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NEWS
August 25, 2014
As a person who lives with recurring clinical depression and also is the facilitator of a local Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance support group for people with mood disorders and their loved ones, I thank Mark Hanna for his eloquent description of depression and plea for public understanding of this disease and compassion for people living with it ( "Robin Williams' death holds lessons for the living," Aug. 18). Additionally, I thank Pastor Hanna for generously providing space for, and encouragement to, our support group.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
As a person who lives with recurring clinical depression and also is the facilitator of a local Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance support group for people with mood disorders and their loved ones, I thank Mark Hanna for his eloquent description of depression and plea for public understanding of this disease and compassion for people living with it ( "Robin Williams' death holds lessons for the living," Aug. 18). Additionally, I thank Pastor Hanna for generously providing space for, and encouragement to, our support group.
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NEWS
May 25, 1993
Quite apart from its long-term effects on the political scene in the District of Columbia, the suicide death last week of City Council President John Wilson has refocused attention on the debilitating and often deadly disorder known as clinical depression. Mr. Wilson's family suggested he had taken his own life as a result of a severe depression that began several months ago, the last of a series of such episodes that had plagued his life.Depression affects some 20 million Americans, according to medical experts, and accounts for as much as 80 percent of the suicides in this country.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The anxiety began hours after Laurie Bardon Syphard gave birth to her daughter and grew as the weeks ticked by. Was the baby sleeping enough? Was she malnourished? Dehydrated? Syphard became obsessed with the cleanliness of her daughter's baby bottles, cycling through them in a rigid rotation. She worried that a catastrophe would occur each time they left the house. "I would pack and repack the diaper bag eight times and then never leave," she said. The anxiety was so overwhelming that Syphard sometimes struggled to get out of bed. Syphard, 34, knew that her symptoms were more than the typical jitters of a new parent.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | November 4, 1994
Tomorrow's seminar in Mount Airy about mood disorders will bring a positive message to area residents about clinical depression and manic-depressive illness."
HEALTH
By Dr.J.Raymond DePaulo Jr. and Dr.J.Raymond DePaulo Jr.,Dr. DePaulo is director of the Affective Disorders Clinic at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and author, with Dr. Keith Ablow, M.D., of "How To Cope With Depression." | September 25, 1990
William Styron's memoir, "Darkness Visible," is an expanded and revised version of a lecture he gave here in April 1989 at an Annual Symposium on Mood Disorders sponsored by the Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA) and the Department of Psychiatry of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.Like the other 400 members of that audience, I was moved by Mr. Styron's description of his gradual descent into the despair of clinical depression and by his wit in protesting the name "depression" and in recounting his "surrender" to occupational therapy in the hospital.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
LOUD OR SOFT, a laugh tickles the brain's reward center, Stanford University scientists say, and that's all to the good. Using magnetic imaging scanners on college students, the researchers found that humor can turn on brain networks that send reward messages to the system, the same areas that amphetamines and cocaine are known to trigger. Yet humor doesn't carry the drugs' ill effects, and may offer other benefits, too. While earlier researchers have noted that a good sense of humor appears to have health benefits, including increasing immune-cell counts and decreasing pain and anxiety, they hadn't yet made the sight gag-brain connection.
NEWS
By JANE GROSS and JANE GROSS,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2006
BURLINGHAM, N.Y. -- The breakfast buffet at Camp Echo starts at a picnic table covered in gingham-patterned oil cloth. Here, children jostle for their morning medications: Zoloft for depression, Abilify for bipolar disorder, Guanfacine for twitchy eyes and a host of medications for attention deficit disorder. A quick gulp of water, a greeting from the nurse, and the youngsters move on to the next table for orange juice, Special K and chocolate chip pancakes. The dispensing of pills and pancakes is over in minutes, all part of a typical day at a typical sleep-away camp in the Catskills.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
Nearly half of college-age adults struggle with a mental health disorder, from alcohol dependency to depression and anxiety. But only a quarter seek treatment, according to a study published today. "This study gives a picture of the magnitude of the problem and the extent to which these disorders go untreated," said Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and lead author of the study. "It really lays out the challenge of providing services to meet the need, particularly of alcohol use disorders."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Drew Carey, riding high these days with a successful television sitcom, doesn't like to talk much about the times he was so angry he punched a car dashboard in half and so depressed he tried to kill himself twice."
NEWS
By Dinah Miller and Annette Hanson | March 7, 2012
Despite the fact that marijuana remains a controlled substance that is illegal in the United States under federal law, 16 states and the District of Columbia have legalized "medical marijuana. " Del. Cheryl Glenn's HB15, the "Maryland Medical Marijuana Act," was introduced and first read on Jan. 11, the first day of this year's General Assembly session. Two more bills calling for legalization of medical marijuana have been introduced since. We would like to make the case that medical marijuana, as currently "prescribed," makes a farce of medicine.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
Nearly half of college-age adults struggle with a mental health disorder, from alcohol dependency to depression and anxiety. But only a quarter seek treatment, according to a study published today. "This study gives a picture of the magnitude of the problem and the extent to which these disorders go untreated," said Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and lead author of the study. "It really lays out the challenge of providing services to meet the need, particularly of alcohol use disorders."
NEWS
By JANE GROSS and JANE GROSS,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2006
BURLINGHAM, N.Y. -- The breakfast buffet at Camp Echo starts at a picnic table covered in gingham-patterned oil cloth. Here, children jostle for their morning medications: Zoloft for depression, Abilify for bipolar disorder, Guanfacine for twitchy eyes and a host of medications for attention deficit disorder. A quick gulp of water, a greeting from the nurse, and the youngsters move on to the next table for orange juice, Special K and chocolate chip pancakes. The dispensing of pills and pancakes is over in minutes, all part of a typical day at a typical sleep-away camp in the Catskills.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
LOUD OR SOFT, a laugh tickles the brain's reward center, Stanford University scientists say, and that's all to the good. Using magnetic imaging scanners on college students, the researchers found that humor can turn on brain networks that send reward messages to the system, the same areas that amphetamines and cocaine are known to trigger. Yet humor doesn't carry the drugs' ill effects, and may offer other benefits, too. While earlier researchers have noted that a good sense of humor appears to have health benefits, including increasing immune-cell counts and decreasing pain and anxiety, they hadn't yet made the sight gag-brain connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Since she published a new book on suicide, Johns Hopkins medical school psychiatrist Kay Redfield Jamison has been struck by how photographers always seem to render her as dour. The professor who brought mental illness out of the closet is anything but: animated and friendly, a thin, tousled blond, she wears a large smile often painted coral.This despite tough times lately: In recent weeks, Jamison, 53, has spent more time at Hopkins quizzing oncologists treating her husband than teaching residents in psychiatry.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Drew Carey, riding high these days with a successful television sitcom, doesn't like to talk much about the times he was so angry he punched a car dashboard in half and so depressed he tried to kill himself twice."
NEWS
By Dinah Miller and Annette Hanson | March 7, 2012
Despite the fact that marijuana remains a controlled substance that is illegal in the United States under federal law, 16 states and the District of Columbia have legalized "medical marijuana. " Del. Cheryl Glenn's HB15, the "Maryland Medical Marijuana Act," was introduced and first read on Jan. 11, the first day of this year's General Assembly session. Two more bills calling for legalization of medical marijuana have been introduced since. We would like to make the case that medical marijuana, as currently "prescribed," makes a farce of medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Since she published a new book on suicide, Johns Hopkins medical school psychiatrist Kay Redfield Jamison has been struck by how photographers always seem to render her as dour. The professor who brought mental illness out of the closet is anything but: animated and friendly, a thin, tousled blond, she wears a large smile often painted coral.This despite tough times lately: In recent weeks, Jamison, 53, has spent more time at Hopkins quizzing oncologists treating her husband than teaching residents in psychiatry.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | November 4, 1994
Tomorrow's seminar in Mount Airy about mood disorders will bring a positive message to area residents about clinical depression and manic-depressive illness."
NEWS
May 25, 1993
Quite apart from its long-term effects on the political scene in the District of Columbia, the suicide death last week of City Council President John Wilson has refocused attention on the debilitating and often deadly disorder known as clinical depression. Mr. Wilson's family suggested he had taken his own life as a result of a severe depression that began several months ago, the last of a series of such episodes that had plagued his life.Depression affects some 20 million Americans, according to medical experts, and accounts for as much as 80 percent of the suicides in this country.
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