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SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | July 25, 2005
The Ravens announced today that they have signed two of their 2005 draft picks, FB Justin Green and QB Derek Anderson, to three-year contracts. Green, the Ravens' fifth-round draft choice, rushed for 1,784 yards and 22 touchdowns on 412 attempts in two years at the Montana. He was voted the Big Sky Conference Newcomer of the Year by league coaches in 2003, when he finished third in the conference in rushing with 1,146 yards (88.2 yards per game) and led the conference with 14 total touchdowns.
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BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Sheldon Myrie used to steer clear of a back room at his Beltsville workplace after he learned that federal officials discovered trace amounts of asbestos that had traveled there from a Montana mine. "They said there was nothing to worry about, but I thought hopefully there was nothing that could kill me back there because I have young children to take care of," said Myrie, who works for Atlantic Transportation Equipment Ltd., which has since moved to a nearby building. The now abandoned shop in a Prince George's County industrial park was one of more than 200 sites from New York to Hawaii where asbestos-tainted vermiculite was shipped or processed and used for insulation, fireproofing and fertilizer.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
The road to recovery for W.R. Grace & Co. was made tougher by an indictment this week alleging that the company knowingly exposed a Montana town to deadly asbestos for decades and will become tougher yet if the Columbia company takes a hard-line stance, experts said. Grace filed for bankruptcy protection in 2001 to shield itself from more than 100,000 asbestos-related lawsuits, a move necessary for it to emerge as a continuing business. The indictment "makes it a lot more difficult," said Ivan Feinseth, an analyst with Matrix Securities in New York.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
W.R. Grace & Co., the Columbia-based chemical maker pushed into bankruptcy by asbestos lawsuits, said yesterday that it expects to be indicted by a federal grand jury in connection with asbestos contamination in Libby, Mont., where it once mined vermiculite that contained the hazardous fibers. The company had disclosed last month that it was the target of a government investigation involving possible obstruction of federal proceedings, violations of federal environmental laws and conspiring with others to violate federal environmental laws.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
W.R. Grace & Co., the Columbia-based chemical company, said yesterday that it is being investigated by a federal grand jury in connection with asbestos contamination in a small Montana town where it once operated. The investigation involves possible obstruction of federal agency proceedings, violations of federal environmental laws and conspiring with others to violate environmental laws, the company said in a press release. Several former and current high-level Grace employees have also been targeted, the company said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2004
The list of candidates left in the search for the next men's basketball coach at Towson University includes at least one Division I head coach and three associate head coaches at other Division I programs, including the reigning national champs. Montana coach Pat Kennedy is expected to be interviewed in Baltimore tomorrow, according to a source close to the process. Others who have been interviewed or will be interviewed include North Carolina State assistant Larry Hunter, Clemson assistant Ron Bradley and Connecticut assistant George Blaney.
NEWS
September 7, 2003
Perry Point crew heads for Montana; DNR team home Three AmeriCorps volunteers from Perry Point joined a team of Delaware State Forest firefighters last week to battle the Mineral-Primm wildfire in Lolo National Forest, northeast of Missoula, Mont., according to Monica Davis, a spokeswoman for AmeriCorps in Perry Point. The Mineral-Primm fire consists of four wildfires that had scorched almost 24,000 acres in western Montana as of Friday afternoon. The fire was one of 20 burning in Montana, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.
NEWS
By Karen Rivers and Karen Rivers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
After two weeks of battling the Rough Draw Fire in Montana, two crews of Maryland firefighters returned home last week, and 13 AmeriCorps volunteers returned to their base in Perry Point. The group's deployment included a close call that sent them running up a mountain to escape rapidly spreading flames. The Maryland firefighters flew into Montana, where the Rough Draw Fire was just becoming a problem, and were the first crew on the scene. After several days, the fire had joined with several smaller blazes to form the Rough Draw Complex Fire.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
AmeriCorps has dispatched its third firefighting team of the season to battle wildfires in the West, said Monica L. Davis, a spokeswoman for the national volunteer service's Northeast Region office in Perry Point. This team of volunteers was called on short notice and left from Harrisburg, Pa., on Sunday night to battle the Rough Draw Fire in the Gallatin National Forest near Livingston, Mont. The Rough Draw Fire was started by lightning Aug. 9. The location is not easily accessible, so the effort to contain it includes four helicopters with bucket drops and other air support.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 2003
LIBBY, Mont. - When Bob Dedrick had a routine chest X-ray before a gall bladder operation, the doctor returned with the results and a question. "Where do you live?" the doctor asked. "Libby, Montana," Dedrick said. "That explains it." This small town of 2,800 residents in remote northwestern Montana has become shorthand for a public health disaster of tragic proportions - and lingering questions of corporate and governmental culpability. The scarring that the doctor saw on Dedrick's lungs identified his hometown as clearly as a local accent, signaling that he, too, had inhaled the microscopic fibers of asbestos that swirled through Libby for decades.
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