Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMoonlight
IN THE NEWS

Moonlight

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
"Let's take a moonlight," proclaimed The Sun in 1946, of those mini-voyages that were once respites for Baltimoreans escaping the searing summer heat of the city.They were also popular backdrops for waterborne romances as young people curled up on deck chairs with old or newfound friends of the opposite sex while others danced away the night in the boat's ballroom.Jacques Kelly, elsewhere on this page, discusses the joys still to be found in such a cruise today.In the early evening, passengers hustled down to Pratt and Light streets, the foot of Broadway or Fells Point, by streetcar or auto, and boarded the Emma Giles, Dreamland, Tred Avon, Louise, Kitty Knight or Bay Belle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Two terrific shows premiered last weekend in Annapolis, set in nearly the same period and dealing with history-making creative artists. At Colonial Players, "Moonlight and Magnolias" is set in 1939 and tells the behind-the-scenes story of making the film version of "Gone with the Wind. " Appropriately, it evokes gales of audience laughter. Infinity Theatre presents "Sisters of Swing," a musical biography of the World War II-era harmonizing Andrews Sisters that inspired the opening-night audience to applaud every familiar song.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | April 10, 1991
When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'dAnd the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.Washington.--April is a time of memories in America, the month of Lexington and Concord, the month when Jefferson, Monroe, Audubon and Grant were born, when we entered World War I, when Franklin Roosevelt died.The most heartbreaking moment in our history came at this time of spring, 126 years ago this Sunday, when John Wilkes Booth shot Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater on Tenth Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 22, 2011
City liquor board Chairman Steve Fogleman has a new sideline, as a tennis reporter. Fogleman, who avidly tweets about liquor board business under the handle BaltoBeerBaron , started a new Twitter feed this month under the name Tennis Maryland . Fogleman played tennis as a kid, though never competitively, and has followed professional tennis closely as an adult. On BaltoBeerBaron, he's been mixing tweets about liquor-license transfers with the likes of news on the Williams sisters.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
December isn't the busiest month of the year at Oriole Park. Parking spaces are no problem. There's always an empty box seat. It's even possible to be first in line at Boog's Barbecue.But the crowds return tonight, if only briefly. The occasion is the Orioles' second annual "Moonlight Madness," a worthy event for baseball fans interested in clubhouse tours, autograph sessions and -- not to be forgotten -- securing a place in line when the team begins selling tickets for 1994 home games.Showing up at the ballpark today -- ticket windows will be open 4 p.m. until midnight -- doesn't guarantee that fans will pick up prime seats to the games of their choice.
FEATURES
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | October 17, 1997
Franz Kafka, that great journalist of alienation, did not write Tom DiCillo's "Box of Moonlight," but DiCillo cites Kafka as an inspiration. "Box of Moonlight" captures that Kafkaesque spirit better than any movie since "Barton Fink" (1992), the Coen brothers' epic encounter with writer's block. "Moonlight" is a thrill-ride designed for the intellect.Coincidentally, the star of "Barton Fink," John Turturro, plays the lead in "Box of Moonlight," too. He's more of an ordinary guy here -- an arrogant businessman, instead of "Fink's" playwright -- but mundane weirdness stalks him at every turn.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers have embarked on their final week of rehearsal in preparation for next weekend's opening of Ken Ludwig's Lend Me a Tenor at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Ludwig's farce, filled with mistaken identities and assorted tenor groupies, opened on Broadway in March 1989. It ran there for more than a year, winning many awards including two Tonys, then ran in London, where it was nominated for the Olivier Award as comedy of the year. The show has been seen in 200-plus productions in more than 25 countries.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 19, 1993
A review of the Anne Arundel Community College Moonlight '' Troupers' production of "Cabaret" that ran in last Friday's editions of The Sun for Anne Arundel identified the pit orchestra conductor incorrectly. The conductor was Steve Gilmer.The Sun regrets the errors.The Anne Arundel Community College Moonlight Troupers' production of "Cabaret" is one of the more professionally mounted area musicals of recent memory, despite a few flaws.The production looks tremendous. The sets are prodigious, especially the infamous Kit Kat Club, that sleazy nightspot that symbolizes the moral collapse of Germany on the eve of the Nazi takeover.
FEATURES
By Julie Brinckloe | August 4, 1999
Editor's note: A young boy discovers the beauty and excitement of fireflies but realizes he can't keep them in captivity.On a summer evening I looked up from dinner, through the open window to the backyard.It was growing dark. My treehouse was a black shape in the tree and I wouldn't go up there now.But something flickered there, a moment -- I looked, and it was gone. It flickered again, over near the fence. Fireflies! "Don't let your dinner get cold," said Momma.I forked the meat and corn and potatoes into my mouth.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
They came by bus, by light rail, by automobile and on foot They came by the thousands to Moonlight Madness last night at Camden Yards.The first few customers began waiting before dawn, wanting to be first in line for the 1.5 million precious Orioles tickets that went on sale. The club offered hot chocolate and coffee to those who persevered the longest.By 6 p.m., when the ticket windows opened, lines stretched all the way into the parking lot. The event was clearly a hit. By 7 p.m., the lines were considerably shorter.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | July 8, 2011
I love watching rehearsals, whether they be for dance concerts, dinner theater shows, neighborhood musicals or —during these early summer days — marching drum and bugle corps performances. Recent weeks have brought me the opportunity to sample and savor all of the above. No matter what the discipline, there is nothing phony about a rehearsal. The effort is real and raw, the flubs are painful and the moment of mastery is exhilarating. Rehearsals give you an inside view of art, something you never experience in a polished presentation.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Baltimore-born Donna A. Lewis is a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security who moonlights as a stripper. A comic stripper. Her semi-autobiographical strip, "Reply All," about a successful career woman struggling with self-doubt, has just been syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group. It debuts Monday in about a dozen newspapers nationwide, including The Post, Boston Globe and Charlotte Observer. While the strip is based loosely on Lewis' life, you won't see any "Dilbert"-style references to her day job. And not just because, as her bio on http://www.replyallcomic.com deadpans, "Donna is not funny or interesting at all by day. " Homeland Security has given her the OK to write the comic strip in her spare time, with the caveat that she must steer clear of anything related to her work for the department's Office of General Counsel.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
The Baltimore Police Department has ordered a review of all secondary employment arrangements after receiving an inquiry from The Baltimore Sun about officers who were hired by a Southwest Baltimore business that had experienced a rash of break-ins. A police spokesman said Deputy Commissioner for Operations Anthony Barksdale ordered an audit Tuesday after police were unable to find paperwork authorizing officers to moonlight at Mary Sue Candies, a 60-year-old company known for its candy Easter eggs that has recently been hit by thieves taking copper pipes.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
If skies clear up, stargazers should watch this week for the annual Orionid meteor shower. Active from early October through early November, the shower peaks this week at 23 per hour in dark locations. The moon is new, so no moonlight will interfere. Look after midnight. Meteors - very fast, with half leaving persistent trails - will emerge from the constellation Orion, rising in the east after 11 p.m.
NEWS
November 12, 2008
Moonlighting is a time-honored tradition for Baltimore police. It's a way to earn extra money. But the police commissioner wants to restrict the practice because of concerns he has about public safety. That may sound at odds, but Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III says businesses that hire off-duty officers to provide security at bars and nightclubs are farming out a responsibility that should be theirs alone. He has a valid point - some police working in the city's entertainment district have become entangled in situations that pose a potential liability for officers and the department.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | August 21, 2008
This season, Anne Arundel Community College will continue its tradition of offering performing arts events that range from Broadway musical favorites to dramas to operas sung in English, from orchestral and jazz concerts to classical, jazz and tap dance. The shows should give students a chance to hone their skills before an audience, while offering a variety of entertainment options at affordable prices at the AACC Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. , in addition to works by Massenet and Brazilian composer Cesar Carnargo Mariano.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers present their spring production - Tom Stoppard's adult farce "On the Razzle" - in a two-weekend run beginning tomorrow at Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Set in 19th-century Vienna, the comedy centers on men looking for adventure and women seeking romance. Based on Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy's 19th-century farce "Einen Jux will er sich machen" - the source of Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker," which later became "Hello, Dolly!"
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | April 6, 2007
During her more than 25-year association with Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers, performing arts department Chairwoman Barbara Marder has not witnessed a single Shakespeare production at the college, recalling that A Midsummer Night's Dream was offered about 30 years ago. From what I observed at last Thursday's rehearsal of Twelfth Night, it is about time the Bard got on the boards. The play looks to receive fine treatment from the drama club cast when it opens April 13 for a brief run at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.