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By DAVE BARRY | December 10, 1995
Well, you young people have gone and done it again.I'm talking about the recent study showing that high-school students, to quote the Associated Press, "do not know basic facts about American history."I hate to be a nag, but this is something like the 46,000th consecutive study showing that you young people are not cutting the academic mustard. Do you know how that makes us older people feel? It makes us feel great. We go around saying to ourselves: "We may be fat and slow and achy and unhip, but at least we know the basic facts about American history."
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By Sherryl Connelly | December 11, 1998
GOOD that it's settled -- Marilyn Monroe is the sexiest woman of the 20th century.Sorry, Madonna, you tried hard and played fair, but the editors of Playboy ranked you a middling 35. Demi Moore, who tried even harder, came in at 66. Farrah Fawcett, 51 and frantic about it, should be reassured at placing 16th. Though it must sting that twitty Jenny McCarthy came in a spot ahead at 15.But few would argue Playboy is wrong in naming Monroe sex star of the century. It's just too bad she's dead.
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NEWS
May 9, 1994
Last time the Marines marched into Haiti, they stayed for 19 years. The U.S. occupation from July 1915 to August 1934 was justified on humanitarian grounds (a mob had butchered the president) and to uphold the Monroe Doctrine (the French presence preceded the American Revolution by more than a century). While the Americans dominated Haiti, politically and financially, they did little to endear themselves to a population that remained mired in poverty. Both countries were relieved to part company.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Davis Fletcher and Stephanie Davis Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1998
On the day I visited Ash Lawn-Highlands, once the plantation home of the fifth president of the United States, my path to the front door was blocked by an iridescent blue peacock that sported a spectacular tail. The bird's opulent color and showy plumage stood out in stark contrast against the simple yellow and white frame house that is located in rolling hills a few miles south of Charlottesville, Va. James and Elizabeth Monroe called the unpretentious place their "cabin castle."Eventually the magnificent fowl slowly and majestically vacated the porch, and I was free to enter the Plain Jane farmhouse.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
Ever since the United States declared its hegemony in the Americas with the Monroe Doctrine in 1823, its policy toward the nations of the Caribbean has lacked two things: consistency and variety.That is only one of its problems.Another, according to many with experience in the region, is that this policy is often built on ignorance."We don't know much about these countries," said Lawrence Pezzullo, President Clinton's former special envoy to Haiti.Mr. Pezzullo explained that because U.S. policy has been so Europe-directed since the end of World War II, "once you get out of the Atlantic corridor the ignorance is profound.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Davis Fletcher and Stephanie Davis Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1998
On the day I visited Ash Lawn-Highlands, once the plantation home of the fifth president of the United States, my path to the front door was blocked by an iridescent blue peacock that sported a spectacular tail. The bird's opulent color and showy plumage stood out in stark contrast against the simple yellow and white frame house that is located in rolling hills a few miles south of Charlottesville, Va. James and Elizabeth Monroe called the unpretentious place their "cabin castle."Eventually the magnificent fowl slowly and majestically vacated the porch, and I was free to enter the Plain Jane farmhouse.
NEWS
By Sherryl Connelly | December 11, 1998
GOOD that it's settled -- Marilyn Monroe is the sexiest woman of the 20th century.Sorry, Madonna, you tried hard and played fair, but the editors of Playboy ranked you a middling 35. Demi Moore, who tried even harder, came in at 66. Farrah Fawcett, 51 and frantic about it, should be reassured at placing 16th. Though it must sting that twitty Jenny McCarthy came in a spot ahead at 15.But few would argue Playboy is wrong in naming Monroe sex star of the century. It's just too bad she's dead.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 12, 1995
"This is my Chappaquiddick," moans William Devane as John Monroe, the head of a new television family that is more than a little loosely based on the Kennedys.The new nighttime soap, which premieres at 10 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2), is in lock step time with the famous Massachusetts family, calling up some of our favorite tabloid headlines of the past, including drug abuse, extramarital affairs and JFK's tango with a woman who turned out to be a spy."The Monroes" is the saga of a wealthy and powerful family living in the Maryland suburbs of Washington.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
UNFORTUNATELY, The Sun's May 8 editorial ("In our own back yard") dredges up the ''yard'' metaphor to refer to the region where President Clinton is discussing a plethora of issues -- drug trafficking, trade and immigration -- of importance to the United States and Latin America.Unlike the media, the president is savvy enough to avoid speaking of Latin America as if it belonged to the United States.From the Monroe Doctrine in 1823 to the present, U.S. leaders have used geographical proximity to argue that Washington is the ''natural protector'' of Latin America.
NEWS
September 11, 1993
TOURISM, state and city officials unceasingly remind us, is big business in the Baltimore area. Now comes a federal commission to remind us that it is big business in the nation as a whole -- indeed, in the entire world.The special federal commission studying the woes of the airline industry, in its tentative report last week,noted that tourism is one of the three top employers in 37 of the 50 states. It employs 8 percent of the population -- not working force, total population.The $382 billion spent on tourism represents 6.4 percent of gross domestic product.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | December 10, 1995
Well, you young people have gone and done it again.I'm talking about the recent study showing that high-school students, to quote the Associated Press, "do not know basic facts about American history."I hate to be a nag, but this is something like the 46,000th consecutive study showing that you young people are not cutting the academic mustard. Do you know how that makes us older people feel? It makes us feel great. We go around saying to ourselves: "We may be fat and slow and achy and unhip, but at least we know the basic facts about American history."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 12, 1995
"This is my Chappaquiddick," moans William Devane as John Monroe, the head of a new television family that is more than a little loosely based on the Kennedys.The new nighttime soap, which premieres at 10 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2), is in lock step time with the famous Massachusetts family, calling up some of our favorite tabloid headlines of the past, including drug abuse, extramarital affairs and JFK's tango with a woman who turned out to be a spy."The Monroes" is the saga of a wealthy and powerful family living in the Maryland suburbs of Washington.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
Ever since the United States declared its hegemony in the Americas with the Monroe Doctrine in 1823, its policy toward the nations of the Caribbean has lacked two things: consistency and variety.That is only one of its problems.Another, according to many with experience in the region, is that this policy is often built on ignorance."We don't know much about these countries," said Lawrence Pezzullo, President Clinton's former special envoy to Haiti.Mr. Pezzullo explained that because U.S. policy has been so Europe-directed since the end of World War II, "once you get out of the Atlantic corridor the ignorance is profound.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
Last time the Marines marched into Haiti, they stayed for 19 years. The U.S. occupation from July 1915 to August 1934 was justified on humanitarian grounds (a mob had butchered the president) and to uphold the Monroe Doctrine (the French presence preceded the American Revolution by more than a century). While the Americans dominated Haiti, politically and financially, they did little to endear themselves to a population that remained mired in poverty. Both countries were relieved to part company.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
Here is a poetic take on the recent robocalls, the "Schurick Doctrine" and the prosecution of Paul Schurick and Julius Henson for their efforts on behalf of Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that I've entitled, "As Schurick and Henson may (or may not) see it. " Schurick, Henson, Henson, Schurick, Can they help it if they knew, Who would win and who would lose? What's the sin in deceiving those most likely to feel ecstasy, That the heavens rained, like confetti, The giddy smell of victory, On the chosen one called O'Malley?
NEWS
March 13, 2013
In a review of the Walters Art Museum show of paintings by 19 t h -century American artist Richard Caton Woodville, reporter Mary McCauley writes that "the real mystery ... is why so little about the painter is known today - even in his hometown" ("Walters explores work of Caton heir who lived fast, died young," March 9). However, the article does little to give readers a greater understanding of the painter or his works. Woodville challenged (and continues to challenge)
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