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SPORTS
By Rick Plumlee and Rick Plumlee,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1993
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The circus is over, Joe Montana's act is coming to Kansas City.The Chiefs and San Francisco finally reached a compromise last night and completed the trade for the 49ers quarterback."
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | December 25, 1990
Take the best quarterback of his time -- maybe of any time.Give him a goal that no quarterback has achieved.Match him against a barracuda defense that has knocked out six quarterbacks in the past eight weeks.The way the National Football League playoff picture is shaping up, that is likely to be the challenge for quarterback Joe Montana and the San Francisco 49ers in their first playoff game, as they attempt to become the first team to win three straight Super Bowls.It's certain that the Philadelphia Eagles, who specialize in knocking out quarterbacks, will play the Washington Redskins and the Chicago Bears will play either the Dallas Cowboys or the New Orleans Saints in the first round of the National Football Conference playoffs the weekend of Jan. 5-6.If the Cowboys beat the Atlanta Falcons Sunday or the Saints lose to the Los Angeles Rams Monday night, Dallas would go to Chicago.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | October 10, 1993
Marty Schottenheimer, the coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, will never be known as a wild and crazy guy.That's why it was so surprising last week when Schottenheimer showed up at a news conference wearing a turban and appearing to peer into a crystal ball.In a perfect sound bite for the TV cameras, Schottenheimer said, "Montana . . . Joe . . . It's very cloudy . . . Some sense of uncertainty . . . Percentages are 50-50."Schottenheimer then removed the turban and said, "I hope I made my point.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | December 4, 1994
In retrospect, it seems like such a simple and logical move.The San Francisco 49ers' decision a year ago to ship out a quarterback who's now 38 and go with a quarterback who's now 33 was a sound football move.After all, the 33-year-old quarterback was just named Player of the Month and may be on the way to MVP honors.The 38-year-old quarterback is sidelined with a foot injury and is angrily denying rumors he's going to retire at the end of the season.What made the decision difficult, though, was the fact that the two quarterbacks were Steve Young and Joe Montana.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | September 1, 1991
When coach George Seifert of the San Francisco 49ers was ducking questions about Joe Montana's elbow Monday, he said, "We're still in the evaluation mode."That prompted a reporter to try to crack a joke, saying, "You sound like those guys in the U.S.S.R." Seifert stormed out of the news conference.Seifert later said: "I'm embarrassed by it. At that moment, the remark about the U.S.S.R. didn't strike me as funny."The next day, the 49ers put Montana on the injured-reserve list for at least four weeks.
SPORTS
August 21, 1991
Dan Marino, the golden-armed quarterback of the Miami Dolphins, cashed in yesterday when he agreed to perhaps the richest contract in NFL history.Neither Dolphins management nor Marino would release details of the contract other than it was a five-year extension of his current pact which will pay him $1.6 million this year.Several newspapers reported yesterday that Marino and his agent, Marvin Demoff, negotiated a contract for $25 million, including a $3 million signing bonus."This gives security for my family," said Marino, 29, who has three sons, ages 2 to 5. "As a dad, you always want that for your kids.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Along with his four Super Bowl victories, Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana is probably best remembered as an imperturbable, clutch performer with proverbial ice water in his veins. A few years ago, though, the unflappable Montana discovered that what coursed through his veins - blood at a dangerously high pressure - was a greater threat than any NFL defense ever posed. "I was the typical American in that I liked all the things that are bad for you, and not only did I like them but I liked them doubled," Montana said yesterday during a stop in Baltimore to publicize blood pressure awareness and treatment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1998
BILLINGS, Mont. -- When people think of Montana, what comes to mind are trophy trout, no daytime speed limit and the occasional mountain hermit. That is all well and good, but state officials would like to project something entirely new: the last best place for rich foreigners to hide their money.In December, Montana completed regulations on a new law that makes it the first state to open its doors as an offshore banking haven, allowing special depositories for wealthy overseas clients seeking privacy and protection for their money.
NEWS
By JANET HOOK and JANET HOOK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 19, 2006
BOZEMAN, Mont. -- A huge outfitting store on the edge of this mountain-ringed town should be a conservative bastion: The ranchers and farmers who come to shop tend to be reliable Republicans. But here at Murdoch's Ranch and Home Supply - amid the calf pens, muck buckets and bags of horse feed - there are signs of trouble for the GOP. And that could be bad news for the party from coast to coast. Jack Bolender, a retiree who voted for three-term Sen. Conrad Burns because the Republican delivered mounds of federal aid to Montana, said he was deserting the incumbent in the state's 2006 election.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
ATLANTA -- In a throwback to the era of dynasties in the NFL, three key figures on two of the sport's greatest dynasties were selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame yesterday. Joe Montana and Ronnie Lott, the offensive and defensive heart of the San Francisco 49ers teams that won four Super Bowls in the 1980s, were elected along with Dan Rooney, the president of the Pittsburgh Steelers, who won four Super Bowls in the 1970s. Their teams were among the best ever and are being matched by NFL Films in the Millenium Bowl, the second half of which will be shown on ESPN2 tomorrow night.
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