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NEWS
August 6, 1991
A Franco-Californian company is proposing a 3,700-foot-long monorail to whisk visitors to Harborplace and the new Orioles ballpark at Camden Yards from the stadium's parking lot south of Hamburg Street. The whole trip would take less than 4 minutes and would cost a nominal amount (a quarter), which in this world buys little transportation, except a ride on the Staten Island ferry.This $17 million proposal by VSL Corp., an affiliate of the giant Boyugues Group of France, represents a striking opportunity for Baltimore to achieve a number of things that could make areas around the new baseball stadium more desirable for business and pleasure.
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TRAVEL
By Beverly Beyette and Beverly Beyette,Los Angeles Times | October 7, 2007
LAS VEGAS / / Are there any appealing alternatives to driving the notoriously congested Strip? Let's be creative: How about a mobility scooter? You know, those three-wheel electric numbers. In Las Vegas, they're not just for disabled people. At a maximum speed of 5 mph, they can cruise along the sidewalk -- passing the sweating, blister-footed masses -- into the casinos and right up to the tables or slots. Let's be practical: Walking is always an option, but in summer and early fall, when temperatures soar above 100 degrees, that can be daunting, if not downright deadly.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts | August 2, 1991
Visitors to Baltimore's new Camden Yards ballpark would be able to travel from the stadium to the Inner Harbor in 90 seconds by hopping aboard a futuristic people mover, if the Maryland Stadium Authority accepts a development proposal submitted last month.VSL Corp., a California-based engineering and construction company affiliated with the giant Bouygues Group of France, has offered to finance, build and operate a $17 million, 3,700-foot-long monorail line that would connect Harborplace, the stadium and a 3,000-space stadium parking lot south of Hamburg Street.
NEWS
By Jonathan H. Crawford and Jonathan H. Crawford,Capital News Service | March 9, 2007
The list of ideas for new ways across the Chesapeake Bay sometimes seems as long as one of those weekend traffic jams: a second bridge crossing, a tunnel and even a return of ferry service. Now an lawmaker who represents three Eastern Shore counties thinks he has a solution that should be studied - a monorail. Del. Michael D. Smigiel Sr., a Republican whose district includes Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's and Caroline counties, said the state needs to look at monorail service between Annapolis and Kent Island as a possible way of clearing the region's clogged roads and offering commuters an alternative to the lengthening traffic jams on U.S. 50 and at the Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Jonathan H. Crawford and Jonathan H. Crawford,Capital News Service | March 9, 2007
The list of ideas for new ways across the Chesapeake Bay sometimes seems as long as one of those weekend traffic jams: a second bridge crossing, a tunnel and even a return of ferry service. Now an lawmaker who represents three Eastern Shore counties thinks he has a solution that should be studied - a monorail. Del. Michael D. Smigiel Sr., a Republican whose district includes Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's and Caroline counties, said the state needs to look at monorail service between Annapolis and Kent Island as a possible way of clearing the region's clogged roads and offering commuters an alternative to the lengthening traffic jams on U.S. 50 and at the Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
City leaders are busy courting Congress for funds for a monorail that would run from Camden Station to Canton, even though some residents of Baltimore's historic waterfront neighborhoods are upset about the proposal.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked Congress to spend $1.5 million on a study of his proposed "people mover" -- computerized electrical cars that would run on both sides of a rail elevated about 15 feet and supported by single poles.Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, is spearheading the effort to get congressional approval for the estimated $200 million to build the people mover -- a cost roughly equal to that of the new Ravens stadium.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
LAS VEGAS - This gambling capital is looking to the monorail to ease traffic congestion, hoping it will be the solution that has rarely lived up to Walt Disney's dream for monorails more than 40 years ago. The Las Vegas Monorail began whisking passengers last week along a four-mile, seven-stop stretch that connects some of the city's biggest resorts and convention sites, including the MGM Grand, Bally's, Harrah's, the Las Vegas Hilton and the Las Vegas...
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | January 26, 1997
HERE'S A dirty little secret about personal computers.You don't need a 3-gigabyte disk drive to write a novel. You don't need a 200MHz Pentium processor with MMX technology to balance your checkbook. You don't need a 3-D graphics accelerator to track your stocks and bonds. You don't need a 12X CD-ROM to do your taxes. And you don't need a $300 speaker system with satellite subwoofer to listen to the lady from AOL say, "You've got mail."You do need all these things -- which add up to a couple of grand -- if you want your computer to play games.
FEATURES
By Robert B. Montgomery II and Robert B. Montgomery II,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 27, 1996
It's no fairy tale. Your coach -- or monorail or boat or bus -- will whisk you to the ball -- or theme park -- and it won't turn into a pumpkin at midnight. The ride is convenient, clean and friendly. Talk about a magic kingdom.This transit utopia, of course, is Walt Disney World, where, for 25 years, more than 100 million people have come to find the extraordinary is routine and the fantastic is to be expected."I love this job," says John, the monorail driver. "Everywhere I look I see a picture postcard scene."
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Karen Grey pointed to a thick black line on the map of downtown Columbia covering the table in front of her. The line represented U.S. 29, the busy road that runs between her neighborhood and downtown. It was no match for her green marker. "We need a way to make Town Center accessible to other areas," said Grey, among the hundreds who turned out for the first day of this week's "charrette," intended to hammer out a new blueprint for downtown Columbia. After discussing the problem, the people gathered at her table Sunday agreed that the city needed a monorail.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Karen Grey pointed to a thick black line on the map of downtown Columbia covering the table in front of her. The line represented U.S. 29, the busy road that runs between her neighborhood and downtown. It was no match for her green marker. "We need a way to make Town Center accessible to other areas," said Grey, among the hundreds who turned out for the first day of this week's "charrette," intended to hammer out a new blueprint for downtown Columbia. After discussing the problem, the people gathered at her table Sunday agreed that the city needed a monorail.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
LAS VEGAS - This gambling capital is looking to the monorail to ease traffic congestion, hoping it will be the solution that has rarely lived up to Walt Disney's dream for monorails more than 40 years ago. The Las Vegas Monorail began whisking passengers last week along a four-mile, seven-stop stretch that connects some of the city's biggest resorts and convention sites, including the MGM Grand, Bally's, Harrah's, the Las Vegas Hilton and the Las Vegas...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2002
I ALWAYS asked Wally Orlinsky for a piece of his mind. It was the best thing he had to offer -- smart, informed, outside-the-box thoughts on anything from heroin addiction in Baltimore to the crisis in the Middle East. He was sole inhabitant of a think tank called Wally World. Even as a defrocked public official, he had a keen and fresh grasp of local and national politics and fascinating opinions about everything -- mass transit, municipal water supplies, the news media, police corruption, trees, the Internet, rap music, Japanese art, the Orioles, the Palestinians.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2000
The state officially unveiled plans yesterday for $1.3 billion in improvements to Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and now transportation officials and top-ranking politicians will have to turn their attention to raising the money. Officials acknowledge that little of the money has been secured from state and federal sources, but all expressed confidence that their vision will become reality over the next five years. More than half the money is expected to come from the $3 tax on airline tickets.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Baltimore's "people mover" project -- a proposed three-mile monorail from Camden Station to Canton -- has received preliminary funding from Congress, allowing studies and designs proceed.The authorization is included in $28 million that will be granted directly to the city through the recently passed six-year federal transportation bill. Among the transportation projects authorized are $13.2 million to replace city traffic signals and $10.9 million for road improvements in the city's Empowerment Zone.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
City leaders are busy courting Congress for funds for a monorail that would run from Camden Station to Canton, even though some residents of Baltimore's historic waterfront neighborhoods are upset about the proposal.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked Congress to spend $1.5 million on a study of his proposed "people mover" -- computerized electrical cars that would run on both sides of a rail elevated about 15 feet and supported by single poles.Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, is spearheading the effort to get congressional approval for the estimated $200 million to build the people mover -- a cost roughly equal to that of the new Ravens stadium.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | April 2, 1995
It was part of the original dream that got, well, off track.the early plans for Columbia, visionaries at the Rouse Co. proposed a commuter transportation system that centered on a gleaming monorail that would carry residents from their new homes to the city's downtown.It had a space-age ring to it, perfectly suited to a new town that was itself supposed to be different than anything the country had seen.Alas, it was science fiction.The federal grant sought for the monorail went to West Virginia, and mass transit in Columbia took the more traditional route of a regular bus service -- and an inadequate system at that.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2002
I ALWAYS asked Wally Orlinsky for a piece of his mind. It was the best thing he had to offer -- smart, informed, outside-the-box thoughts on anything from heroin addiction in Baltimore to the crisis in the Middle East. He was sole inhabitant of a think tank called Wally World. Even as a defrocked public official, he had a keen and fresh grasp of local and national politics and fascinating opinions about everything -- mass transit, municipal water supplies, the news media, police corruption, trees, the Internet, rap music, Japanese art, the Orioles, the Palestinians.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | January 26, 1997
HERE'S A dirty little secret about personal computers.You don't need a 3-gigabyte disk drive to write a novel. You don't need a 200MHz Pentium processor with MMX technology to balance your checkbook. You don't need a 3-D graphics accelerator to track your stocks and bonds. You don't need a 12X CD-ROM to do your taxes. And you don't need a $300 speaker system with satellite subwoofer to listen to the lady from AOL say, "You've got mail."You do need all these things -- which add up to a couple of grand -- if you want your computer to play games.
FEATURES
By Robert B. Montgomery II and Robert B. Montgomery II,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 27, 1996
It's no fairy tale. Your coach -- or monorail or boat or bus -- will whisk you to the ball -- or theme park -- and it won't turn into a pumpkin at midnight. The ride is convenient, clean and friendly. Talk about a magic kingdom.This transit utopia, of course, is Walt Disney World, where, for 25 years, more than 100 million people have come to find the extraordinary is routine and the fantastic is to be expected."I love this job," says John, the monorail driver. "Everywhere I look I see a picture postcard scene."
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