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NEWS
January 3, 2000
WHAT the world does not need in 2000 is a fourth genocidal war in the former Yugoslavia. Montenegro's pro-Western President Milo Djukanovic threatens a referendum on independence. Serbia's dictator Slobodan Milosevic has supporters in the one republic that remains in federation with Serbia, as well as Yugoslav federal troops there. Montenegro is a mountainous, lightly populated, crime-ridden land ill-suited to independence. President Djukanovic is on high ground with autonomy, but should stop there.
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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | August 27, 2010
D.C. United Boskovic to play for Montenegro national team D.C. United announced Thursday that midfielder Branko Boskovic has been called to the Montenegro national team for two Euro 2012 qualifying matches. Boskovic will represent his country Sept. 3 against Wales and Sept. 7 at Bulgaria. His side will compete in the qualifying as part of group G, along with Bulgaria, England, Switzerland and Wales. Boskovic will be available for United's match at Chivas USA on Sunday and will return to United prior to the Sept.
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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | August 27, 2010
D.C. United Boskovic to play for Montenegro national team D.C. United announced Thursday that midfielder Branko Boskovic has been called to the Montenegro national team for two Euro 2012 qualifying matches. Boskovic will represent his country Sept. 3 against Wales and Sept. 7 at Bulgaria. His side will compete in the qualifying as part of group G, along with Bulgaria, England, Switzerland and Wales. Boskovic will be available for United's match at Chivas USA on Sunday and will return to United prior to the Sept.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 14, 2008
2 die as wildfires force evacuations near L.A. LOS ANGELES : Two huge wildfires driven by strong Santa Ana winds burned into neighborhoods near Los Angeles yesterday, forcing frantic evacuations on smoke- and traffic-choked highways, destroying homes and causing at least two deaths. More than 1,000 firefighters and nine water-dropping aircraft battled the 4,700-acre Marek fire at the northeast end of the San Fernando Valley and the 5,000-acre Sesnon fire at the west end. Residents downwind were warned to remain alert into the night, as winds were forecast to roar over 60 mph. Authorities confirmed more than three-dozen mobile homes burned in the Marek fire and TV news helicopter crews counted about 10 homes destroyed by the Sesnon fire.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 23, 2006
PODGORICA, Serbia-Montenegro -- Though not yet official, it appears that the family of European nations has a new member. With 95 percent of the vote counted, Montenegro's election commission confirmed yesterday that 55.4 percent of the electorate voted to secede from Serbia and become an independent nation. Under rules set by the European Union, a 55 percent majority was needed for independence. About 25,000 votes remain uncounted; most are apparently from polling stations in Podgorica where there were reports of irregularities.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2006
PODGORICA, Serbia-Montenegro -- The pro-independence movement in Montenegro appeared to hold a slim lead in yesterday's referendum on whether to sever ties with Serbia, according to unofficial results announced by CEMI, an election monitoring agency. The vote was initially put at 56.3 percent in favor of independence. That figure was later revised to 55.5 percent, just crossing the 55 percent mark established by the European Union as the threshold for independence. Turnout was 86.1 percent.
NEWS
December 27, 1996
FIVE YEARS AGO, the Milosevic regime's wanton printing of money for political purposes in Serbia provoked the first secession from federal Yugoslavia, by Slovenia. President Slobodan Milosevic is again printing dinars, to hire demonstrators favoring him after solid protests against his oppression. And this provokes the last republic still joined to Serbia -- Montenegro -- to threaten its own secession from what remains of Yugoslavia.The smaller republic's government is run by ethnic Serbs who owe their authority to the intervention of Mr. Milosevic.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2001
PODGORICA, Montenegro - Montenegro took a modest step toward independence yesterday, with early results in the general elections showing a majority of voters supporting parties that favor breaking from Yugoslavia. The governing coalition headed by President Milo Djukanovic held a narrow lead last night with over half the ballots counted in what officials described as a vote with an exceptionally high turnout of 81 percent. An adviser to the president, Miodrag Vukovic, claimed an early victory and said the coalition had won 43 percent of the early returns, predicting that Djukanovic would be able to form a majority government.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 21, 2006
CETINJE, Serbia-Montenegro -- Residents of Montenegro vote today on whether they will part ways with Serbia. Independence would be a giant step for this tiny former kingdom on the shores of the Adriatic, but as the ranks of once-proud embassies that cluster on Cetinje's main square and along its linden-lined streets attest, it has been there before. The Kingdom of Montenegro was an independent state from 1878 until 1918. Its first and only king was Nikola I. He spoke several languages, wrote poetry and died in exile when the modern state of Yugoslavia was created at the end of World War I. These days the paint is peeling from the old British Embassy.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2000
PODGORICA, Yugoslavia - President Milo Djukanovic of Montenegro suffered unspecified injuries and was hospitalized last night after his limousine crashed on a mountain road despite a security cordon meant to protect a figure whose defiance of Slobodan Milosevic was crucial in toppling the Yugoslav dictator. News of the accident initially triggered alarm in top Montenegrin government offices because it was assumed to have been an attempt on the pro-Western president's life. One senior official blurted out after hearing of the crash: "There is no way this was an accident.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
The Balkans, as a region, is continuing to fracture. This week, the people of Montenegro voted to split from Serbia; by the end of this year, Kosovo, too, may have achieved some form of independence. The Serbs have driven them all away, just as they provoked ruptures with the Slovenians and Macedonians and - with considerably more violence - the Croatians and Bosnians in the 1990s. Montenegrins want the respectability of membership in the European Union and even in NATO, but that respectability was going to continue to elude them as long as they remained hitched to a government in Serbia that has refused to cooperate with the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 23, 2006
PODGORICA, Serbia-Montenegro -- Though not yet official, it appears that the family of European nations has a new member. With 95 percent of the vote counted, Montenegro's election commission confirmed yesterday that 55.4 percent of the electorate voted to secede from Serbia and become an independent nation. Under rules set by the European Union, a 55 percent majority was needed for independence. About 25,000 votes remain uncounted; most are apparently from polling stations in Podgorica where there were reports of irregularities.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2006
PODGORICA, Serbia-Montenegro -- The pro-independence movement in Montenegro appeared to hold a slim lead in yesterday's referendum on whether to sever ties with Serbia, according to unofficial results announced by CEMI, an election monitoring agency. The vote was initially put at 56.3 percent in favor of independence. That figure was later revised to 55.5 percent, just crossing the 55 percent mark established by the European Union as the threshold for independence. Turnout was 86.1 percent.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY and TOM HUNDLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 21, 2006
CETINJE, Serbia-Montenegro -- Residents of Montenegro vote today on whether they will part ways with Serbia. Independence would be a giant step for this tiny former kingdom on the shores of the Adriatic, but as the ranks of once-proud embassies that cluster on Cetinje's main square and along its linden-lined streets attest, it has been there before. The Kingdom of Montenegro was an independent state from 1878 until 1918. Its first and only king was Nikola I. He spoke several languages, wrote poetry and died in exile when the modern state of Yugoslavia was created at the end of World War I. These days the paint is peeling from the old British Embassy.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- In its harshest terms yet, the European Union sharply criticized Serbia's failure to hand over accused war criminal Gen. Ratko Mladic and broke off talks yesterday with the Balkan state aimed at admitting it to the EU. Serbian Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica said his government has been unable to find and arrest Mladic and urged him to surrender. The escalating crisis threatened to undermine Kostunica's fragile grasp on power, and his reform-minded deputy quit in disgust.
NEWS
By TIM KENNEDY | March 22, 2006
PRISTINA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO -- Kosovo's Serbs and Albanians finally are meeting to discuss the fate of what U.N. special representative Soren Jessen-Peterson describes as the "last piece of the puzzle in the Balkans." Although a final decision on whether Kosovo, a province of Serbia in the former Yugoslavia, should become an independent country lies with the U.N. Security Council, the duration of the process and its outcome will largely depend on the behavior of the two disputing parties, which are meeting in Vienna.
TOPIC
By Robert O'Neill | November 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Montenegro has been an oasis of relative calm in the smoldering Balkan states, shielded in some small measure from the brutal, fratricidal conflicts that have ripped through the region for the better part of a decade.But in recent weeks, Montenegro's persistent steps toward independence have focused attention on this small Yugoslav republic, and worried U.S. foreign policy-makers are hoping this will not be the next Balkan hot spot.The integrity of Yugoslavia is a policy still unambiguously espoused by such NATO allies as Italy and Greece.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 9, 1999
PODGORICA, Yugoslavia -- NATO's bombs don't bother Miodrag Vlahovic as much as the swirling rumors and divided loyalties that grip Montenegro.With flak-jacketed police taking orders from one government and heavily armed military from another, with journalists hassled and politicians choosing sides, Vlahovic fears that Yugoslavia's second republic could be vulnerable to a crackdown orchestrated from Belgrade by Slobodan Milosevic."
NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIME | March 19, 2006
POZAREVAC, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was buried in his hometown yesterday on a day that had the air of a political rally, with fervent crowds chanting his nickname, "Slobo," as though he were still their leader. Although more than 60,000 defiant supporters had gathered in the capital, Belgrade, earlier in the day to commemorate the former president, the burial service here in a small central Serbian town was low-key and oddly devoid of emotion.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic remained a divisive figure in death yesterday as controversies erupted over the display of his body and his former political opponents hurried to organize a demonstration to counter the adulation expected at his funeral tomorrow. They launched a text-message campaign urging their supporters to go to the center of Belgrade and let fly balloons at the same time as the rites. The former president was found dead Saturday in the United Nations detention center at The Hague, where he was being tried on charges of genocide and war crimes before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
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