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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER and ANDREW SCHNEIDER,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
CENTERVILLE, Mont. -- Dennis Yatsko loved good popcorn, but making it killed him. The poison that destroyed his lungs was in the heated vapors of butter flavoring he used to produce tons of America's favorite snack for his century-old bar and customers as far as two states away. Doctors apparently misdiagnosed the disease that destroyed Yatsko's lungs. Now his daughter, Debbie Medvec, fears the same thing might be happening to her. "It's where Dad popped and bagged the corn from 2 to 7 each morning," said Dale Yatsko, one of Dennis' eight children, pointing to a 10-foot by 12-foot concrete-block shed, its walls and ceilings stained butter yellow.
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SPORTS
March 17, 2006
TOP PERFORMERS Boo Davis, Wisconsin-Milwaukee -- Davis scored 26 points as the 11th-seeded Panthers ousted the No. 6 seed Sooners. Christian Maraker, Pacific -- Maraker scored 30 points, including a game-tying three-pointer with nine seconds left in regulation, and added nine rebounds as the No. 13 seed Tigers took the ACC's Eagles to double overtime. Marcelus Kemp, Nevada -- Kemp scored 34 points but it wasn't enough as the fifth-seeded Wolf Pack fell to the Montana Grizzlies. SURPRISES Montana -- The 12th-seeded Grizzlies earned their first NCAA tournament win since 1975.
SPORTS
By ROBYN NORWOOD and ROBYN NORWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
SALT LAKE CITY -- It felt more like time for brunch than for basketball, and Boston College was almost toast. After a run to the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament title game and a narrow loss to Duke, the Eagles became a chic pick for the Final Four. They almost didn't make it to the second round. Pacific, its upset credentials established after upending Pittsburgh last season and Providence two seasons ago, very nearly pulled off its biggest yet, taking the fourth-seeded Eagles to double overtime before losing, 88-76, in a first-round NCAA tournament game that began at 10:40 a.m. local time at Salt Lake City's Huntsman Center.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 2006
KALISPELL, Mont. -- The camera follows the teenager as she showers for her night out and looks down to discover the drain swirling with blood. She turns and sees her methamphetamine-addicted self cowering below, oozing from scabs she has picked all over her body because the drug made her think there were bugs crawling beneath her skin, and she lets out a scream worthy of Psycho. Turn on prime-time television here, and chances are this or another horror commercial like it will interrupt.
NEWS
By JANET HOOK and JANET HOOK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 19, 2006
BOZEMAN, Mont. -- A huge outfitting store on the edge of this mountain-ringed town should be a conservative bastion: The ranchers and farmers who come to shop tend to be reliable Republicans. But here at Murdoch's Ranch and Home Supply - amid the calf pens, muck buckets and bags of horse feed - there are signs of trouble for the GOP. And that could be bad news for the party from coast to coast. Jack Bolender, a retiree who voted for three-term Sen. Conrad Burns because the Republican delivered mounds of federal aid to Montana, said he was deserting the incumbent in the state's 2006 election.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 8, 2006
Sometimes, you've got to wonder what some people could possibly be thinking, and by some people I mean Joe Montana and the Rolling Stones and the NFL and whoever was in charge of Super Bowl security - because somehow Gilbert Gottfried got a media credential. Actually, I like Gilbert. He does a nice duck imitation ("Afffflac!!!") and he totally bailed me out when nobody showed up on Super Bowl media day dressed like a turnip. Montana is another story. Rumor has it that he didn't show up for the Super Bowl Most Valuable Players ceremony because the NFL wouldn't guarantee him $100,000 in promotional income.
TRAVEL
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2006
Though fiercely buffeted by political crosswinds last year, Amtrak apparently has survived the political pressure that culminated with the firing of the company's president. As of now, the existing network will continue through this year. The high-speed Acela trains in the Northeast are back after a service suspension, and the company carried its most riders ever last year. Passenger trains will roll once again on BC Rail's scenic routes in British Columbia. The Whistler Mountaineer will begin service on the three-hour run between North Vancouver and Whistler, and two-day trips over the Fraser Discovery Route from Whistler to Jasper have been added to the existing Rocky Mountaineer service, which features GoldLeaf Dome Cars.
NEWS
November 8, 2005
On November 3, 2005, MRS. PULLEYVisitation Wednesday 2 to 8 P.M. at 2140 N. Fulton Ave. The family will receive friends on Thursday, 10:00 wake funeral to follow at 10:30 at Morning Star Baptist Church, 1063 W. Fayette St.
SPORTS
By Don Pierson and Don Pierson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 8, 2005
CANTON, Ohio - Dan Marino had challenged Miami Dolphins fans everywhere to "overrun Canton" for his Hall of Fame induction, and they had responded all weekend in astonishing numbers. So minutes before the speeches yesterday, Marino lowered a shoulder into fellow inductee Steve Young backstage. "I need somebody to call a corner blitz and blindside me," Marino said. The two quarterbacks were nervously getting ready for one more big appearance in front of a football crowd. Typically, neither let anybody down.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Along with his four Super Bowl victories, Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana is probably best remembered as an imperturbable, clutch performer with proverbial ice water in his veins. A few years ago, though, the unflappable Montana discovered that what coursed through his veins - blood at a dangerously high pressure - was a greater threat than any NFL defense ever posed. "I was the typical American in that I liked all the things that are bad for you, and not only did I like them but I liked them doubled," Montana said yesterday during a stop in Baltimore to publicize blood pressure awareness and treatment.
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