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By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
Like any effective running back, William "Boo" Beverly knows when to hit the hole and when to bounce outside.But no one at Butler County Community College in Eldorado, Kan., expected the former Old Mill star to bounce back to the East Coast to attend Montgomery-Rockville Community College.After spending a year at Butler where he was used "sparingly," the 5-foot-11, 200-pounder forfeited his full athletic scholarship to attend the Rockville-based campus where he believes he can better market himself to a four-year -- preferably Division I -- football program.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Adjunct faculty members at the Maryland Institute College of Art voted to unionize this week, creating the first union representing part-time faculty members at any four-year college in the state. The MICA adjuncts began organizing in March amid dissatisfaction with what some lecturers called shaky job security and insufficient wages. Mailed-in ballots were tallied at the board's Baltimore office Tuesday by a representative of the National Labor Relations Board, with witnesses from MICA's administration and the part-time faculty committee observing the process.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
A Montgomery County judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a conservative foundation demanding that a Montgomery County community college end its practice of offering in-county tuition rates to illegal immigrants. A spokeswoman for Montgomery College, which has campuses in Rockville, Takoma Park and Germantown, told The Baltimore Sun last year that the school's policy is to offer the reduced tuition rate to anyone who can demonstrate that he or she lives in Montgomery County or graduated from a public high school there within the past three years.
NEWS
By Matthew Coile | April 15, 2014
Maryland home education policy needs to be updated to give it more flexibility, to the benefit of all students. Current policy requires that students take either all of their classes or none of them at public school, which means homeschool students like myself cannot enroll in the public school classes that our parents have paid for in taxes. Administrators and teachers have told me they would be glad to invite me to take classes such as biology or band at their schools, but they cannot due to current policy - policy that doesn't even make sense to them.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Montgomery County and the state announced plans yesterday to create two business parks for science and technology companies, bringing the number of government-backed bioscience parks being considered in Maryland to at least five - including two in Baltimore. Montgomery County is home to more than 200 of the state's roughly 300 biotechnology companies. The proposals come just as Baltimore begins planning parks to attract the same kinds of businesses. Montgomery County Economic Development Director David W. Edgerley acknowledged yesterday that the new parks, modeled after the successful - and now full - Shady Grove Life Sciences Center in Rockville, could compete for tenants with Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 30, 1997
Las Posas is a Mexican sculpture garden created between 1954 and 1984 by eccentric British collector, poet and architect Edward James. The garden is an 80-acre site filled with surrealistic concrete sculptures of architectural elements including stairs, bridges, archways and columns. Photographer Joan Rosenstein has used the garden as a setting for her photographs of the female form. The exhibit, "The Surreal World of Las Posas," at Montgomery College combines Rosenstein's black and white photographs of women in the garden with her color photographs of the garden.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell | November 17, 2000
UMES Coach: Thomas Trotter, first season at UMES. Affiliation: Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. 1999-2000 record: 12-17 (8-10 in MEAC). Radio: None. Arena: Hytche Athletic Center (5,500). Consensus MEAC favorite: Hampton. Consensus UMES prediction: Ninth. Starters lost: Four. Outlook: There's a reason UMES is picked to finish lower than ninth in the MEAC: Howard and Delaware State did poorly enough last season to warrant lower expectations. That may be the only salvation for the Hawks, who lost two key players in Demetric Reese and Kevin Wallace.
NEWS
January 5, 2005
On Sunday, January 2, 2005, MOLLY CAITLIN COUNIHAN, age 24, of Elkridge, MD, passed away at Holy Cross Hospital. She graduated from Watkins Mill High School in 1998, Montgomery College in 2002 and received a B.S. in Special Education from Towson University at the Universities at Shady Grove in 2004. She began teaching Special Education at Patuxent Valley Middle School in Howard County, MD in September 2004. Molly is survived by her daughter Tegan Lee Counihan (3); her mother Maxine Counihan of Urbana, MD; her father Gene Counihan of Montgomery Village, MD, and her sisters Jenny Couser, Rainey Stafford, Carrie Ratliff and Erin Counihan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 13, 1998
'Parade of States'Think you're a whiz at U.S. geography? Test your knowledge of our 50 states, their flags, flora, fauna and features, Saturday at "A Parade of States" at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House and 1812 Museum.Kids can take the Great State Challenge Trivia Quiz, enjoy puzzles, join a parade through the garden and visit the museum's stone map of the United States. Adults can take a more difficult version of the quiz. Tours of the house and museum will be offered. All visitors will receive a 4-by-6-inch state flag of their choice to take home.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
SHADY GROVE - Lavina Dorris was finishing up her associate's degree last spring at Montgomery College and trying to figure out how to continue on for her bachelor's. She had the grades to transfer to the University of Maryland, College Park but commuting there from Gaithersburg on traffic-clogged Interstate 270 and the Capital Beltway could take more than an hour a day. That would be hard with her 6-year-old son, Austin, entering first grade. "We were thinking of moving, maybe up to Towson or closer to College Park," she says.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
As hopefuls in the governor's race debated transportation Tuesday night, Del. Heather Mizeur questioned Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's competence in light of the failing health care exchange he oversaw. Mizeur said the pending public-private-partnership to build the 16-mile Purple Line between  Prince George's and Montgomery counties would cost ten times the amount of money spent on the online insurance marketplace. And like the health exchange, the Purple Line deal was complicated and challenging to implement, she said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley announced $5.5 million in grants to local boards of education Wednesday to increase the use of digital technology in education and to help students earn college credits and career certification while in high school. At a news conference outside the State House, O'Malley and state school Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery announced six winners of grants under a program called the Early College Innovation Fund and seven under the Digital Learning Innovation Fund.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
An exhibit featuring portraits of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Marylanders is now on display at the Maryland Humanities Council offices in Baltimore -- and is open to the public on Thursday. The Montgomery College Arts Institute project, titled "Portraits of Life: LGBT Stories of Being," features adult and childhood pictures of residents "in nearly every aspect of community life" in Montgomery County. "The exhibition's goal is to inspire all to be more accepting and to send a message of hope and understanding to those, especially teens and young adults, who may be struggling with their own identities," the council said in a statement about the project.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
When the General Assembly passed the Maryland Dream Act, lawmakers intended to allow certain students who are undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's colleges and universities. It was a recognition that these young people represented an asset to the state to be cultivated, not a threat. But the law contained an unintended consequence no one seems to have noticed at the time, and the result has been that rather than lowering college tuition costs for these young people, some of them are now paying more for their educations.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Jonathan Jayes-Green graduated near the top of his high school class but couldn't afford to attend the four-year colleges that accepted him. Now he's an honor student at two-year Montgomery College, and he'd like to head off cuts to the school's budget. The second-year student from Silver Spring was one of hundreds from Maryland's community and independent colleges rallied in Annapolis and lobbied legislators Thursday to avert cuts in Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed higher education spending.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Sam Cameron says high school classmates used to give her "funny looks" when she told them she planned to go to a local community college after graduation instead of some prestigious four-year institution. But the 19-year-old, now in her second year at Montgomery College, says she chose the Rockville school because it offered a strong honors program with small classes — and a full scholarship. "It's a very good school," says Cameron, who lives at home with her parents in Ashton.
NEWS
By Charlene R. Nunley | July 29, 2002
IN THE news recently, two stories sharply illustrated one critical gap. Story No. 1 tells of a report by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance stating that nearly 170,000 top high school graduates from low- and moderate-income families aren't going to college this year because they cannot afford it. The report, submitted to Congress and the U.S. Education Department, warns that millions more could be locked out of college by the end...
NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff writer | December 9, 1991
Anne Arundel Community College men's basketball coach Mark Amatucci looked physically drained Saturday as he walked across the gymnasium floor to his office."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
A Montgomery County judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a conservative foundation demanding that a Montgomery County community college end its practice of offering in-county tuition rates to illegal immigrants. A spokeswoman for Montgomery College, which has campuses in Rockville, Takoma Park and Germantown, told The Baltimore Sun last year that the school's policy is to offer the reduced tuition rate to anyone who can demonstrate that he or she lives in Montgomery County or graduated from a public high school there within the past three years.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
The state Senate gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a measure that would allow illegal immigrants to qualify for in-state tuition at Maryland's public discounted rates at colleges and universities, overcoming critics who said the proposal is too costly, violates federal law and will displace U.S. citizens. The Senate is expected to vote on final passage on Monday. Wednesday's approval is sign that the measure will be successful. Emotions flared on both sides of the debate, though the discussion was largely civil.
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