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NEWS
By Cheri Taylor and Cheri Taylor,Capital News Service | March 24, 1993
SILVER SPRING -- The studio is lighted by nine TV spotlights focused on the stage. In the control booth at the back of the room, the crew makes last-minute equipment checks.Floor manager Katherine Thalman preps the crowd, giving the signals for when to applaud and when to stop, then starts the countdown to air time. The upbeat instrumental theme music begins, the audience applauds on cue, and host Vicky Hush introduces today's guest, U.S. Rep. Constance A. Morella, R-8th."Personal Profiles" is like many other TV interview shows -- except for its creators.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Cellmark Diagnostics Inc., a DNA forensics firm that has worked on celebrated investigations including the JonBenet Ramsey and O. J. Simpson cases, said yesterday that it has decided to remain in Montgomery County and has signed a 10-year lease at its present facility.Howard County and Prince George's County competed to lure fast-growing Cellmark away from Montgomery.But the privately held forensics company was persuaded to remain in Montgomery County by a financial incentive package that included a $45,000 county grant to help offset expansion costs, said Mark Stolorow, Cellmark's director of operations.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Anne Arundel County's financially troubled pension plan for elected and appointed officials, which has come under fire recently for its generous benefits, is one of only three such funds among Maryland's larger subdivisions.The other two, in Montgomery County and Baltimore, have separate plans for elected officials, but neither includes political appointees as Arundel does.Moreover, Montgomery County's elected officials plan is so unattractive that it has only one member. And while the plan in Baltimore is more generous than the one in Anne Arundel County, it is in great financial shape, according to Tom Taneyhill, deputy administrator for the Baltimore Retirement Systems.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
Howard County Republicans unanimously chose Gail H. Bates for appointment to a vacant seat in the Maryland House of Delegates last night, but the insurgent campaign of 28-year-old conservative Anthony C. Wisniewski has thrown the process into disarray. Although Montgomery County contains just a sliver of District 14B - and none will remain after redistricting - Wisniewski won a majority of the Montgomery County Republicans to his side at a Tuesday night meeting, creating a split between Republicans in the two counties.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
ROCKVILLE - Two men were killed in separate car accidents in Montgomery County during the weekend, police reported yesterday. David Cruces, 17, of the 2700 block of Finley St. in Wheaton was killed early yesterday in a collision on River Road at Persimmon Tree Road. Cruces was traveling east on River Road about 2 a.m. when his car collided with a westbound vehicle. A third car also was involved. The other drivers suffered minor injuries, police said. Another accident about 10 p.m. Saturday killed Slawomir Kikolski, 30, of the 13600 block of Grenoble Drive in Rockville, police said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has appointed a veteran planning administrator to head the county's Department of Inspections & Permits. Robert C. Hubbard, who worked in permitting services in Montgomery County from 1977 to 2006, beginning as a building inspector before he became director in 1996, starts in his new position Jan. 17. "Robert Hubbard brings a wealth of experience and the management skills to revamp this department with a focus on creative solutions to budget challenges and improving customer service," said Leopold, who added that Hubbard would be given the responsibility of improving efficiency in the department.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- The Montgomery County Council gave itself emergency powers yesterday and removed a spending limit for one year to take advantage of the robust economy.After a sometimes testy debate, the council voted 6-3 to ignore spending levels set last fall by a previous, and more conservative, council. It will set a new spending level April 20."This is an end run around the citizens," said council member Nancy Dacek, a Republican. "They wanted restraint on the process. They wanted us to think about what we are doing with their money."
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Lutherville-based Mid-Atlantic Health Care, LLC closed last week on a $39 million deal to add a large skilled nursing and rehab facility in Pennsylvania to its rapidly expanding holdings. Mid-Atlantic Health Care, founded in 2003, owns and operates 16 post-acute care facilities in Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. The firm has specialized in acquisitions of facilities sold by local governments and non-profits and has financing to acquire another five to 10 in the next two years, CEO Scott Rifkin said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 6, 2002
A Montgomery County woman and her two children died and her husband was critically injured in a fire that swept through a townhouse in Gaithersburg early yesterday, fire officials said. Alba Herrera, 34, and her children, Caleb, 5, and Dairicha, 23 months, died at area hospitals. Israel Herrera, 31, was in critical condition with burns and severe respiratory damage last night at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Gaithersburg. Officials said the fire started about 6:30 a.m. yesterday at 7211 Millcrest Terrace, in a townhouse development off Muncaster Mill Road.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
The first cases of West Nile virus of the season have been diagnosed in two Marylanders, a Baltimore County adult and a Montgomery County senior, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Health officials say the virus has become a seasonal problem — one case was confirmed last year. And while they say the risk is low, they urged people to take precautions such as avoiding areas of high mosquito infestation, especially at dawn and dusk, covering arms and legs when outdoors, using repellants and draining pools of water.
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