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By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | February 13, 1991
Filling an 11-month vacancy, County Executive Charles I. Ecker yesterday named as economic development administrator a political castoff from the state's biggest economic engine, Montgomery County.Eckerselected Dyan Lingle Brasington, who left her job as Montgomery County's economic development director when her boss, Executive Sidney Kramer, was voted out of office last fall."Their loss is our gain," Ecker said. The executive said he had talked to Kramer, who had "the highest praise" for Brasington's work under his administration.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
Howard County Republicans unanimously chose Gail H. Bates for appointment to a vacant seat in the Maryland House of Delegates last night, but the insurgent campaign of 28-year-old conservative Anthony C. Wisniewski has thrown the process into disarray. Although Montgomery County contains just a sliver of District 14B - and none will remain after redistricting - Wisniewski won a majority of the Montgomery County Republicans to his side at a Tuesday night meeting, creating a split between Republicans in the two counties.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
ROCKVILLE -- Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan announced yesterday that he has terminated an agreement with a Canadian developer to build American Dream, a sprawling $585 million retail and entertainment complex in Silver Spring.Duncan said his decision was based on the uncertainties surrounding the project's finances. Triple Five Development's executives failed to produce "concrete evidence" of private investors willing to put their money into a project, he said.But even if the developer could document private backing, he said, the project relied too much on taxpayer support -- up to half its cost, or about $250 million to $300 million.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
A Montgomery County measure intended to protect transgender people appears headed to a voter referendum, setting up a potentially divisive debate over how far anti-discrimination laws should extend. The recently passed law protects transgender people from discrimination in housing, employment, public accommodations, and taxi and cable service, and was supposed to go into effect yesterday. But it is on hold after opponents gathered 32,000 signatures in a bid to put it on the ballot this fall.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2000
BETHESDA - James Chan brought a 10-year-old boy from Oregon into his home last month, planning to adopt him. But he soon found out that he couldn't send Jesse to public school in his new hometown without paying $8,552 in tuition Chan says he can't afford. Chan, 32, has been wrangling with Montgomery County school officials, trying to get Jesse into class. He never imagined that the county where he lives and pays taxes would charge for the boy to attend public school while waiting for the adoption to become final.
NEWS
April 2, 1996
AS THIS editorial is being written, an impasse threatens to delay passage of the state's $14 billion budget. At issue is the unwillingness of Montgomery County's lawmakers to look beyond their own parochial needs. Angry legislative leaders are in a get-even mood, spurring more ill-will and further isolating the Montgomery contingent.That only harms the state. The continuing divide between Montgomery County and the rest of Maryland detracts from efforts to move forward on programs of statewide importance.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
The Rev. Charles W. Gilchrist, a former Montgomery County executive who joined an inner-city ministry, was named yesterday to oversee an agreement to enable more than 2,000 black Baltimore public-housing families to move to mostly white, middle-class areas.U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis appointed Gilchrist as special master in the partial settlement of a desegregation lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland against Baltimore and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Montgomery County is one vote away from enacting the toughest anti-smoking law in the state.The bill being considered by the County Council would prohibit smoking in all bars and restaurants and at private functions in those places.The Montgomery measure is under heavy attack from restaurant owners, who say a ban would drive away customers and force them to lay off workers."Are our employees to be considered part of the cost of doing business in Montgomery County?" asks Brendan Flanagan, a spokesman for the 300-member local chapter of the Restaurant Association of Maryland.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
A Montgomery County Circuit judge has removed a tax cap referendum from the local November ballot. The ruling could doom a similar 2-year-old law in neighboring Prince George's County.The petition ballot question, championed by anti-tax crusader Robin Ficker and signed by more than 10,000 voters, would have required the Montgomery County Council to get voter approval for every tax increase.Judge James C. Chapin ruled yesterday in Rockville that the so-called Ficker Amendment was unconstitutional because it would have prevented the County Council from using tax-raising powers granted under state law.Further, Chapin said that because the amendment was illegal, it could not remain on the ballot even as a "straw vote" on the issue of tax increases.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan abandoned his exploration of a race for governor yesterday, saying he will instead seek re-election in 2002 as manager of Maryland's most populous county. Duncan's decision removes a sizable hurdle from the path of Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the Democrat who leads in early polls for governor. "One by one, the potential challengers to Kathleen Kennedy Townsend have chosen other options," said Matthew Crenson, a Johns Hopkins University political science professor.
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