Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMonument Valley
IN THE NEWS

Monument Valley

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
July 27, 2008
This photo was taken last fall on a visit to Monument Valley, Utah. On a cross-country drive, I stopped at the Navajo Tribal Park, which has more than 91,000 acres spanning from Arizona to Utah. I grew up watching Westerns and seeing the beauty of the park through movie director John Ford's eyes. The mesas, canyons and rock formations are incredible sights. My suggestion to the road traveler is to camp on the butte when you enter the park. It is one of the best wake-up calls you will ever witness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
September 27, 2009
I live in Bel Air and when I was a child, my parents took our family on a 6,000-mile, coast-to-coast camping trip. I have many memories of the journey, but what stayed with me the longest was the boundless magnificence of the Western sky. I longed to see the West again and share its beauty with my own children, so in late July we spent eight days touring Arizona, Utah, and Nevada. Our primary destinations were the Grand Canyon, Zion National Park, and Monument Valley, on the Arizona-Utah border.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By Brian Downes and By Brian Downes,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2000
In "Cinema Southwest," a comprehensive guide to Western movies and their locations, author John A. Murray writes: "We can imagine a Southwest without Bryce Canyon, or even without Zion, just as we can imagine a person without an arm or a leg, but a Southwest without Monument Valley is inconceivable." As mysterious as it is majestic, the harsh and desolate terrain that straddles the Arizona-Utah border some 20 miles north of Kayenta, Ariz., is -- thanks hugely to the classic Westerns of filmmaker John Ford -- the most recognizable landscape in the entire West.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2008
This photo was taken last fall on a visit to Monument Valley, Utah. On a cross-country drive, I stopped at the Navajo Tribal Park, which has more than 91,000 acres spanning from Arizona to Utah. I grew up watching Westerns and seeing the beauty of the park through movie director John Ford's eyes. The mesas, canyons and rock formations are incredible sights. My suggestion to the road traveler is to camp on the butte when you enter the park. It is one of the best wake-up calls you will ever witness.
FEATURES
By Susan Bayer Ward | December 16, 1990
You may not have heard of Goulding's Monument Valley Trading Post and Lodge, but if you are a film buff you almost certainly have seen the area around it.Sheltered below a towering red rock mesa, Goulding's isituated just inside Utah near the Arizona state line on a 640-acre parcel of private land in the northwest corner of the massive 25,000-square-mile Navajo Reservation. Around it sprawls a desertscape awash in brooding, mysterious buttes and mesas that have made the adjacent Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park a magnet for American tourists, as well as a surprisingly large number of Europeans who adore Westerns, John Wayne and the charismatic backdrop that enhanced such classic John Ford films as "Stagecoach," "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," "My Darling Clementine," "The Searchers" and "Fort Apache."
TRAVEL
By GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG and GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
In June, my wife and I traveled to the Southwest for the first time, visiting Grand Canyon, Bryce and Zion national parks. We were most enthralled by the scenery of Monument Valley. Taking a half-day, 17-mile tour allowed us to see many hidden treasures of the valley. The tour is only available through Navajo guides in their four-wheel-drive vehicles, and the sights were indeed spectacular. Mesas like the Mittens, natural arches, sand dunes and petroglyphs were among the dramatic vistas we saw.
FEATURES
By Bill Donovan and Bill Donovan,The Arizona Republic | June 21, 1995
Navajo communities in Arizona are upset at movie companies that come onto the reservation and don't understand what it means to "Walk in Beauty."Instead, some Navajo residents say that filmmakers ravage tribal lands just to get a shot that may last only a few seconds in a movie.Three acres of barren ground, stripped of all vegetation, now mark the main entrance to the red rocks of Monument Valley, a legacy of the filming of "Back to the Future Part III."And, in the small Navajo community of Bodaway, where John Travolta and Christian Slater last month filmed a yet-to-be released movie about a stolen nuclear missile, deep ruts gouged by heavy-equipment vehicles are reminders of the film crew's stay.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | June 4, 1996
KENSINGTON -- The ultimate fantasy form of virtual reality is the holodeck on ''Star Trek: The Next Generation'' and its spinoffs ''Voyager'' and ''Deep Space Nine.'' (Holodeck is pronounced HOL-a-dek.)Everyone who follows ''Star Trek'' knows that each starship has at least one holodeck, which is a kind of recreation room where the ship's computer can create, by means of holography and projected matter, any scene, complete with interactive characters. Starship crew members go to the holodeck for R&R; one character uses it for combat calisthenics, another for taking women on dates to exotic planets.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1999
MY BEST SHOTAmiable AmsterdamMarlene Welty, CatonsvilleFriends from high school and I traveled to Amsterdam by train from Bremer-haven, Germany. It took five trains and about six hours to arrive. We loved the canals and the walkability of the city. The little green houses were charm-ing and the people were very friendly. We visited cheese farms and brought home some wonderful cheeses. We have fond memories of a beautiful city.READERS RECOMMEND...ArizonaJ.L. Bahlman, Baltimore"Spring is the perfect time to travel to northern Arizona.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
To say John Ford directed Westerns is seriously to underplay the point.Yes, he was probably responsible for more classic Westerns than any director, everything from 1924's "The Iron Horse," the story of the first transcontinental railroad, to 1962's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence," a nod to the idea that Western myth was often more important than Western fact.Yes, he directed both 1939's "Stagecoach" and 1956's "The Searchers," films that define the Western genre. And yes, he discovered John Wayne.
TRAVEL
By Brian Downes and By Brian Downes,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2000
In "Cinema Southwest," a comprehensive guide to Western movies and their locations, author John A. Murray writes: "We can imagine a Southwest without Bryce Canyon, or even without Zion, just as we can imagine a person without an arm or a leg, but a Southwest without Monument Valley is inconceivable." As mysterious as it is majestic, the harsh and desolate terrain that straddles the Arizona-Utah border some 20 miles north of Kayenta, Ariz., is -- thanks hugely to the classic Westerns of filmmaker John Ford -- the most recognizable landscape in the entire West.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
To say John Ford directed Westerns is seriously to underplay the point.Yes, he was probably responsible for more classic Westerns than any director, everything from 1924's "The Iron Horse," the story of the first transcontinental railroad, to 1962's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence," a nod to the idea that Western myth was often more important than Western fact.Yes, he directed both 1939's "Stagecoach" and 1956's "The Searchers," films that define the Western genre. And yes, he discovered John Wayne.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1999
MY BEST SHOTAmiable AmsterdamMarlene Welty, CatonsvilleFriends from high school and I traveled to Amsterdam by train from Bremer-haven, Germany. It took five trains and about six hours to arrive. We loved the canals and the walkability of the city. The little green houses were charm-ing and the people were very friendly. We visited cheese farms and brought home some wonderful cheeses. We have fond memories of a beautiful city.READERS RECOMMEND...ArizonaJ.L. Bahlman, Baltimore"Spring is the perfect time to travel to northern Arizona.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | June 4, 1996
KENSINGTON -- The ultimate fantasy form of virtual reality is the holodeck on ''Star Trek: The Next Generation'' and its spinoffs ''Voyager'' and ''Deep Space Nine.'' (Holodeck is pronounced HOL-a-dek.)Everyone who follows ''Star Trek'' knows that each starship has at least one holodeck, which is a kind of recreation room where the ship's computer can create, by means of holography and projected matter, any scene, complete with interactive characters. Starship crew members go to the holodeck for R&R; one character uses it for combat calisthenics, another for taking women on dates to exotic planets.
FEATURES
By Bill Donovan and Bill Donovan,The Arizona Republic | June 21, 1995
Navajo communities in Arizona are upset at movie companies that come onto the reservation and don't understand what it means to "Walk in Beauty."Instead, some Navajo residents say that filmmakers ravage tribal lands just to get a shot that may last only a few seconds in a movie.Three acres of barren ground, stripped of all vegetation, now mark the main entrance to the red rocks of Monument Valley, a legacy of the filming of "Back to the Future Part III."And, in the small Navajo community of Bodaway, where John Travolta and Christian Slater last month filmed a yet-to-be released movie about a stolen nuclear missile, deep ruts gouged by heavy-equipment vehicles are reminders of the film crew's stay.
FEATURES
By Susan Bayer Ward | December 16, 1990
You may not have heard of Goulding's Monument Valley Trading Post and Lodge, but if you are a film buff you almost certainly have seen the area around it.Sheltered below a towering red rock mesa, Goulding's isituated just inside Utah near the Arizona state line on a 640-acre parcel of private land in the northwest corner of the massive 25,000-square-mile Navajo Reservation. Around it sprawls a desertscape awash in brooding, mysterious buttes and mesas that have made the adjacent Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park a magnet for American tourists, as well as a surprisingly large number of Europeans who adore Westerns, John Wayne and the charismatic backdrop that enhanced such classic John Ford films as "Stagecoach," "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," "My Darling Clementine," "The Searchers" and "Fort Apache."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.