue because the crossroads cannot handle the amount of vehicles it sees at a given time. However, Baltimore County officials say the stretch of York Road just north of Burke Avenue is exempt from a development moratorium in place near failing intersections — according to its annual Basic Services Map, which designates infrastructure and traffic needs across the county.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
It is a time-honored tactic used by the powerless -- marshaling support to speak out against a proposal before a county council.But the protesters planning to make their case before the Baltimore County Council this week are not from some outraged community group battling the government. They are county homebuilders -- seen by many as the ultimate insiders, with an access to elected officials eased by years of generous campaign donations.The source of their ire is a school-related county building moratorium.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The Senate moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a prized naval air station in southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River.  Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, the region's economic engine.  They argued a delay was needed to finish a study of whether such projects could operate without interfering with the station's radar.
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