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By Dallas Morning News | June 26, 1994
The closer it gets to Wednesday's NBA draft, the more Eric Montross is reminded that a 7-foot, 275-pound body and a North Carolina basketball pedigree do not guarantee lottery status.Some scouts consider Montross the best center among this year's draft candidates. Yet Montross admitted that opinions are so varied that he could be drafted "anywhere between spots four dTC and 10."Why the disparity? The center position probably is the most difficult for NBA scouts to gauge. Seven-footers seemingly with NBA potential such as Dwayne Schintzius, Chris Washburn, Tito Horford and William Bedford have been draft busts.
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By Rafael Campo and Rafael Campo,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
Body of Work Christine Montross Penguin Press / 304 pages / $24.95 Of all the harrowing experiences that are a part of medical training, perhaps the most affecting is that of gross anatomy. No surprise, then, that the dissection of the human body attracts so many attempts at explication. Irresistible storytelling opportunities abound: The opening of the cranium is a metaphor for the opening of the medical student's mind to new ways of understanding the body; the dismemberment of a cadaver is an ironic comment on the disassociation students experience in becoming healers; and the cadaver itself is the ultimate paradox, at once the sacred vessel of our humanness and a lifeless object wrapped in plastic trash bags to keep it moist.
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SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 9, 1994
COLLEGE PARK -- In the cruel, crabby world of college basketball, Joe Smith qualifies as a miracle. Nothing less than that. For once, the hyperbole is appropriate.As a senior at Maury High School, in Norfolk, Va., he was a nice, smooth player whom the top college programs disdained. Months later, just 11 games into his freshman season at Maryland, he is the franchise. For now. And for every day he remains in school."It would be scary," North Carolina's 7-foot center, Eric Montross, said yesterday, "if I had to stick around for another couple of years and face him."
NEWS
May 23, 2007
On May 20, 2007, BARBARA ANNE LANGMACK went to be with her Lord. She is the daughter of Chris Langmack of Montross, VA. She was preceded in death by her mother, Beverly Green, her twin-sister Bevie Langmack and her older sister, Cathy Langmack. Prior to her illness, she resided in Santa Monica, CA where she was a Model, Actress and Poet. She grew up in Easton, MD and Ocean City, MD. In addition to her father, she is survived by one, brother, Chris Langmack and sister-in-law, Anne Marie Langmack, her sisters, Debbie Colie, Dorothy Derricotte and Heather Langmack.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
He is an inviting target, from the top of his nearly shaved head to the bottom of his size-18 feet. There's the buzz haircut even his teammates tease him about. There are the often mechanical, though effective, moves to the basket. And, of course, there's the jersey number: 00.Then again, North Carolina's Eric Montross undoubtedly would stand out, regardless of his tonsorial taste (he definitely would fit in at Navy) or his number. When you're 7 feet 1, 270 pounds and play center for one of college basketball's most celebrated programs, it's sort of hard to hide.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | March 27, 1991
When it comes to basketball in Indiana, loyalties stop at the state line. Hoosiers bleed Indiana red, or Purdue black-and-gold, or they don't bleed at all.So it should come as no surprise that when Eric Montross, a native son from Indianapolis, returns home with his North Carolina teammates for the NCAA's Final Four this weekend, he likely will hear the backlash of his decision to cross that line.Montross expects to be booed, native son or not."I don't think I expect a totally warm welcome," the 7-foot freshman center said, choosing his words carefully, once the Tar Heels secured a berth in the national semifinals against Kansas.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 6, 1993
NEW ORLEANS -- Eric Montross abandoned a family legacy when he chose to attend the University of North Carolina instead of Michigan.Montross' father and grandfather both were Michigan men. Grandfather Johnny Townsend, a 6-6 guard, was a three-time All-American known as the "Houdini of the Hardwood." Dad Scott Montross, now an Indianapolis attorney, was a reserve on the 1965 Final Four team."When I was growing up, I really followed the Big Ten schools," said Eric, the 7-foot, 270-pound junior center from Indianapolis's Lawrence North High.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
On May 20, 2007, BARBARA ANNE LANGMACK went to be with her Lord. She is the daughter of Chris Langmack of Montross, VA. She was preceded in death by her mother, Beverly Green, her twin-sister Bevie Langmack and her older sister, Cathy Langmack. Prior to her illness, she resided in Santa Monica, CA where she was a Model, Actress and Poet. She grew up in Easton, MD and Ocean City, MD. In addition to her father, she is survived by one, brother, Chris Langmack and sister-in-law, Anne Marie Langmack, her sisters, Debbie Colie, Dorothy Derricotte and Heather Langmack.
NEWS
January 3, 2004
On Tuesday, December 30, 2003, RUTH HELEN SCHIETLIN WILT, 90, of Montross, VA formerly of Baltimore. Mrs. Wilt was the widow of Keith Grey Wilt. She is survived by her sons and their wives, Wesley Grey and Julie Wilt of Montross and Frederick Lee and Barbara Wilt of Chambersburg, PA; four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a grandson. A funeral service will be held at 10 A.M., on Tuesday, January 6, at the Lilly-Zeiler Funeral Home, 1901 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD. Interment will follow in the Holly Hill Memorial Garden Cemetery.
NEWS
By Rafael Campo and Rafael Campo,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
Body of Work Christine Montross Penguin Press / 304 pages / $24.95 Of all the harrowing experiences that are a part of medical training, perhaps the most affecting is that of gross anatomy. No surprise, then, that the dissection of the human body attracts so many attempts at explication. Irresistible storytelling opportunities abound: The opening of the cranium is a metaphor for the opening of the medical student's mind to new ways of understanding the body; the dismemberment of a cadaver is an ironic comment on the disassociation students experience in becoming healers; and the cadaver itself is the ultimate paradox, at once the sacred vessel of our humanness and a lifeless object wrapped in plastic trash bags to keep it moist.
NEWS
January 3, 2004
On Tuesday, December 30, 2003, RUTH HELEN SCHIETLIN WILT, 90, of Montross, VA formerly of Baltimore. Mrs. Wilt was the widow of Keith Grey Wilt. She is survived by her sons and their wives, Wesley Grey and Julie Wilt of Montross and Frederick Lee and Barbara Wilt of Chambersburg, PA; four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a grandson. A funeral service will be held at 10 A.M., on Tuesday, January 6, at the Lilly-Zeiler Funeral Home, 1901 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD. Interment will follow in the Holly Hill Memorial Garden Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
MINNEAPOLIS -- Scorers should be nice to point guards, the guys who get them the ball. That wasn't the case in the St. John's locker room at Madison Square Garden last Friday night. The site of some epic boxing matches had another intriguing fight, as Erick Barkley questioned the defensive commitment of Bootsy Thornton, and the two reportedly came to blows. Before this college basketball season, Maryland's Juan Dixon was breaking bad. He's buddies with Steve Blake now, but the two tested each other last September.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart | December 5, 1997
Carroll Christian Patriots1996-97 record: 26-5Coach: Randy PetersonTop players: John Brunson, 6-3, Sr., F; Jadon Good, 6-2, Sr., F; Ethan Simonton, 6-2, Sr., F.Outlook: Having to replace three starters, the team is not as deep as it was last season, but the front line is stronger, with better jumping ability. Peterson's motion offense is geared to team play, and although there is not a lot of height, the team has overall quickness. The focus is on running, looking to force turnovers, and get the fast break.
SPORTS
By Dallas Morning News | June 26, 1994
The closer it gets to Wednesday's NBA draft, the more Eric Montross is reminded that a 7-foot, 275-pound body and a North Carolina basketball pedigree do not guarantee lottery status.Some scouts consider Montross the best center among this year's draft candidates. Yet Montross admitted that opinions are so varied that he could be drafted "anywhere between spots four dTC and 10."Why the disparity? The center position probably is the most difficult for NBA scouts to gauge. Seven-footers seemingly with NBA potential such as Dwayne Schintzius, Chris Washburn, Tito Horford and William Bedford have been draft busts.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Staff Writer | January 9, 1994
COLLEGE PARK -- Nine minutes remained when North Carolina loosened its tie, rolled up its sleeves and put away Maryland with a workmanlike 10-2 run."We really focused ourselves in right then," Eric Montross explained. "I hate to say it, but we probably realized it was crunch time. I wish we could play like that all the time."Protests from coach Dean Smith to the contrary, there are days when the defending national champions simply need to shift into another gear to pull away from an opponent, even one as worthy as the Terps were yesterday at Cole Field House.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 9, 1994
COLLEGE PARK -- In the cruel, crabby world of college basketball, Joe Smith qualifies as a miracle. Nothing less than that. For once, the hyperbole is appropriate.As a senior at Maury High School, in Norfolk, Va., he was a nice, smooth player whom the top college programs disdained. Months later, just 11 games into his freshman season at Maryland, he is the franchise. For now. And for every day he remains in school."It would be scary," North Carolina's 7-foot center, Eric Montross, said yesterday, "if I had to stick around for another couple of years and face him."
SPORTS
By DON MARCUS | December 3, 1993
The Atlantic Coast Conference is widely considered the best college basketball league in the country, but the first two weeks of the season have produced some interesting developments among the teams predicted to finish at the top.* Either North Carolina isn't as invincible as everyone believed going into the season or Tar Heels coach Dean Smith is more shrewd than even his most loyal fans give him credit for being. Did you see Smith keep Eric Montross on the floor with four fouls with his team ahead of Massachusetts late in the second half of their Preseason NIT semifinal?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
DURHAM, N.C. -- A team that has won back-to-back national championships usually has little to prove, but Duke proved a lot last night at Cameron Indoor Stadium.The fifth-ranked Blue Devils showed they are still a formidable power, at least on their home court. And they showed they are not willing to give an inch to their archrivals, North Carolina.After getting Tar Heels center Eric Montross into second-half foul trouble, Duke broke open a close game and won easily, 81-67, to capture its third straight game and send sixth-ranked North Carolina to its second straight defeat.
SPORTS
By DON MARCUS | December 3, 1993
The Atlantic Coast Conference is widely considered the best college basketball league in the country, but the first two weeks of the season have produced some interesting developments among the teams predicted to finish at the top.* Either North Carolina isn't as invincible as everyone believed going into the season or Tar Heels coach Dean Smith is more shrewd than even his most loyal fans give him credit for being. Did you see Smith keep Eric Montross on the floor with four fouls with his team ahead of Massachusetts late in the second half of their Preseason NIT semifinal?
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 6, 1993
NEW ORLEANS -- Eric Montross abandoned a family legacy when he chose to attend the University of North Carolina instead of Michigan.Montross' father and grandfather both were Michigan men. Grandfather Johnny Townsend, a 6-6 guard, was a three-time All-American known as the "Houdini of the Hardwood." Dad Scott Montross, now an Indianapolis attorney, was a reserve on the 1965 Final Four team."When I was growing up, I really followed the Big Ten schools," said Eric, the 7-foot, 270-pound junior center from Indianapolis's Lawrence North High.
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