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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Moonstruck is a great food movie. Nicholas Cage on bread, the making of eggs, the great meeting scene in the restaurant with Olympia Dukakis and John Mahoney. Moonstruck opens the 13th Annual Little Italy Film Festival tonight. By the way, I'm looking for a good photograph of those eggs. There are lots of recipes online. My favorite thing in the whole movie is Loretta Castorini's take on the Marc Chagall: " It's kind of little gaudy, don't you think?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Moonstruck is a great food movie. Nicholas Cage on bread, the making of eggs, the great meeting scene in the restaurant with Olympia Dukakis and John Mahoney. Moonstruck opens the 13th Annual Little Italy Film Festival tonight. By the way, I'm looking for a good photograph of those eggs. There are lots of recipes online. My favorite thing in the whole movie is Loretta Castorini's take on the Marc Chagall: " It's kind of little gaudy, don't you think?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 16, 1999
John Patrick Shanley's "Psychopathia Sexualis" opens the season at Fell's Point Corner Theatre tomorrow. The comedy, by the Academy Award-winning author of "Moonstruck," focuses on the impending marriage of an artist with a psychological problem -- without a certain pair of socks, he fears he won't be able to perform on his wedding night.Rodney Bonds directs the Fell's Point Corner production, which stars Chris Carver as the artist, Katie Carney as his fiancee and Tony Colavito as his psychiatrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival is the granddaddy — or should we say the Godfather? — to a Maryland phenomenon that has sprouted from Johns Hopkins to Fells Point and from the Shops at Kenilworth to the Lakefront of Columbia. Think of the phenomenon as the spirit of drive-in movies leaving cars behind and nestling at urban intersections and suburban lakefronts, at mall parking lots and at neighborhood parks. They offer casual fun: Instead of drive-ins, walk-ins — just remember, in most cases, to bring your own blanket or chairs.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
* Alexandra Dukakis, 92, mother of Academy Award-winning actress Olympia Dukakis, died Saturday in Montclair, N.J. She sang with the Arlington Philharmonic in Massachusetts for 20 years before moving to New Jersey in 1976, where she was active in the Whole Theater Company in Montclair. Her daughter, Olympia, won an Oscar in 1987 as best supporting actress in the film "Moonstruck."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | June 30, 2005
Little Italy Film Festival Where: the intersection of High and Stiles streets When: 9 p.m. tomorrow and consecutive Friday nights through Aug. 26 Why: Talk about a city staple -- a free one at that. This year's festival starts with an outdoor screening of Moonstruck (think Cher). You might want to take a lawn chair because the ones provided go on a first-come, first-serve basis. Information: www.little italymd.com Price: Free
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 7, 1996
When John Patrick Shanley, author of such screenplays as "Moonstruck" and "Joe Versus the Volcano," writes a satire about the venality of Hollywood, you have to figure he knows whereof he writes. Shanley's "Four Dogs and a Bone" -- whose quartet of characters includes a producer, a starlet, an over-the-hill ingenue and, of course, a screenwriter -- will receive its Baltimore premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre beginning tomorrow.Steve Goldklang directs a cast consisting of Darlene Deardorff, Tim King, Larry Malkus and Stacey L. Werling.
NEWS
October 2, 1992
* Feodor Chaliapin Jr., an American actor best known for his role as the dog-walking grandfather in the 1987 movie "Moonstruck," died Sept. 17 after a brief illness at his home in Rome, where he had lived since the 1940s. Mr. Chaliapin, 87, started his acting career in silent movies, where his accented English wouldn't be a problem. He went on to establish himself as a character actor and played many minor roles in Italian films. But Mr. Chaliapin's career only really took off in 1986 when, already in his '80s, he was chosen to play the role of the blind, murderous monk Jorge of Burgos in the thriller "The Name of The Rose," which also starred Sean Connery and F. Murray Abraham.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
EARL SLACUM is singing the blues - and that makes him happy. Slacum, principal of Swansfield Elementary School, will be one of the featured singers at Swansfield Swings the Blues, a coffeehouse-style concert scheduled at Wilde Lake High School on Nov. 20. "Singing is a passion of mine," Slacum said. "I grew up singing all my life." The grandson of a Methodist minister, Slacum started singing as a youngster in church. Later, as a student at Morgan State University, he joined a rhythm and blues singing group called the Qualitones.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2005
Caitlin Smith is starting to make a name for herself in the world of art. The 13-year-old Laurel girl, who will start eighth grade at Hammond Middle School next month, recently placed fourth in an international drawing competition that attracted tens of thousands of contestants from all over the world. Now she is providing illustrations for a children's book. Caitlin's work was honored in the 14th annual International Children's Painting Competition on the Environment, organized by the United Nations Environment Programme, Bayer AG and the Foundation for Global Peace and Environment.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 21, 2007
All David Sington set out to do was interview the nine men, still living, who walked on the moon. That in itself - bringing together members of perhaps mankind's most exclusive club, men who have visited another world - would be reason enough to make a film. As Sington notes, the astronauts are not big into reunions and rarely gather together to share their experiences. But it didn't take long for the award-winning British filmmaker to realize that In The Shadow of the Moon was more than simply a bunch of old men reminiscing.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2005
Caitlin Smith is starting to make a name for herself in the world of art. The 13-year-old Laurel girl, who will start eighth grade at Hammond Middle School next month, recently placed fourth in an international drawing competition that attracted tens of thousands of contestants from all over the world. Now she is providing illustrations for a children's book. Caitlin's work was honored in the 14th annual International Children's Painting Competition on the Environment, organized by the United Nations Environment Programme, Bayer AG and the Foundation for Global Peace and Environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | June 30, 2005
Little Italy Film Festival Where: the intersection of High and Stiles streets When: 9 p.m. tomorrow and consecutive Friday nights through Aug. 26 Why: Talk about a city staple -- a free one at that. This year's festival starts with an outdoor screening of Moonstruck (think Cher). You might want to take a lawn chair because the ones provided go on a first-come, first-serve basis. Information: www.little italymd.com Price: Free
ENTERTAINMENT
By Leanne Potts and Leanne Potts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
On a triumphant farewell tour, ageless diva Cher gets the last laugh on critics. Ah, Cher. For 40 years she's been rolling through the pop-culture landscape like a glittery Mardi Gras float. Through the decades she's sashayed, from her days with Sonny to the winner's circle at the Oscars to her current farewell tour, which makes a stop tonight at 1st Mariner Arena and which will have played more than 125 U.S. cities by the time it ends in April. Critics along Cher's parade route snort.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
EARL SLACUM is singing the blues - and that makes him happy. Slacum, principal of Swansfield Elementary School, will be one of the featured singers at Swansfield Swings the Blues, a coffeehouse-style concert scheduled at Wilde Lake High School on Nov. 20. "Singing is a passion of mine," Slacum said. "I grew up singing all my life." The grandson of a Methodist minister, Slacum started singing as a youngster in church. Later, as a student at Morgan State University, he joined a rhythm and blues singing group called the Qualitones.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
The Fifth District Volunteer Fire Department in Clarksville will hold an open house from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 20. Videos, fire engine rides, tours of the station, a "safety house" for children and refreshments are planned. Admission is free. Information: 410-313-7215. Glenwood church planning a yard sale Saturday St. Andrew's Episcopal Church will hold a yard sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, rain or shine. A 50 percent discount on all items will be offered from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., and bags can be filled for $5 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The church is at Route 97 and Union Chapel Road, in Glenwood.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
The Fifth District Volunteer Fire Department in Clarksville will hold an open house from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 20. Videos, fire engine rides, tours of the station, a "safety house" for children and refreshments are planned. Admission is free. Information: 410-313-7215. Glenwood church planning a yard sale Saturday St. Andrew's Episcopal Church will hold a yard sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, rain or shine. A 50 percent discount on all items will be offered from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., and bags can be filled for $5 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The church is at Route 97 and Union Chapel Road, in Glenwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Leanne Potts and Leanne Potts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
On a triumphant farewell tour, ageless diva Cher gets the last laugh on critics. Ah, Cher. For 40 years she's been rolling through the pop-culture landscape like a glittery Mardi Gras float. Through the decades she's sashayed, from her days with Sonny to the winner's circle at the Oscars to her current farewell tour, which makes a stop tonight at 1st Mariner Arena and which will have played more than 125 U.S. cities by the time it ends in April. Critics along Cher's parade route snort.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 2000
The Open-Air Film Festival in Little Italy has been another big success this year, according to an organizer of the summer-long event. "We've gotten off to a very good start," said Tom Kiefaber, owner of the Senator Theatre. The festival kicked off with a program of short films by Martin Scorsese, and "raised a few eyebrows," Kiefaber said, "but generally we're getting a good response." The Senator sponsors the festival with the Little Italy Restaurant Association (LIRA). Tonight's offering, "Moonstruck," was a huge favorite last year, so Kiefaber advises filmgoers to get there early.
NEWS
By Gennifer Choldenko | June 21, 2000
Editor's note: A determined bovine makes her dreams of reaching for the stars come true. Mother Goose ... what a bag of feathers she is. She makes it sound so easy. Nine hundred forty-one pounds of cow meat, not counting the udder, catapults 240,000 miles to jump over the moon -- and what does that old goose woman write? One lousy line -- not even a whole poem. First of all, you may not know this, but we horses jump over the moon on a regular basis. We begin training from a very early age. Which is just what we were doing when this cow started hanging around.
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