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SPORTS
By Milton Kent | December 15, 1995
In the interest of assisting our dear readers in selecting just the right present for their favorite sports fan (and mostly because it's a darned easy column to write before two weeks of vacation), today we offer the second annual "Media Watch Holiday Gift Book, Video and CD-ROM Guide."On the bookshelfOne of the recent publishing trends is the "coffeetable" book, the oversized, sometimes overpriced, tome filled with lush pictures and just a few words to set the scene.Two of the most notable additions to this trend come from two larger-than-life figures, Cal Ripken and Joe Montana, whose books stand as pseudo-autobiographies.
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SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 1, 1995
NBC covers the AFC as its portion of the NFL package, yet the network has turned to two pretty high-profile former NFC quarterbacks to bolster its coverage and, more importantly, give the ratings a boost.In the marquee hires of the football broadcast season, the Peacock gang plucked away former New York Giant Phil Simms to join Dick Enberg and Paul Maguire in its reconfigured No. 1 booth team, while adding former San Francisco 49er Joe Montana to its "NFL on NBC" pre-game show as a studio analyst.
SPORTS
July 29, 1992
San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana says his arm isn't getting worse. But it isn't getting better, either.Montana, who had surgery in October to repair a torn tendon in his right shoulder, sat out all of last season. Now the tired arm is preventing him from throwing at 49ers training camp today and tomorrow."The throwing is not helping it any," Montana said after skipping practice. "I can go out there and throw, but what's the use if it doesn't get any better. I just want it to go one way or the other.
SPORTS
By San Francisco Chronicle | January 23, 1991
San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana underwent surgery on his right hand yesterday morning at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City, Calif., the 49ers announced. Dr. Michael Dillingham, 49ers team physician, inserted two screws in the fifth metacarpal of Montana's throwing hand in an operation that lasted an hour.The 49ers said Montana will wear a splint for about four weeks. The screws will be removed in two months.Montana can begin throwing in late April, three months before training camp begins in July.
SPORTS
By Ira Miller and Ira Miller,San Francisco Chronicle | April 20, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- Just when it seemed the Joe Montana saga couldn't get any stranger, it did.Montana turned down the offer to be reinstated as San Francisco 49ers starting quarterback and renewed his demand to be traded to the Kansas City Chiefs.The 49ers and Chiefs still couldn't agree on trade compensation yesterday, and, for the second time in three days, talks broke off between team presidents Carmen Policy and Carl Peterson.Nonetheless, the 49ers' Policy all but acknowledged Montana had played his last game for San Francisco since he turned down its No. 1 offer.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Bert Rice loves Montana.Now, don't get the Odenton man wrong. There's nothing wrong with Maryland. But it's just not Montana."It's just a different place," Mr. Rice said of his home state. "You have more time out for people in Montana. It's a scramble here. It's rush rush here."But if you go to Montana, people there will want to visit with you. If you stop to get gas, the people there will keep you there so they can talk to you. Montana just tugs at me."Evidently, Montana tugs at many of its displaced residents.
SPORTS
By Glenn Dickey and Glenn Dickey,San Francisco Chronicle | April 19, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- In promising Joe Montana that he will be the starting quarterback if he returns to the NFL team, the San Francisco 49ers are committing suicide.All you have to do is look at what has happened the last two seasons.Two years ago Montana was unquestionably the starting quarterback going into training camp. Midway through, he developed a twinge in his elbow. When Montana was sidelined, Steve Young became the starting quarterback, for which the 49ers were totally unprepared.The offense was geared to Montana's abilities, not Young's; it took the 49ers weeks before they even changed their offensive thinking to accommodate Young throwing with his left arm. That was a big factor in the 49ers' stumbling start, which eventually cost them a spot in the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Evan Grant and Evan Grant,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 15, 1990
ATLANTA -- Atlanta had traveled light years. Just four games into rebuilding, the Falcons were contenders, crashing into second place in the National Football Conference West and threatening to crash the defending world champion San Francisco 49ers.Then Joe Montana hit town.With all the talk the Falcons leveled at the 49ers and with all the energy Atlanta directed into yesterday's game at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, Montana simply stepped back in the pocket to school -- and scald -- the defense.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Liz F. Kay and Gadi Dechter and Liz F. Kay,sun reporters | December 13, 2007
The recently promoted director of detention in Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services was found to have committed child abuse at a previous post in Montana, unsealed records released last night show. Chris Perkins acknowledged that he is the unnamed "Staff No. 2" in the redacted report issued in January 2006 by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. The report states that Perkins "directly abused or neglected youth under his care" while running a military-style academy for juvenile offenders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 1998
HELENA, Mont. -- Montana's one-of-a-kind daytime speed limit -- written in law as whatever speed is "reasonable and proper" and widely interpreted as wide open -- has been struck down by the Montana Supreme Court, prompting fears that the lack of even the vague limit will lead people to drive at breakneck speeds.In a 4-3 ruling on Wednesday, the court said the law was unconstitutionally vague and did not give drivers fair notice of what speed was fast enough to be illegal."The court held that based on speed alone you cannot cite somebody because they don't reasonably know what speed will violate the law," Beth Baker, Montana's chief deputy attorney general, said yesterday.
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