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NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Announcing his candidacy for attorney general yesterday, Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler pledged vigilant prosecution of Internet crimes and environmental polluters and said he would be a vocal advocate for consumer rights. "You will see me in your town, in your neighborhood, at your church, community meeting and local courthouse," Gansler said during a lunchtime speech before supporters in a park near the office he has occupied for eight years. "I will be your lawyer, working every day on your behalf."
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
In the second sign of internal unrest in the past week, Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey's volunteer executive director for Montgomery County is quitting because of disputes with the political professional brought in to run her campaign statewide.Allen Prettyman, who had headed the campaign in Maryland's largest county since August of last year, said yesterday that he is resigning effective Dec. 1 because of personal and philosophical differences with campaign manager David Albert.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1997
Montgomery County put a price on the heads of hatemongers. But in 15 years, no one has collected.Despite promises of a bounty of up to $2,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of bigots, the county has made just one payout from its $42,000 Anti-Hate and Violence Fund: $600 for an educational brochure.County officials say they have no intention of discontinuing the fund and earlier this month renewed the legislation that authorizes it."It shows we are steadfast and aggressive when it comes to keeping hate crimes at bay," said County Council member Gail Ewing, a Potomac Democrat.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1997
After several months of political static, Montgomery County has pulled the plug on buying a Rockville radio station to broadcast traffic reports full time.Instead, the county will augment its traffic control operation -- considered by highway experts to be one of the most sophisticated in the country -- by buying time on WINX-AM to alert commuters to road conditions.County Executive Douglas M. Duncan had hoped to add the 1,000-watt AM radio station to a traffic system that includes rush-hour coverage on a cable channel and a Web site.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Armed with chocolate crabs, a talking robot and swollen pride, county leaders are in Philadelphia to answer a simple question: What's so great about Greater Montgomery?The right answers, and they bring home the title All-America City, an annual honor bestowed on 10 communities by the National Civic League.The wrong answers and they come home Sunday as they did last summer -- empty-handed.For a half-century, the civic league has spotlighted the best examples of how we live -- from picturesque townships where Dudley Do-Right might patrol to Rust Belt cities that have refused to succumb to urban ills.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
The self-proclaimed capital of good government isn't looking too good these days.In Montgomery County, where candidates issue excruciatingly detailed position papers and everyone is too civilized to be a political boss, campaign talk is centered on marital infidelities, 11 snooping private eyes, Son of Sam and improper leafletting.And that's just the state's attorney's race. Reporters heard County Council candidates "Baldy" and "Fat Boy" -- aka Michael Subin and William O'Neil -- trading personal insults as they left a TV studio.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTERS | June 9, 2007
Gilbert Gude, a liberal Republican who championed environmental causes during five terms in the House of Representatives, died Thursday of heart failure at Sibley Hospital in Washington. The longtime Bethesda resident was 84. Mr. Gude, who represented Montgomery County and, at times, parts of Howard County from 1967 to 1977, was the chief House sponsor of the bill preserving the C&O Canal from Georgetown to Cumberland, making it the narrowest -- and one of the most-used -- national parks.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
For about two centuries, Baltimore was the hub of Maryland commerce, a lode of jobs and income that powered the state's economy and dominated its hinterland.Not anymore.Sometime in 1996, Montgomery County, lawn-upholstered haven of lobbyists, federal contractors and biotech firms, overtook Baltimore as Maryland's No. 1 job reservoir.Montgomery, just outside Washington, had 388,661 jobs in the first three months of 1997, the latest period for which data is available. Baltimore, the once-mighty entrepot of shipping, immigration and manufacturing, had 376,180.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2004
A retired history teacher from Montgomery County has surrendered the touch-screen voting machine that stymied Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski last weekend, but not before an expert hired by the television show 60 Minutes was allowed to examine it and a judge ordered its return. Stan Boyd, 63, appeared in Montgomery County Circuit Court yesterday to explain why he did not immediately give back the borrowed Diebold AccuVote TS machine after election officials asked for it. After two days of wrangling, county elections supervisors recovered the voting unit at the Takoma Park home of Linda Schade, a co-founder of the Campaign for Verifiable Voting and the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit seeking greater protections in the state's new voting system.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
IN HIS best-selling little book All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, Robert Fulghum listed the things children learn in their first year of formal schooling: Hold hands and stick together, play fair, clean up your own mess, don't take stuff that isn't yours. All important things. But these days children have to learn how to read in kindergarten. And in Montgomery County they're demonstrating how to do it. Last week, the folks in Rockville announced that the percentage of kindergarten children who can read a simple story doubled from 2000 to last year.
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