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By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | December 31, 1990
WHEN I RAN A NEW program called Monologue on my PC, I knew how the first people who ever used a telephone must have felt."My God, the machine talks!"Actually, people have been making PCs talk for some time. But Monologue didn't just talk. It actually read the word processing document on my screen. It read columns of numbers from a spreadsheet. It even read the DOS prompt.It did all this using the standard PC speaker, a neat trick considering that the original IBM design was aimed at producing beeps and honks, not reproducing human speech.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
One of Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah's bright ideas has evolved into a feature film that will be unveiled worldwide next week. The project began in 2012 when Kwei-Armah was looking for a way to celebrate his theater's 50 t h anniversary. He asked such nationally known playwrights as Christopher Durang, Neil LaBute and the Baltimore-born Anna Deavere Smith to answer the question, "What is my America?" and then turned their responses into three-minute films.
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BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS and PETER McWILLIAMS,1991 Universal Press Syndicate | January 9, 1991
We have only one more decade until we reach Stanley Kubrick's 2001, and we seem a long way from HAL, the recalcitrant computer.Or maybe not.I just received a program called Monologue ($149 list) from a company called First Byte (3100 S. Harbor Blvd., Suite 150, Santa Ana, Calif. 92704; [714] 432-1740), which invests personal computers with the power of speech.Why would you want your computer to talk? The company gives several good reasons. If you work with spreadsheets, you can have Monologue read out to you rows or columns so you can check them against a master list.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Doug Gansler's truly bad day of TV optics started Thursday with a Sun story and accompanying picture off Instagram of a beach party the attorney general attended in Delaware. By 9 a.m., the cable channels were running with the picture and the story -- and it went that way on the hour throughout the day straight through the network evening newscasts and prime-time cable. And then, the story was picked up by late-night comedians. Here's what Jay Leno had to say on the "Tonight" show.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 5, 1994
Spalding Gray has just arrived in Portland, Ore., after four days at a jungle island resort in the Strait of Malacca, where he spent much of his time fending off a large, wrathful monkey.Gray went to the resort to relax after working on a new John Boorman movie called "Beyond," about a 1988 pro-democracy uprising in Burma. But his contretemps with the monkey left him sounding more on edge than usual."I began carrying a big stick," Gray says. "I became like this old character in this place.
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Valerie Lash will have a small, raised platform on which to create a whole world and only herself, a chair, a phone and a book with which to make the scene come alive as she performs The Italian Lesson with Rep Stage over the next three weekends. After an intermission, Deborah Kent will use the same confined space and props to re-create the same slice of life, but she will be singing with the accompaniment of an 11-piece chamber orchestra. The monologue and opera performances of Ruth Draper's one-woman show are part of Rep Stage's The Italian Lesson and Other Divertissements, an "eclectic salon performance" starting tomorrow and running through Feb. 16 at Howard Community College.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1995
Jay Leno wasted no time getting to his favorite subject.No sooner had he bounded onstage at the Lyric Saturday night than he told the ready-to-be-receptive audience, "I want to thank you all for taking time off from watching the O.J. trial."Never mind that the trial was in recess anyway. Mr. Leno has made the Simpson trial a mainstay of his "Tonight Show." He's used it as ceaseless fodder for his monologues, turned the show's "Dancing Itos" into an evening ritual and even invited professional houseguest and media darling Kato Kaelin on for a chat.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 14, 1992
There it sits, smug and hungry, sucking the energy from the room and the joy from your life. It is the half-written book, a pile of crummy, mildewy pages, corpulent with over-ripened language, undeveloped ideas and characters who lay as still and pie-eyed as Lenin under glass. It's the book that doesn't want to be written, much less published, that just sits there like a gallstone in the middle of your life.The half-written book is the "Monster in a Box" that is the center of Spalding Gray's new monologue, as recorded on film by Nick Broomfield and opening today for two days at the Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 27, 2002
You know that she's never unloaded on her husband this way before. After 18 years of being the good wife, mother, homemaker and making the best of it, she hears him tell her there's some other woman, and worse. Who could blame her for snapping? So stand back. Because Rose Maxson will have her moment, finally, much to the astonishment of Troy Maxson, so immersed in his own frustration and pride that you know he hasn't seen it coming. Like most August Wilson dramas, Fences is chiefly a story of men, African-American men. A woman owns a moment in this one, however, that may well be the emotional peak of the play, the current run of which at Everyman Theatre has been extended a week through Feb. 10. Since the show made its debut at the Yale Repertory Theatre in 1985, Rose's page-long monologue in Act Two, Scene One has become a set piece, a standard on the audition circuit, especially for African-American actresses, says Jennifer L. Nelson, who directed the Everyman production.
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Valerie Lash will have a small, raised platform on which to create a whole world and only herself, a chair, a phone and a book with which to make the scene come alive as she performs The Italian Lesson with Rep Stage over the next three weekends. After an intermission, Deborah Kent will use the same confined space and props to re-create the same slice of life, but she will be singing with the accompaniment of an 11-piece chamber orchestra. The monologue and opera performances of Ruth Draper's one-woman show are part of Rep Stage's The Italian Lesson and Other Divertissements, an "eclectic salon performance" starting tomorrow and running through Feb. 16 at Howard Community College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
After Jon Spelman got the bad news, he found himself thinking often and at odd moments about "Moby-Dick. " Perhaps that's because the behemoth that was attacking the Baltimore storyteller was as submerged, unreasoning and unpredictable as any great white whale, and every bit as ferocious. Spelman knew that like Captain Ahab, the anti-hero of Herman Melville's novel, he would have to hunt his hunter. He armed himself not just with doctors and surgery and cancer-fighting drugs, but with wit, bravery and a determination to look straight at his own death - whenever it might come.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Dr. Benjamin Carson, the eminent Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon, has received much attention over the years not only for his skills in the operating room but for what he has achieved beyond it. For many Baltimoreans, his story is a familiar one - born in Detroit, raised in poverty by a single mother, he overcame much to not only become a Medal of Freedom winner but a benefactor to thousands of young people through his scholarship program....
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | April 15, 2007
Westminster Mayor Tom Ferguson said he never imagined he would find himself welcoming to town the author of a play as candid and jarring as The Vagina Monologues. But feminist playwright Eve Ensler, who promotes her work around the world, is coming to Carroll Community College for a local rendition of her play Friday. It's the county's fifth performance of The Vagina Monologues. Activist and organizer Sylviea Tejeda said she has wanted to bring Ensler to Westminster since she watched a captivating performance of the play at Gettysburg College seven years ago. Tejeda said she met Ensler last fall at the opening of an eating disorders clinic at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson.
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By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 2, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Comedy and caring don't mix, so you knew Jay Leno and David Letterman - who are professional rivals but also, at bottom, the same removed, iconoclastic human being - were going to be out of their element paying tribute to Johnny Carson on their respective shows. Still, what was revealing, watching Leno's on-air memorial a week ago and then Letterman's on Monday night (his show was dark last week) was how much the shows betrayed the comics' personal relationships with Carson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo and Elizabeth L. Piccirillo,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
Women across the globe have suffered violence and abuse for centuries, but at least now they have a day. When writer/activist Eve Ensler initiated V-Day in 1998, women jumped at the opportunity to join her campaign to stop the mistreatment of women. The movement stemmed from the success of Ensler's award-winning play The Vagina Monologues, which she originally performed as a one-woman show inspired by interviews with women on love, sex, abuse and, of course, the vagina. The piece is now being performed in nearly 2,000 worldwide V-Day celebrations on or around Valentine's Day to raise funds for local anti-violence groups.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 18, 2004
A group that promotes conservative values at Catholic universities and colleges is targeting several Maryland schools in its nationwide protest against the controversial play The Vagina Monologues. A full-page advertisement in Tuesday's USA Today is headlined: "Scandal! Notre Dame, Georgetown, Boston College, Holy Cross, Loyola, DePaul and 24 more Catholic colleges to host X-rated `play' that glorifies child seduction and other horrors." The advertisement also criticizes by name secular colleges it says are planning productions of the Monologues by Eve Ensler in the next four to six weeks, including the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and University of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Sun staff | April 4, 2002
Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Auditions for 2002 summer season. 7 p.m. Sunday at Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St.; 7 p.m. Monday at Vagabond Players, 806 S. Broadway; 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. Needed are male and female actors of varying ages and ethnicities. Prepare a two-minute monologue; resume and photo requested. Seven theaters will produce 10-12 plays by Maryland playwrights this season. Call 410-276-2135. Dinari Theater Project.
FEATURES
March 27, 2003
Asylum Productions. Community theater in residence at CCBC Catonsville will hold auditions for William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew at 7 p.m. April 6 and April 8 in the Q Theatre Building Lounge, 800 South Rolling Road. Auditioners should prepare a two-minute classical comic monologue and be prepared to read from the script. The role of Petruchio has been cast. All others are open, including 6-12 ensemble positions, out of which all minor roles will be cast. Information: Call Joseph Durika at 443-956-6742 or e-mail asylumstage@hotmail.
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