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Moral Values

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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | September 5, 2007
Idaho Republican Sen. Larry E. Craig's June arrest in a Minnesota airport men's room, and his guilty plea last month to a misdemeanor, are further evidence that Republicans operate on a preach-but-not-practice standard. This is the party that not only has exploited the gay marriage issue with ballot measures and even a proposal to amend the U.S. Constitution but also deigns to stand atop its self-erected pulpits and lecture liberals, Democrats and the rest of the country about the need to affirm and protect America's "moral values."
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NEWS
March 22, 2012
Where are the moral values of the mayor and governor to make them think it's OK to spend the taxpayers' money to buy food so they can entertain their families, friends and political cronies at football games, while everybody else is paying their own way? Joe Heming
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NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | May 11, 1993
Making foreign policy becomes very difficult for an American administration when moral values are in conflict with other national interests. This is the situation that President Clinton confronts as he makes decisions regarding Bosnia and China.Should the administration use force to save Bosnian Muslims from destruction in spite of the uncertainties that almost inevitably accompany the use of force? Can Mr. Clinton and Secretary of State Warren Christopher stand passively by while another people is destroyed in the heart of Europe?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 26, 2007
BOSTON -- In retrospect, it was probably not the best way to reassure the faithful. When James Dobson, child psychologist turned political kingmaker, rose to speak at the Values Voter Summit dinner, he first complained about media reports that the religious right was dead. Then he cheerily announced, "Welcome to the morgue." Yes, well, not yet. The much-reported news from last weekend's gathering was that the honchos of the religious right are still wanted by the Republican candidates.
NEWS
By Michael Zweig | November 19, 2004
DEMOCRATS ARE complaining bitterly that about 80 percent of Americans who cited "moral values" as their most important issue in exit polls voted for President Bush. How can anyone concerned about moral values, they wonder, endorse a leader who misled this country into war, arranged for billionaires to pay less in taxes and gave the United States and hopes for democracy a bad name around the globe? How can anyone concerned about moral values vote for a man whose first term saw such dramatic increases in poverty and inequality?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 8, 2004
BOSTON - I got familiar with the losing business rather early in life. When I was just a kid, my dad ran for Congress. What my child's eye remembers the most is what happened the next morning. My dad got up, put on his tie and went to the office. I learned something that day. This is what grown-ups do: They get back up and go to work. So in the wake of John Kerry's defeat, here's my prescription: Take an afternoon off for recriminations, a morning for whining, then race through the Kubler-Ross stages of grief and get back to work.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | November 9, 2004
CHICAGO - Across the political spectrum, experts agree that the election of 2004 represents a sharp swing toward old-fashioned Christian values, which conservatives cheer and liberals lament. "I have long advocated a stronger tie between politics and the virtues," announced veteran conservative moralist Bill Bennett the day after the election. "Last night it was evident that the American people agree." James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, said that because of the prayers of Christians, "God has given us a reprieve" - but a brief one that the president must use to implement a moral agenda.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Where are the moral values of the mayor and governor to make them think it's OK to spend the taxpayers' money to buy food so they can entertain their families, friends and political cronies at football games, while everybody else is paying their own way? Joe Heming
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | November 7, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH'S re-election was driven by voters' support for his policies on Iraq and terrorism. But for more than one-third of those who voted for him, "moral values" was the most significant issue. Moral values were not identified as a key issue in the campaign coverage of The Sun and other major metropolitan newspapers. And readers are letting us know that our failure to deeply explore such concerns is making us irrelevant to those who believe they are paramount. "What matters to me is not what you are writing about," said one Sun reader who said he had voted for President Bush.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
In one of the election's more surprising twists, voters told interviewers Tuesday the most important issue in the presidential race was not the Iraq war, the economy or terrorism, but moral values. According to an exit poll conducted for major media organizations, 22 percent of voters ranked moral values as the top issue. And of those people, almost four out of five voted for President Bush, suggesting that religious faith may have played a more important role in this race than most had predicted.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | September 5, 2007
Idaho Republican Sen. Larry E. Craig's June arrest in a Minnesota airport men's room, and his guilty plea last month to a misdemeanor, are further evidence that Republicans operate on a preach-but-not-practice standard. This is the party that not only has exploited the gay marriage issue with ballot measures and even a proposal to amend the U.S. Constitution but also deigns to stand atop its self-erected pulpits and lecture liberals, Democrats and the rest of the country about the need to affirm and protect America's "moral values."
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
In the most recent of his six books, Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr. wrote that "black pastors see politics as the means of making faith real by introducing faith principles into every fiber of life." Jackson, an evangelical preacher and lead pastor at Hope Christian Church in Lanham - a largely African-American congregation of 3,000 - has been crusading to do just that. A self-described "Biblical conservative and social reformer," Jackson, 52, a consecrated bishop in the Fellowship of International Churches, is author of The Black Contract With America On Moral Values, a six-point manifesto that lays out a biblically based social agenda he says would help blacks address their most urgent needs and uplift the public at large.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and Robert Little and John Woestendiek and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2005
It's going to be a bruiser. If you thought election 2004 and Terri Schiavo's last days were nasty confrontations in the so-called culture wars, just wait for the fight over who will fill Sandra Day O'Connor's U.S. Supreme Court seat. Ruptures over gay marriage, flag burning or displaying the Ten Commandments will feel like mere tremors compared with the cultural quake sure to erupt when the nation's differences become the weapons with which the Supreme Court's future is determined, political analysts say. Expect the "red" and the "blue" to go at it fiercely enough to leave the nation purple, or at least with some long-lingering bitter feelings.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
We admit it: We were wrong about a lot this year. Big Media, professional prognosticators, the loud guy at the water cooler: We dissected the Howard Dean phenomenon, only to hear it drowned out by one scream. Weren't mortgage rates supposed to zoom up? Don't even talk to us about exit polls. And, of course, some people are still looking for the weapons of mass destruction. While we were looking the other way, some news came at us like Curt Schilling's fastball. Who expected that the pitcher and his fellow Boston Red Sox would battle back from the edge of elimination by the usually indomitable Yankees to finally break the Bambino's Curse?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - One of the first things President Bush did upon re-election was claim a mandate for staying the course in Iraq, saying he intended to spend some of the political capital he earned Nov. 2. But a poll for ABC News and The Washington Post shows that 49 percent of 1,004 randomly selected Americans surveyed last week disapprove of the job he is doing as president, while 48 percent approve. That's not too surprising, considering the closeness of the election result. But, astonishingly, by much wider margins they also disapprove of the situation in Iraq (57-42)
NEWS
By Diane Camper | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S traveling road show on moral values came to Baltimore this week and brought down the house. During an appearance before 1,400 parents, teachers and students at W.E.B. DuBois High School, Mr. Cosby was greeted with several standing ovations as he talked about touchy subjects such as out-of-wedlock births, absentee fathers and a greater need for personal responsibility among African-Americans. This was hardly the firestorm he created several months ago at a 50th anniversary celebration of Brown vs. Board of Education, when he took lower-income black parents to task for, among other things, caring more about expensive sneakers than books for their kids.
NEWS
By Diane Camper | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S traveling road show on moral values came to Baltimore this week and brought down the house. During an appearance before 1,400 parents, teachers and students at W.E.B. DuBois High School, Mr. Cosby was greeted with several standing ovations as he talked about touchy subjects such as out-of-wedlock births, absentee fathers and a greater need for personal responsibility among African-Americans. This was hardly the firestorm he created several months ago at a 50th anniversary celebration of Brown vs. Board of Education, when he took lower-income black parents to task for, among other things, caring more about expensive sneakers than books for their kids.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 1, 1994
VATICAN CITY -- Fighting from a script written by Pope John Paul II, the Vatican fired a new broadside yesterday against a planned United Nations population conference, attacking the United States in general and Vice President Al Gore in particular.Members of a 17-member Vatican delegation leave today for Cairo, Egypt, carrying papal instructions to unflaggingly oppose a draft resolution for the Sept. 5-13 conference that endorses abortion on demand and takes a liberal view of human sexuality.
NEWS
By Michael Zweig | November 19, 2004
DEMOCRATS ARE complaining bitterly that about 80 percent of Americans who cited "moral values" as their most important issue in exit polls voted for President Bush. How can anyone concerned about moral values, they wonder, endorse a leader who misled this country into war, arranged for billionaires to pay less in taxes and gave the United States and hopes for democracy a bad name around the globe? How can anyone concerned about moral values vote for a man whose first term saw such dramatic increases in poverty and inequality?
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When ABC's affiliate stations are afraid to broadcast the film Saving Private Ryan for fear of being fined by the Federal Communications Commission, it makes me wonder about the new moral order that some people think is on the rise. I can't say for sure, but if Oscar-winning director Steven Spielberg's World War II epic tribute to America's troops is off-limits to the networks, ABC's Desperate Housewives had better watch their backs. Even though Saving Private Ryan aired uncut and without public uproar in 2001 and 2002, about 65 of ABC's more than 220 affiliate stations refused to air the movie this Veterans Day. What has changed?
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