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By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,Chicago Tribune | May 20, 2007
KALISPELL, Mont. -- By her own count, Sarah Knapton has been "married" more than 250 times. So when she recently took her vows before Municipal Judge Heidi Ulbricht, it was just another day for her. "I do," she said, and at that, Ulbricht pronounced her married, by proxy, for the umpteen time to the man by her side, Kyle Kirkland, a former high school classmate. It wasn't an altar; Knapton and Kirkland really weren't married to each other. In fact, Knapton has a steady boyfriend, and Kirkland is happily married to someone else.
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NEWS
By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
Fort Smith, Mont. -- Take a drive down just about any back road in this, the fourth-largest state in the country, and you might come upon a ghost town or a small scattering of abandoned buildings. Some of these suggest an earlier time of prosperity and evidence the precariousness of existence in what can be a harsh place to scratch out a living, leaving unanswered questions: Did the mine play out? Was it disease or some other misfortune? A disaster? Why do some places survive and others don't?
NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,Los Angeles Times | April 1, 2007
Plentywood, Mont. -- Dave Grimland spent nearly 30 years as a Foreign Service officer -- "telling the U.S. side of the story," he says -- in Bangladesh, India, Cyprus, Turkey and other nations with large Muslim populations. He wrote ambassadors' speeches, arranged cultural gatherings, and more than once hunkered down as angry mobs gathered outside the embassy to protest American policy. Now retired and living in rural Montana, Grimland is once again telling a side of the story -- only this time, in quiet pockets of the Big Sky State, he's trying to tell the Muslim side to non-Muslim Americans.
TRAVEL
January 28, 2007
I took this photo at the Little Bighorn Battlefield in Montana, the site of the battle between Lt. Col. George Custer and the Sioux. My wife and I visited the area in August 2005 as part of an Elderhostel program on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. I was captivated by the image of the Indians on their horses with the Montana plains and sky visible through the outline of the sculpture. It was emblematic of the vanishing Plains Indians to whom it is dedicated. Tom Scheurich, Fallston
TRAVEL
By Chris Erskine and Chris Erskine,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
BIG SKY, MONT. / / You wake up to a fresh handkerchief of snow draped over the mountain, 4 inches deep and as light as linen, atop a 5-foot base. You lug your skis to the lift. "Is it open?" you wonder, since so few fellow skiers are around. It's open. It's Montana. Get used to it. This is the land where the circus doesn't stop, where skiing is an escape from the crowds and the traffic, where a ski lift doesn't have a line like Starbucks, 20 deep and a little ornery. Talk about your sugar highs.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 22, 2006
BUTTE, Mont. -- This was once "the Richest Hill on Earth." Home to vast mineral wealth, Butte was a storied mining town, providing one-third of the nation's copper for the dawning electric age more than a century ago. Today, that hill has a hole, a toxic abyss framed by a gash where the land was. The pit, 1 by 1 1/2 miles, is the center of the nation's largest string of Superfund sites, stretching 140 miles mostly along waterways, local officials say....
NEWS
November 10, 2006
pg 7a Other developments Republican Sens. George Allen of Virginia and Conrad Burns of Montana concede defeat. The White House signals that it wants the current Senate to confirm its nominees for defense secretary and U.N. ambassador.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2006
LEWISTOWN, Mont. -- E-mailing underage boys might be the most original sin of this campaign season, but in Big Sky country, folks are talking about the old-fashioned sleaze that Jack Abramoff spread around. "They've been hammering on me for 18 months," said Republican Sen. Conrad Burns of Montana, who got more Abramoff-related money than anyone else in Congress and might well be unseated as a result. An iron law of modern elections holds that incumbents lose only in the very rarest of circumstances, such as illness or scandal.
TRAVEL
June 11, 2006
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ-- The North Platte and South Platte rivers meet in which state -- Montana or Nebraska? (Answer below) QUIZ ANSWER (FROM ABOVE) Nebraska. Source: National Geographic Bee.
NEWS
By MAURICE POSSLEY and MAURICE POSSLEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 4, 2006
Not long after Fay Rumsey was married in Sherwood, Mich., in 1901, he and his wife, Sarah, went west. They homesteaded along Sarpy Creek in southeastern Montana and raised 12 children. Their world fell apart in 1918 when Rumsey, 49, was convicted under the state's harsh sedition law and sentenced to two to four years in prison. He was among 78 people who were convicted of sedition in Montana during the waning days of World War I. Rumsey and 40 others were sentenced to prison terms of one to 20 years and fined from $200 to $20,000.
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