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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | June 10, 1991
Agents of the State Comptroller's Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Enforcement Unit and Prince George's County police last week put a cork in a moonshine operation at an unoccupied house in a secluded part of Accokeek.The agents destroyed 300 gallons of corn mash and confiscated a 60-gallon copper still and 3 gallons of moonshine.A citizen tipped police.The Prince George's state's at torney will decide if charges should be filed, said Marvin A. Bond, assistant state comptroller. The maximum penalty for making untaxed liquor is five years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine.
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FEATURES
For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
At Myth and Moonshine, the 'shine isn't confined to Mason jars and shot glasses: It also makes it onto the food menu, which puts a sophisticated spin on country cooking. In this great cold-weather dish, butternut squash and pumpkin add sweetness and spice to hearty chili and a scoop of sour cream infused with sweet apple pie moonshine reduction adds a jolt of countrified fun. Pumpkin Chili with Moonshine Sour Cream Serves 8-10 For the chili: 1 medium butternut squash Olive oil 2 1/2 pounds ground beef 1 large onion, medium dice 1 medium carrot, medium dice 1 ¼ cups diced tomato 1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, minced 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 packed Tablespoon fresh sage, diced 1 Tablespoon dry oregano 1 1/2 Tablespoons white pepper 2 Tablespoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon fresh nutmeg, grated (optional)
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SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | March 7, 2004
Put on the 3-D glasses at the Maryland Science Center at the Inner Harbor and two things happen: You find NASCAR's Nextel Cup racing virtually in your lap and you get to go for some daring, breathless rides. The film, NASCAR: The IMAX Experience, which opens Friday, is a documentary and reality show in one. It begins with a 1940's car chase that is supposed to suggest the good old days, when racing legend Junior Johnson - among others - would outrun the law on North Carolina's back roads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 19, 2013
Based on its name, you might think MoonShine Tavern is strictly a place that's good for shots and not much else. And while it does deliver on the shots - its moonshine menu is a mile long - with a talented kitchen staff offering sophisticated twists on casual Southern food, Boston Street's newest addition deserves a closer look. During our Thursday-night visit to the Canton spot formerly occupied by The Gin Mill, MoonShine's rustic space - polished a bit, but mostly unchanged since the Gin Mill days - was moderately busy, but with more drinkers than diners.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2002
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Some bibulous rustics call it white lightning, others call it 'shine, while the more soul-struck prefer a snort of holy water. Whatever your designated poison, it is the crystal-clear corn liquor of Appalachia, the illegal essence of three centuries of mountain hollow stills. Payton D. Fireman, a local lawyer with a taste for marketing, has begun bottling and selling the volatile potion legally for the first time in state memory under the label Mountain Moonshine. "Of course it's rough: It's moonshine," said Fireman to a visitor brought bolt upright and teary-eyed by a shot of the clear white whiskey.
NEWS
By Don Russell and Don Russell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 9, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Judging from the size of an illegal still discovered in a derelict North Philadelphia garage, Philadelphia has a powerful taste for moonshine. The kind of stuff that provides full-body anesthesia before removing the hair from your chest. One sip is enough for a good jolt. A cup will put you down for the night. Investigators said, the booze factory exploded in a roar recently when one of its boiling kettles overheated. The gaping hole on the third floor of the building, on North Uber Street near Montgomery Avenue, exposed a full-scale distillery with at least six 500- gallon tanks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 1998
ROCKY MOUNT, Va. - At the first sound of baying watchdogs, Jay Calhoun, a special agent of the Virginia Alcohol Beverage Control Commission Liquor Task Force, crouched in a thicket of mountain laurel and waited. In camouflage, Calhoun and two other agents remained motionless, their eyes focused on a corrugated-steel building less than 50 yards away through the trees, where they believed moonshine was being manufactured.As soon as the dogs lost interest, Calhoun said, "Let's go, the gig's up."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
ORAVILLE -- It took more than 60 years, but the revenuers finally caught up with John M. Morgan Sr.The first time they chased him through the woods of St. Mary's County, he was a boy during Prohibition making a few dollars tending a bootlegger's still. He was nimble afoot in those days, and they never got him.But when he returned home to Oraville from breakfast on the morning of Dec. 29, Mr. Morgan, now 77, had nowhere to run. State and county officers surrounded his car and placed him under arrest.
NEWS
By Peter T. Kilborn and Peter T. Kilborn,New York Times News Service | April 9, 2000
ROCKY MOUNT, Va. -- Grinning seditiously, a prominent citizen of this Blue Ridge foothills town takes from his kitchen refrigerator an illegal gift from a moonshiner friend: a syrupy red liquor in a quart jar packed with grapelike damsonberries. He offers a taste to his visitor. It is a brandy, sweet and silky. "Damson's the best," he says. Next he selects a half-gallon jar of heart-stopping white lightning, as clear as vodka. Shaking it, he points to the "bead," or head. Bubbles that form a thick, beery bead indicate toxic contamination from sleazy stills that use old car radiators to condense the vapors from cooking and fermentation.
NEWS
By Evaline Ness | January 10, 1999
On a small island, near a large harbor, there once lived a fisherman's little daughter (named Samantha, but always called Sam), who had the reckless habit of lying.Not even the sailors home from the sea could tell stranger stories than Sam. Not even the ships in the harbor, with curious cargoes from giraffes to gerbils, claimed more wonders than Sam did.Sam said her mother was a mermaid, when everyone knew she was dead.Sam said she had a fierce lion at home, and a baby kangaroo. (Actually, what she really had was an old wise cat called Bangs.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
In its aim and ambition, Moonshine Tavern is nothing like the Gin Mill, the cozy Canton bar and restaurant it replaced after nearly 16 years of service. Like many of the nearby bars on Boston Street, the Gin Mill was more of a casual place for dinner and drinks than a hot spot. I talked to Moonshine Tavern co-owner Shanna Cooper in January, and it was clear that she and partner Jacob Millisock hoped to make Gin Mill a distant memory. "We're not looking to be a hole-in-the-wall bar," Cooper said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | February 26, 2013
Moonshine. It's whiskey in its raw form, unaged, pure white lightning in a jar. The mystique surrounding the rogue spirit is undeniable and with a resurgence of interest and a commercial presence of legal "moonshine" on the market, Moonshine Tavern in Canton has come to capitalize on the theme. With 22 varieties of legal tender moonshine available for consumption and a cocktail list full of the stuff, one entry in particular stands out as an item of interest: the White Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
UPDATE (Jan. 22): On Monday, co-owner Shanna Cooper stated in an email that Moonshine Tavern's grand opening is now Saturday, Feb. 9, instead of this Saturday. She did not give a reason for the postponement. --------------- Posted Jan. 10: Last Sunday, the Gin Mill on Boston Street closed after nearly 16 years of service. The Canton building won't be closed for long, though, as Moonshine Tavern is set to open on Jan. 26, according to co-owner Shanna Cooper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | September 26, 2011
Subtlety isn't a strength of the new FOX show “Terra Nova.” With all the mystery and none of the finesse of “Lost,” and all the dinosaurs and none of the excitement of “Jurassic Park,” the show has all the makings of a glorious, wonderful disaster. The premise is simple - and ominous - enough. In the year 2149, the planet Earth has become a nearly uninhabitable dystopia of rancid air and Orwellian undertones, so the government has begun sending people back in time - 85 million years back in time, to be precise, to start a new life in fortressed cabanas in the midst of a dinosaur-inhabited jungle.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 8, 2005
State officials have arrested a Howard County teenager who they say was brewing illegal moonshine in a wooded area near his home in a homemade still built from a propane-heated metal trash can filled with corn mash. The 16-year-old had made about two teaspoons of whiskey before he was caught during a Tuesday night stakeout in the Rocky Gorge Reservoir near Fulton, said a spokesman for state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer. The copper tubes were untarnished, so it appeared to have been the still's first use, authorities said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2005
One's fondness for the big-screen Dukes of Hazzard will depend on how many times one can be gladdened by hearing the exclamation "Yeeeeeee-haaaaaa." That's certainly the dominant line of dialogue in this movie, a multimillion-dollar version of a bargain-basement, down-home comedy that ran on CBS from 1979 to 1985. As the rhymingly named Luke Duke, Johnny Knoxville gets to scream it 47 times, while Willie Nelson as moonshining Uncle Jesse Duke bellows it 19 times and Jessica Simpson as the buxom, short-shorted Daisy Duke squeals it 11 times.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2005
One's fondness for the big-screen Dukes of Hazzard will depend on how many times one can be gladdened by hearing the exclamation "Yeeeeeee-haaaaaa." That's certainly the dominant line of dialogue in this movie, a multimillion-dollar version of a bargain-basement, down-home comedy that ran on CBS from 1979 to 1985. As the rhymingly named Luke Duke, Johnny Knoxville gets to scream it 47 times, while Willie Nelson as moonshining Uncle Jesse Duke bellows it 19 times and Jessica Simpson as the buxom, short-shorted Daisy Duke squeals it 11 times.
NEWS
January 10, 1999
One way to help your child become a better reader is to connect reading to writing. Stories are often good prompts from which to launch a writing activity. After reading "Sam, Bangs and Moonshine," discuss the story and the meaning of some of the powerful terms used in this tale. What does moonshine stand for? What term did Bangs use to define moonshine? Select some of the terms used to describe the weather that day. Talk about and draw pictures of thick muddy clouds and torrents of rain.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2005
The owner is in his early 90s, in faltering health and is receiving the chance of a lifetime in a race he won't be able to attend. The trainer is 72 and a Maryland legend whose career has been resuscitated after a lengthy slump. The jockey quit riding for nearly four years, ballooned to 150 pounds, required eight months to shed the necessary weight to resume his career and now is back among the best in the state's colony. The horse, who won the Federico Tesio Stakes in April, is an offspring of one of the most productive recent sires, Malibu Moon, and is an honest type who always seems to provide a maximum effort.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Malibu Moonshine may have run his way into the Preakness yesterday. Aided by a slow pace and a compact field, the chestnut colt proved he could handle 1 1/8 miles, overtaking front-runner Hello Jerry in deep stretch to capture the $150,000 Federico Tesio Stakes, the feature on the Spring Festival of Racing at Pimlico Race Course, by three-quarters of a length. The performance could be a steppingstone into the middle jewel of the Triple Crown, although trainer King Leatherbury is not committing just yet. "We'll evaluate this effort and then decide later," said Leatherbury, 72 years old and third on the all-time list with 6,070 wins.
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