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By David Rosenthal and David Rosenthal,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Sunday's Travel section incorrectly stated the battle in which Confederate Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson died. He was shot accidentally by one of his men at Chancellorsville, Va.The Sun regrets the error.I took the slow roads to Richmond, bypassing the breakneck pace of Interstate 95 for a more restful and scenic route. On a two-lane bridge, I passed over the broad sweep of the Potomac, decorated with gray ribbons that marked the shallows. Later came the Rappahannock, red and swollen from the rains that had beaten Virginia's red clay.
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By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- History is written by the victors. But in this city and others across the South, losers did most of the writing -- leaving behind marble and bronze memorials celebrating the vanquished Confederate soldiers, generals and politicians of America's Civil War. Now, 135 years after that conflict ended, the winners are beginning to write some history of their own, trying to remove vestiges of a racist and oppressive past. In Richmond, where statues of Confederate generals stand on a tree-lined avenue, black leaders have fought successfully to rename two bridges -- which once bore the names of Confederate generals -- after civil rights leaders.
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By Steve Goldstein and Steve Goldstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 11, 1995
They fought the Civil War here in Richmond, Va.In some ways, they are fighting it still.At the crux of a contemporary controversy is a statue and a street.The statue commemorates the life of tennis champion and activist Arthur R. Ashe Jr., a native Richmonder. The street is Monument Avenue, a leafy boulevard of Confederate dreams.Ashe, who died two years ago of AIDS-related pneumonia, would have been 52 years old yesterday, a date chosen to break ground on Monument Avenue for the installation of his statue.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- Driving along Monument Avenue, past the massive stone statues of Robert E. Lee and other Confederate warriors, Charles Chambliss said in disgust, "Somehow the Confederacy made the losers look honorable." In recent weeks, a downtown mural of Lee has been set on fire and his reputation defended in a dispute over how history should be marked here in the capital of the Old Confederacy. It's a fight that heritage groups say embodies a resolve by civil rights leaders to rid the South of Confederate symbols.
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By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- Arthur Ashe never shied away from a fight -- not on the courts of Wimbledon, not with apartheid in South Africa, not with racism in America. And now, two years after his death from AIDS-related pneumonia, Mr. Ashe is the subject of another struggle here in his hometown.The issue this time is where to put a memorial to Mr. Ashe: On Monument Avenue, where Confederate heroes such as Robert E. Lee and Jeb Stuart stand? Or in some other part of town, where a statue of a contemporary, black American hero would not clash with tributes to men who defended the right to keep slaves?
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By New York Times News Service | June 18, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- The city of Richmond, which banned the young Arthur Ashe from lighted tennis courts because he was black, is now considering enshrining him alongside the heroes of the Confederacy.The Richmond Planning Commission will debate a proposal tomorrow to place a statue of the late Mr. Ashe, tennis star and civil rights champion, on Monument Avenue, a boulevard lined with granite giants of the Confederacy.The proposed site has angered both whites and blacks. Some whites say they want Monument Avenue to remain a memorial to rebel valor.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- Driving along Monument Avenue, past the massive stone statues of Robert E. Lee and other Confederate warriors, Charles Chambliss said in disgust, "Somehow the Confederacy made the losers look honorable." In recent weeks, a downtown mural of Lee has been set on fire and his reputation defended in a dispute over how history should be marked here in the capital of the Old Confederacy. It's a fight that heritage groups say embodies a resolve by civil rights leaders to rid the South of Confederate symbols.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | October 23, 1991
Washington -- Monument Avenue is to Richmond what the Mall is to Washington, Red Square to Moscow -- a place where heroes of yesterday are still honored, even if some are politically outdated.My Richmond friends will not appreciate my comparing Red Square, with its mausoleum of the father of Bolshevism, to Monument Avenue, with its statues of heroes of the late NTC Confederacy. However:Thirty years ago next month, I watched Soviet workmen after midnight as they lifted the body of the discredited Josef Stalin out of the tomb he shared with Vladimir Lenin.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- History is written by the victors. But in this city and others across the South, losers did most of the writing -- leaving behind marble and bronze memorials celebrating the vanquished Confederate soldiers, generals and politicians of America's Civil War. Now, 135 years after that conflict ended, the winners are beginning to write some history of their own, trying to remove vestiges of a racist and oppressive past. In Richmond, where statues of Confederate generals stand on a tree-lined avenue, black leaders have fought successfully to rename two bridges -- which once bore the names of Confederate generals -- after civil rights leaders.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- City officials seriously consider ousting a statue of Christopher Columbus from a Richmond park. A white man wearing Civil War medals lectures the black-majority City Council on the sensibilities of the "Confederate-American population."All this heat is being shed on a matter that less than two weeks ago was considered settled: A statue of the black tennis star Arthur Ashe, the city's best-known native son, was to join those of five pre-eminent Confederates on Richmond's Monument Avenue, a boulevard that the National Park Service has called "the South's grandest commemorative precinct dedicated to the heroes of the Lost Cause."
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By Mike Littwin | July 12, 1996
THERE ARE heroes and then there are heroes. They put up a statue of Arthur Ashe the other day in his hometown of Richmond, Va., on what they call the boulevard of heroes.The actual name of the street is Monument Avenue, and it's got monuments like Paris has monuments. Big heroes on big horses on a big street with big trees.The setting is majestic. But there's majesty and then there's majesty.The heroes of Monument Avenue are of the Civil War variety. And maybe Robert E. Lee is a hero. And maybe Stonewall Jackson is a hero.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 4, 1996
RICHMOND, Va. -- The old Confederate capital, which hobbled Arthur Ashe on his road to glory, had hoped to reclaim him with a grand monument saluting both his tennis triumphs and the humanitarian and scholarly pursuits of his later days.But two years after Mr. Ashe's death, Richmond seems to have bungled that effort.The monument, which was just days from being bronzed, now faces years of delay.The sculptor says he will not complete the job until he is paid, and a group of art patrons, dissatisfied with the statue, is planning an international competition for a new design.
NEWS
July 25, 1995
Some people say putting a statue of the late tennis champion Arthur Ashe among the statuary of Confederate heroes along Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va., should cause no great discomfort.They're wrong. Putting Mr. Ashe among the stony likenesses of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart is the symbolic equivalent of a smash serve to the psyche of the Old South. Take that! It will always be an irritant to those who still worship the "Lost Cause."But it is the right thing to do.To get the proper perspective you have to go back in time, not as far back as the Civil War, but around 1900, when the residential subdivision along Monument Avenue was being born.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- Arthur Ashe never shied away from a fight -- not on the courts of Wimbledon, not with apartheid in South Africa, not with racism in America. And now, two years after his death from AIDS-related pneumonia, Mr. Ashe is the subject of another struggle here in his hometown.The issue this time is where to put a memorial to Mr. Ashe: On Monument Avenue, where Confederate heroes such as Robert E. Lee and Jeb Stuart stand? Or in some other part of town, where a statue of a contemporary, black American hero would not clash with tributes to men who defended the right to keep slaves?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 13, 1995
THE RICHMOND City Council will hold a public hearing next Monday to discuss whether to erect a statue of native son Arthur Ashe on Monument Avenue.What should have been a no-brainer has turned into a major quarrel, with charges and counter-charges of racism, living in the past, trashing the past, etc., etc.The "problem" is that Monument Avenue statuary is supposed to be limited to "generals and other important heroes," and many Virginians don't believe an...
FEATURES
By Steve Goldstein and Steve Goldstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 11, 1995
They fought the Civil War here in Richmond, Va.In some ways, they are fighting it still.At the crux of a contemporary controversy is a statue and a street.The statue commemorates the life of tennis champion and activist Arthur R. Ashe Jr., a native Richmonder. The street is Monument Avenue, a leafy boulevard of Confederate dreams.Ashe, who died two years ago of AIDS-related pneumonia, would have been 52 years old yesterday, a date chosen to break ground on Monument Avenue for the installation of his statue.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 13, 1995
THE RICHMOND City Council will hold a public hearing next Monday to discuss whether to erect a statue of native son Arthur Ashe on Monument Avenue.What should have been a no-brainer has turned into a major quarrel, with charges and counter-charges of racism, living in the past, trashing the past, etc., etc.The "problem" is that Monument Avenue statuary is supposed to be limited to "generals and other important heroes," and many Virginians don't believe an...
NEWS
July 20, 1995
Putting a statue of the late tennis champion Arthur Ashe among the statuary of Confederate heroes memorialized in Richmond, Va., is the symbolic equivalent of a smash serve to the psyche of the Old South. Take that!Oh, there are those who claim putting Mr. Ashe among the stony likenesses of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart should cause no great discomfort to those who still worship the "Lost Cause." Don't believe them for a minute. The Ashe statue, placed on Monument Avenue, is meant to be an irritant.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- City officials seriously consider ousting a statue of Christopher Columbus from a Richmond park. A white man wearing Civil War medals lectures the black-majority City Council on the sensibilities of the "Confederate-American population."All this heat is being shed on a matter that less than two weeks ago was considered settled: A statue of the black tennis star Arthur Ashe, the city's best-known native son, was to join those of five pre-eminent Confederates on Richmond's Monument Avenue, a boulevard that the National Park Service has called "the South's grandest commemorative precinct dedicated to the heroes of the Lost Cause."
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