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SPORTS
October 8, 1991
Joe Montana will wait until the end of the week before deciding whether to undergo season-ending -- and possibly career-ending -- surgery on his ailing right elbow.The 35-year-old San Francisco 49ers quarterback experienced a flare-up of elbow pain Saturday during a brief workout, and will undergo further evaluation during the week before deciding if the only possible remedy is surgery."We are proceeding with our original approach to this problem, which was discussed [Sept. 9] . . . what I said then was, 'If rest and rehabilitation failed to solve Joe's elbow problem, the next alternative might be surgery,' " Dr. Michael Dillingham, the 49ers' team physician, said.
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | December 12, 1990
Joe Montana's paycheck finally is matching his accomplishments.The four-time Super Bowl quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers, who was the National Football League's fifth-highest-paid player in 1989, vaulted into first place this year when he became the first player in league history to average more than $3 million.According to the annual salary survey conducted by the NFL Players Association, Montana signed a four-year, $13 million contract this year, averaging $3.25 million. This year, Montana also became the first player to earn $4 million in base salary.
SPORTS
By Ann Killion and Ann Killion,Knight-Ridder | March 12, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Joe Montana's rehabilitation from elbow surgery has been interrupted for more than a week because of arthroscopic surgery on his left knee.Montana said yesterday that he had the surgery Saturday to clean out cartilage from his knee in an effort to be completely healthy by the opening of San Francisco 49ers training camp in July."I should have had it a year and a half ago," Montana said. "I kept postponing it. But it kept acting up and I didn't want another problem going into camp."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 1, 1995
MIAMI -- This is the way it was meant to turn out. Joe Montana's time has passed. Dan Marino's is long overdue.It was a glorious duel for a half, but for once Montana threw the killer interception, and now they both move on.Montana, to the twilight of his career.Marino, to the AFC semifinals.Miami 27, Kansas City 17.The Dolphins saw it coming."He was a little more pumped than I've seen him -- ever," wide receiver O. J. McDuffie said of Marino."Usually, Dan is really mellow the day before the game.
NEWS
By Kathleen Clary Miller | May 12, 2008
HUSON, Mont. - When my husband and I retired and moved from Southern California to the Missoula, Mont., area, we imagined a quiet existence in a corner of the country that doesn't make national news. The local paper covers stories about whether to allow Hooters to build on a busy street corner, the reconstruction of a dam that threatens trout fishing season, and who can shoot wild turkeys on whose property. Ahh, the simple life, out of the media glare! But suddenly Missoula is a regular in the national headlines.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Lisa Respers and Joe Mathews contributed to this article | July 31, 1995
ROUNDUP, Mont. -- From a log house in the foothills of the Bull Mountains, Rodney O. Skurdal wages war against the officials of Musselshell County.He spares no one. The sheriff, the county attorney, the judge, the county commissioners, all deemed traitors to the "country" of Montana. He summons them before a supreme court of his own creation, a tribunal of "Freemen" who obey what they view as God's laws, refuse to pay taxes, and threaten to hang treasonous public officials.Rodney Skurdal is among a small but nascent group of anti-government tax protesters confounding officials in Montana.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | November 29, 1992
Joe Montana, who led the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl victories, may wind up making it difficult for them to win a fifth by simply standing on the sidelines.Montana's return to the practice squad last week was a media event with seven television crews and at least 26 writers recording every pass.When it was over, he was asked if he thought he could play today against the Philadelphia Eagles."Yeah, sure I could," he said.He won't because the 49ers aren't activating him and Steve Young is entrenched as the No. 1 quarterback.
SPORTS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | December 13, 1994
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Johnny Unitas, who threw for more than 40,239 yards and 290 touchdowns before most people could comprehend 30,000 and 200, took a few moments recently to ponder the Joe Montana-Dan Marino debate.Unitas, 61, is a spokesman for Merck & Co. Inc., a pharmaceutical firm. The former Baltimore Colts great has toured the country since August to inform men 50 and over about the risks of prostate disease, which claims 40,000 men annually.The last time Montana faced the Dolphins' Dan Marino was in the 1984 Super Bowl, when Montana led San Francisco to the second of four titles during his reign.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | January 8, 1994
KANSAS CITY -- Joe Montana, who has done just about everything there is to do in the NFL playoffs, is now ready to tackle what might be his toughest task: making Marty Schottenheimer a playoff winner.Schottenheimer, the Kansas City coach, and Montana, who'll play his first playoff game in a Chiefs uniform against the Pittsburgh Steelers today, are something of an odd couple in the playoffs.Montana is one of the most successful playoff performers in NFL history.He and Terry Bradshaw are the only quarterbacks to win four Super Bowls, and Montana is 14-5 in playoff games as a starter.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 12, 1995
The Montana family huddled around the television set the other night in San Francisco to watch the NFL Films documentary on their husband, father and son, Joe, widely TC acclaimed as the greatest quarterback of all time.That is, everyone except the subject of the special, which premieres tonight (TNT, 8 o'clock, with repeats through the week)."I hate to hear my own voice, and I was watching the game," said Montana on a conference call yesterday. "I was peeking back and forth. It's tough to take.
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