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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. -- All day long, they came to the single-story stone schoolhouse. Some left in tears, but more seemed dazed.They came to face the most deflating in a string of tragedies this year in this Susquehanna Valley town. In Montoursville, they still talk of the third-grader killed by a school bus. They remember the high school senior who died in a car crash, and the student who committed suicide.And now, a jet goes down in a fireball and takes 16 students from the school's French club with it. Also on board for the ill-fated field trip are a teacher, her husband and three other adult chaperones.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Former Orioles pitcher Mike Mussina will be the new varsity boys basketball coach at his former high school, Montoursville (Pa.), according to the Williamsport Sun-Gazette . The Montoursville school board approved Mussina's hiring Tuesday night by an 8-0 vote, the newspaper reported. Mussina, a 1987 Montoursville grad, pitched with the Orioles from 1991-2000, going 147-81 with a 3.53 ERA. He was a five-time All-Star with the O's. But in November 2000, he signed a six-year contract worth $88.5 million with the AL East New York Yankees, upsetting Baltimore's fan base.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Former Orioles pitcher Mike Mussina will be the new varsity boys basketball coach at his former high school, Montoursville (Pa.), according to the Williamsport Sun-Gazette . The Montoursville school board approved Mussina's hiring Tuesday night by an 8-0 vote, the newspaper reported. Mussina, a 1987 Montoursville grad, pitched with the Orioles from 1991-2000, going 147-81 with a 3.53 ERA. He was a five-time All-Star with the O's. But in November 2000, he signed a six-year contract worth $88.5 million with the AL East New York Yankees, upsetting Baltimore's fan base.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. - The driveway leading to Mike Mussina's household is barely marked and guarded only by a paper sign posted alongside an anonymous street. No hunting and no trespassing. It takes a half-mile to reach the steps of an impressive wooden home so secluded that the sign might also have mentioned no accidental tourists. "For what we do for eight months of the year, it's nice to have this option for the other four months," says Mussina, who granted an interview earlier this week at his Central Pennsylvania residence.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
CLEVELAND -- A week ago, Mike Mussina turned his baseball cap over and, with a black felt pen, wrote on the inside the names of the 16 members of the Montoursville High (Pa.) French Club killed when TWA Flight 800 exploded off the coast of Long Island last month.Mussina grew up in Montoursville, a town of about 5,000, graduated from its high school, coaches football and basketball there in Mussina the off-season and plans to live in the town the rest of his life.He coached one of the young men killed, Rance Hettler.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 1996
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. -- For her first day of 10th grade at Montoursville High School yesterday morning, Desiree Phillips sported fresh white sneakers, a glinting mouthful of braces and a pin in the shape of an angel.The sneakers were the kind Desiree, 15, might wear for track-team practice. The braces shone when she chatted excitedly with other girls before the first bell. The angel was for one of the girls who would not be playing on the tennis team, going to the art room during study hall or wrestling with subjunctives in French class this year.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney | February 11, 1996
Mike MussinaHis projected role in 1996: Ace of the Orioles' starting rotation.Number crunching: Mussina has the highest lifetime winning percentage of all active pitchers -- .703, from his 71-30 record.Where he's been in the off-season: In his hometown of Montoursville, Pa. "Almost exclusively," he said.What he's been doing: Coaching football and basketball at Montoursville High, his alma mater. "Almost exclusively. I was plowing snow for a couple of months, and I've been trying to fix my driveway because it got washed out in the flood we had up here."
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1994
Montoursville, Pa.--It's raining in Central Pennsylvania. Flood warnings are in effect. And the local high school football team is on the practice field for the middle segment of triple sessions.The assistant coach in charge of the secondary reads a hole in the defense, shoots forward, grabs a safety by the waist, moves him four steps to his left, backpedals out of the play, and puts his whistle back in his mouth.Nothing about this coach's gait distinguishes him from any other high school assistant.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Montoursville, Pa.On a frigid midwinter night, in the only house in the neighborhood with a satellite dish planted in the backyard and a newly oiled pitcher's glove lying on the kitchen table, Eleanor and Malcolm Mussina are discussing their oldest son's future.In the Crossfire: Mike Mussina -- Too Much, Too Soon?He says: "Mike can't go 18-5 for the next 15 years. Nobody wins three-quarters of their games, not Sandy Koufax, not Cy Young. I'm sure the Orioles think he'll win 20 games next year.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Rod Bratton and his family left one tragedy last week and headed right into another.The family is from Montoursville, Pa., and Bratton, his wife, Jeanne, and their two teen-age sons knew most of the 21 people from that town who died in the crash of TWA Flight 800.The Brattons were sitting at a table late yesterday afternoon outside Olympic Stadium, waiting to get into the second night of the track and field competition. Just as what happened to their neighbors and friends on Flight 800 will not prevent them from flying in the future, what happened here early yesterday at Centennial Olympic Park will not deter them from attending the 1996 Olympic Games.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 1996
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. -- For her first day of 10th grade at Montoursville High School yesterday morning, Desiree Phillips sported fresh white sneakers, a glinting mouthful of braces and a pin in the shape of an angel.The sneakers were the kind Desiree, 15, might wear for track-team practice. The braces shone when she chatted excitedly with other girls before the first bell. The angel was for one of the girls who would not be playing on the tennis team, going to the art room during study hall or wrestling with subjunctives in French class this year.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
CLEVELAND -- A week ago, Mike Mussina turned his baseball cap over and, with a black felt pen, wrote on the inside the names of the 16 members of the Montoursville High (Pa.) French Club killed when TWA Flight 800 exploded off the coast of Long Island last month.Mussina grew up in Montoursville, a town of about 5,000, graduated from its high school, coaches football and basketball there in Mussina the off-season and plans to live in the town the rest of his life.He coached one of the young men killed, Rance Hettler.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Rod Bratton and his family left one tragedy last week and headed right into another.The family is from Montoursville, Pa., and Bratton, his wife, Jeanne, and their two teen-age sons knew most of the 21 people from that town who died in the crash of TWA Flight 800.The Brattons were sitting at a table late yesterday afternoon outside Olympic Stadium, waiting to get into the second night of the track and field competition. Just as what happened to their neighbors and friends on Flight 800 will not prevent them from flying in the future, what happened here early yesterday at Centennial Olympic Park will not deter them from attending the 1996 Olympic Games.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. -- All day long, they came to the single-story stone schoolhouse. Some left in tears, but more seemed dazed.They came to face the most deflating in a string of tragedies this year in this Susquehanna Valley town. In Montoursville, they still talk of the third-grader killed by a school bus. They remember the high school senior who died in a car crash, and the student who committed suicide.And now, a jet goes down in a fireball and takes 16 students from the school's French club with it. Also on board for the ill-fated field trip are a teacher, her husband and three other adult chaperones.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney | February 11, 1996
Mike MussinaHis projected role in 1996: Ace of the Orioles' starting rotation.Number crunching: Mussina has the highest lifetime winning percentage of all active pitchers -- .703, from his 71-30 record.Where he's been in the off-season: In his hometown of Montoursville, Pa. "Almost exclusively," he said.What he's been doing: Coaching football and basketball at Montoursville High, his alma mater. "Almost exclusively. I was plowing snow for a couple of months, and I've been trying to fix my driveway because it got washed out in the flood we had up here."
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1994
Montoursville, Pa.--It's raining in Central Pennsylvania. Flood warnings are in effect. And the local high school football team is on the practice field for the middle segment of triple sessions.The assistant coach in charge of the secondary reads a hole in the defense, shoots forward, grabs a safety by the waist, moves him four steps to his left, backpedals out of the play, and puts his whistle back in his mouth.Nothing about this coach's gait distinguishes him from any other high school assistant.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. - The driveway leading to Mike Mussina's household is barely marked and guarded only by a paper sign posted alongside an anonymous street. No hunting and no trespassing. It takes a half-mile to reach the steps of an impressive wooden home so secluded that the sign might also have mentioned no accidental tourists. "For what we do for eight months of the year, it's nice to have this option for the other four months," says Mussina, who granted an interview earlier this week at his Central Pennsylvania residence.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
When Mike Mussina walks into a downtown restaurant, there's no buzz, no head-turning, often no recognition that one of baseball's best pitchers is about to sit down.Think that's unusual?The reaction isn't much different when Mussina strolls through the Orioles' clubhouse. He'll nod at his teammates, chat with them, maybe joke around a little bit. But he's hardly the center of attention, which suits him just fine.All of Mussina's teammates respect him, but few know him well. He's one of them, and yet he's apart.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Montoursville, Pa.On a frigid midwinter night, in the only house in the neighborhood with a satellite dish planted in the backyard and a newly oiled pitcher's glove lying on the kitchen table, Eleanor and Malcolm Mussina are discussing their oldest son's future.In the Crossfire: Mike Mussina -- Too Much, Too Soon?He says: "Mike can't go 18-5 for the next 15 years. Nobody wins three-quarters of their games, not Sandy Koufax, not Cy Young. I'm sure the Orioles think he'll win 20 games next year.
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