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By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When Keron DeShields committed to Montana in 2011, his goal was to get as far away from Baltimore as possible . But after three years of being 2,300 miles away, the former Pallotti and Towson Catholic guard said he's looking forward to closing out his college career at Tennessee State in Nashville, where he'll be able to make a much shorter trip home. “It took me from Montana probably all day on the plane just to get home,” said DeShields, who signed with the Tigers earlier this month.
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NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Matt Rosendale, a Republican running for Congress in Montana, left his native Maryland years ago.   He was, according to his campaign web site, eager to leave the " inherent liberal socialism of the east coast. " But there's one part of Maryland that Rosendale has not left behind: the accent.  "It is air tahm to seize the moment," Rosendale tells supporters in a political ad, as first reported by The Daily Beast.   "I blieve we must do something to stem the tide of blOAWted, OAWverreaching, govermint grOAWth.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | May 21, 2013
Martin Breunig, the last Maryland signee of the Gary Williams era, is transferring to Montana after two underwhelming seasons at Washington. "We are very excited about signing Martin Breunig at the University of Montana," Grizzlies coach Wayne Tinkle said in a news release. "He's a strong, athletic post player, and he really adds good size and strength to our front line. " Breunig pledged to Williams in the spring of 2011 out of St. John's Northwestern Military Academy in Delafield, Wis. The native of Leverkusen, Germany picked the Terps over offers from Virginia and several mid-major programs.
SPORTS
October 9, 1991
Quarterback Joe Montana has been told by San Francisco 49ers team doctors that he should undergo elbow surgery, but the three-time Super Bowl MVP is seeking other medical opinions.Any surgery would end Montana's 1991 season as well as threaten his career with the 49ers, who have won four Super Bowls with Montana as their quarterback."It's time we address the situation if is not going to get better," 49ers president Carmen Policy said. "If rest and rehabilitation is not going to get Joe back onto the field this season then it's time to say, 'Let's get a start on whatever gives us the best opportunity that will get him back for next season.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | May 17, 1992
Recently my family and I, in an effort to explore this great nation's Western heritage and possibly get eaten by bears, visited Montana.Montana is a very large Western state located near, or possibly even north of, Canada. Not a lot of people live there. I would estimate that I met two-thirds of the population right at the airport car-rental counter. The population is so small, in fact, that Montana is about to lose one of its two congresspersons. This works out to a 50 percent reduction in congresspersons.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | May 19, 1995
The TV Repairman:Usually, a guy hangs 'em up, signs a few autographs and steps directly in front of the television camera to emote and he's, well, found wanting. Jack Buck tells the story of one of his broadcast partners being so bad he was fired at halftime (no, he won't name him). The name of the game is marquee, not matter, understand.However, off a simple NBC teleconference confirming it has indeed signed Joe Montana as a part-time "NFL Live" studio analyst, the former great quarterback flashed promise.
SPORTS
By Wayne Washington and Wayne Washington,Knight-Ridder | May 15, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Quarterback Joe Montana's recovery from the right elbow problems that forced him to miss last season suffered a setback yesterday when he had surgery to alleviate irritation caused by scar tissue, the San Francisco 49ers announced.Montana underwent what a team official described as a minor procedure performed by team doctor Michael Dillingham at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City and should be able to begin throwing a football again in two to three weeks.In a statement, the team said: "The procedure loosened some adhesions to eliminate minor annoyance Joe was experiencing in his elbow.
SPORTS
By Nancy Gay and Nancy Gay,Knight-Ridder | October 10, 1991
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- The final resort for Joe Montana finally came to be: After weeks of speculation and concerted efforts to avoid the knife, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback underwent elbow surgery last evening.A three-man surgical team -- led by 49ers team physician Michael Dillingham and associates Dr. Gary Fanton and Dr. Warren King -- performed the operation to repair his injured right elbow, beginning about 5:30 p.m. at Stanford Medical Center.Dillingham reported the surgery, which lasted about 1 hour, 30 minutes, went well and said Montana was resting comfortably.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | May 21, 2013
Martin Breunig, the last Maryland signee of the Gary Williams era, is transferring to Montana after two underwhelming seasons at Washington. "We are very excited about signing Martin Breunig at the University of Montana," Grizzlies coach Wayne Tinkle said in a news release. "He's a strong, athletic post player, and he really adds good size and strength to our front line. " Breunig pledged to Williams in the spring of 2011 out of St. John's Northwestern Military Academy in Delafield, Wis. The native of Leverkusen, Germany picked the Terps over offers from Virginia and several mid-major programs.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
As the Newtown, Conn., community looks for comfort in the wake of one of the most deadly school shootings in history, it will be able to tap into the hearts of students in Baltimore City. Students at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School have joined a national movement called "Paper Hearts Across America," an initiative that started over construction paper and scissors in the home of a Billings, Mont., family and has sparked a nationwide effort to send millions of hearts to Connecticut.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Lois Roena Pyle, a retired secretary for Baltimore City's social services office who later worked for Baltimore County, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Oct. 3 at the Ware Presbyterian Village in Oxford, Pa. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 90. Born Lois Roena Anderson in Havre, Mont., she was the daughter of a dry-goods merchant, and a homemaker. She attended the University of Montana and graduated from the Kinman Business College in Spokane, Wash. As a young woman, she took flying lessons.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 21, 2012
I wrote today about a Johns Hopkins study that found a decline in circumcisions has cost the country $2 billion in extra medical costs in the past decade. The Hopkins scientists say they think fewer babies are getting the procedure because states aren't paying for it under Medicaid. (Maryland isn't among them.) State Medicaid plans account for two-fifths of all births. Here are the 18 states that don't cover circumcisions and the year they stopped: Colorado 2011 South Carolina 2011 Louisiana 2005 Idaho 2005 Minnesota 2005 Maine 2004 Montana 2003 Utah 2003 Florida 2003 Missouri 2002 Arizona 2002 North Carolina 2002 California before 1999 North Dakota before 1999  Oregon before 1999 Mississippi before 1999 Nevada before 1999 Washington before 1999      
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | June 6, 2011
The best part of a Song of the Summer candidate is just how low the stakes can be. French Montana, a B or C-list New York rapper whose best work can be found on free mixtapes, is an MC with a mush-mouth delivery and an unremarkable persona. Yet here he is, quietly releasing one of the best songs of the year — “Choppa Choppa Down (Remix)” — and watching it finally pick up the momentum it deserves. French can thank his more famous friends for the boost, as Rick Ross (whose Maybach Music Group could be French’s next home)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 2001
HELENA, Mont. - Citing steadily declining jobs in traditional industries such as mining, logging and energy development, Montana is preparing to change its environmental regulations to make them more favorable to business. The efforts are the most ambitious by any state to speed the process of obtaining construction and operating permits, and they have set off an old-fashioned fight between environmentalists and business interests. But both sides agree on one thing: The state's actions have taken on added force and importance in light of President Bush's promise to review the Clinton administration's environmental policies and the willingness of Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton to let the states assume more power to regulate themselves.
SPORTS
By Nick Larson and Nick Larson,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1993
DENVER -- He's 4-for-4 in Super Bowls, but he's 0-for-3 at Mile High Stadium.The legend himself, Joe Montana, can afford to buy almost anything in the world his heart desires with the zillions he has made from the San Francisco 49ers, and now, the Kansas City Chiefs. But no matter what uniform he's wearing, he still can't buy a win in Denver.His Sunday figures in a 27-21 loss to the Broncos -- 17 of 30, 237 yards and two touchdowns -- were decent stats for most pro football quarterbacks. But they weren't good enough to rally the Chiefs, who led 14-3 early, wound up being outscored 17-7 in the final half and fell to 9-4.Denver's rally killed the Chiefs' hopes of their first victory in Denver since 1982.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2009
EPA declares health emergency in Montana towns WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday declared its first-ever "public health emergency," saying the federal government will funnel $6 million to provide medical care for people sickened by asbestos from a mine in a section of northwest Montana. The declaration applies to the towns of Libby and Troy, where for decades workers dug for vermiculite, a mineral used in insulation. They were unknowingly poisoning themselves: The vermiculite was contaminated with a toxic form of asbestos, which workers carried home on their clothes.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 10, 2009
It's probably unfair to ask anyone older than 15 for an opinion of Hannah Montana: The Movie, much less any guy older than 15. If ever a movie was geared toward its target audience, this is that movie. So let's get the definite positives out of the way. Hannah Montana is beautifully shot; cinematographer David Hennings clearly fell in love with Tennessee, where much of the movie was filmed, and you just might, too. The landscape has never looked so good. Also, the film earns its G rating; there's nothing offensive or off-color about it, and a little wholesomeness never hurt anyone.
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