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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Do Baltimore police have a problem with driving? It might depend on which officer you ask. Last week's column dealt with two recent auto fatalities involving city officers within a short period of time this fall. The point was that these single-moving-vehicle crashes, in which it appears the officer was at fault, raise questions about the culture, training and management of the Baltimore force. The column wasn't expected to please everybody, and it didn't. But just as interesting as the response was the non-response: Not a peep was heard from the Baltimore Police Department or Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. Two former cops were not as reticent.
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By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
“What do you do around here, Don?” That's the question on everyone's mind, even Don's. Four weeks into his whimper of a return to SC&P, he remains in career limbo, cooped up in a mausoleum of an office his without so much as an ad campaign to his name. Relapse was inevitable, which means repetition was unavoidable. In last week's episode, "Field Trip," we saw Don swallow his pride and accept his old job on SC&P's conditions, not his. It was a new leaf for the entitled and narcissistic anti-hero we love to hate.
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FEATURES
By Charles Leroux and Charles Leroux,Chicago Tribune | May 1, 2007
Cherry Jones is either a disarming, self-effacing woman with an easy smile and a warm, down-home charm, or she's a dark and fearsome dreadnought, a monolith of cold, congealed, righteous wrath. The difference lies in whether she's herself, the 50-year-old, two-time Tony award-winning actress from Paris, Tenn., or Sister Aloysius, principal of a Catholic school in the Bronx, N.Y., in 1964 in John Patrick Shanley's Pulitzer-winning play, Doubt, which opens tonight at the Hippodrome. Doubt runs through May 13 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
On Thursday, Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to sign into law a 3 percent sales tax on alcohol, Maryland's first increase in alcohol-specific taxes since 1972 (and the first on hard liquor since the Eisenhower administration). The alcohol industry has warned the state's drinkers of this impending increase with something of a doomsday air; liquor wholesalers and retailers spent the 90-day legislative session telling consumers that the "dime a drink" proposal being considered would really amount to much more, and the last-minute switch from an excise tax to a sales tax has done little to change their tune.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 1, 2004
A Memorable Place Pondering life amid Oslo sculptures By Marge Stickevers SPECIAL TO THE SUN Of all the sights I saw in Scandinavia, the Monolith at Gustav Vigeland's Sculpture Park in Oslo, Norway, most intrigued me. From a single block of granite more than 46 feet high, human figures rise in a spiral. It took three stone carvers from 1929 to 1943, working daily, to finish the sculpture, just before Vigeland, the artist who designed it, died. The Monolith is the culmination of monuments that Vigeland created and dedicated to the life cycle of man. Vigeland negotiated an agreement with Oslo to display his work, which he donated to the city.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 7, 1994
The "big event" tonight is that Zack and Kelly are getting married in a new prime-time telemovie version of "Saved By the Bell." That being the case, stick with smaller but undoubtedly more enriching events: a Bill Moyers discussion on PBS, or episodes of "The X-Files" and "Picket Fences" on Fox and CBS, respectively.* "Saved By the Bell -- Wedding in Las Vegas" (8-10 p.m., Channel 2) -- My kids watch this show so religiously in reruns that it's become my personal cathode-ray equivalent of kryptonite: The merest of exposure to this show makes me a little green around the edges.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
That does it. It's time to come out, whoever you are -- you who keeps leaving cryptic, taunting markers on our Baltimore intersections.A new Toynbee Idea in Movie 2001 Resurrect Dead on Planet Jupiter street marker has appeared. You've seen the old ones -- heck, you walk over them every day. The white stenciled messages, clandestinely applied by some guerrilla artist, no doubt, have baffled the locals for years. No one seems to know when they first appeared. And no one knows exactly what the message means.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 3, 1993
There are few names in the history of photography that conjure up such instant images as that of Ansel Adams. His photographs of the West have given us a vision of the magnificence of the American landscape that even the real thing must have a hard time living up to.Fewer know the diversity of Adams' work, especially early in his career, but now we have "Ansel Adams: The Early Years," which opened at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday. Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the show contains about 75 images tracing Adams' career from "Wind" of about 1919 (when he was only 17)
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 7, 1992
Word out of Penn State this week is that folks on campus -- and just about everyone in the small towns between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh -- are going bonkers over the big football game at the Happy Valley monolith (Beaver Stadium) Saturday. But you couldn't tell it by Nittany Lions coach Joe Paterno."To tell you the truth, I don't know anything about the frenzy," says Paterno. "I'm bleary-eyed watching tapes of Miami's last two games. I haven't been downtown, out in public or talked to anyone.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | March 22, 1995
Washington. -- Just as Republicans are trying to hold together their economic and religious wings through the 1996 elections, there appears to be severe turbulence on the religious side.At a conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, last weekend called ''Reclaiming America for Christ,'' Republican State Sen. Tim Philpot of Kentucky told the 700 in attendance there is a danger of ''selfishness'' if it appears ''we care only for ourselves.''In a conversation with me, Mr. Philpot said Republicans are making a mistake by speaking only of tax cuts and saying nothing about the poor and helpless.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Do Baltimore police have a problem with driving? It might depend on which officer you ask. Last week's column dealt with two recent auto fatalities involving city officers within a short period of time this fall. The point was that these single-moving-vehicle crashes, in which it appears the officer was at fault, raise questions about the culture, training and management of the Baltimore force. The column wasn't expected to please everybody, and it didn't. But just as interesting as the response was the non-response: Not a peep was heard from the Baltimore Police Department or Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. Two former cops were not as reticent.
FEATURES
By Charles Leroux and Charles Leroux,Chicago Tribune | May 1, 2007
Cherry Jones is either a disarming, self-effacing woman with an easy smile and a warm, down-home charm, or she's a dark and fearsome dreadnought, a monolith of cold, congealed, righteous wrath. The difference lies in whether she's herself, the 50-year-old, two-time Tony award-winning actress from Paris, Tenn., or Sister Aloysius, principal of a Catholic school in the Bronx, N.Y., in 1964 in John Patrick Shanley's Pulitzer-winning play, Doubt, which opens tonight at the Hippodrome. Doubt runs through May 13 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 1, 2004
A Memorable Place Pondering life amid Oslo sculptures By Marge Stickevers SPECIAL TO THE SUN Of all the sights I saw in Scandinavia, the Monolith at Gustav Vigeland's Sculpture Park in Oslo, Norway, most intrigued me. From a single block of granite more than 46 feet high, human figures rise in a spiral. It took three stone carvers from 1929 to 1943, working daily, to finish the sculpture, just before Vigeland, the artist who designed it, died. The Monolith is the culmination of monuments that Vigeland created and dedicated to the life cycle of man. Vigeland negotiated an agreement with Oslo to display his work, which he donated to the city.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
MYRON ORFIELD is the new guru of regional approaches to the issues of growth and decline facing cities and their suburbs. Some of the answers he offers - tax-base sharing and strong regional land-use planning - seem largely futuristic, but he certainly makes a convincing presentation about the need to address the problems. That was apparent at a talk he gave last week in Washington to launch a tour for his new book, American Metropolitics: The New Suburban Reality, published by Brookings Institution Press.
NEWS
January 4, 2001
IT'S USUALLY conservatives who preach against quotas in the name of diversity, who say racial, ethnic and gender diversity shouldn't count as much as a variety of thoughts and opinions. Yet look at George W. Bush's Cabinet. On the surface, Mr. Bush will have the most diverse senior staff in history -- four women, two black men, two Hispanics, an Asian-American and an Arab-American. But beneath that rich chord of ethnicity and gender lies a conservative political monotone. Few of Mr. Bush's nominees come from the GOP's center.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
That does it. It's time to come out, whoever you are -- you who keeps leaving cryptic, taunting markers on our Baltimore intersections.A new Toynbee Idea in Movie 2001 Resurrect Dead on Planet Jupiter street marker has appeared. You've seen the old ones -- heck, you walk over them every day. The white stenciled messages, clandestinely applied by some guerrilla artist, no doubt, have baffled the locals for years. No one seems to know when they first appeared. And no one knows exactly what the message means.
NEWS
By Norrie Epstein | December 15, 1991
FROG.Stephen Dixon.British-American Publishing.769 pages.$29.95; $17.95 (paperback). That "Frog" should be so moving came as a surprise. It promised to be a "literary tour de force," one of those formidable books that critics admire, everybody talks about, but few enjoy.It's more than 750 pages; author Stephen Dixon, a professor of fiction in the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, was nominated for the prestigious National Book Award; Publishers Weekly called it a "Joycean monolith" (meaning that it probably didn't know what else to say)
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
MYRON ORFIELD is the new guru of regional approaches to the issues of growth and decline facing cities and their suburbs. Some of the answers he offers - tax-base sharing and strong regional land-use planning - seem largely futuristic, but he certainly makes a convincing presentation about the need to address the problems. That was apparent at a talk he gave last week in Washington to launch a tour for his new book, American Metropolitics: The New Suburban Reality, published by Brookings Institution Press.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
One of science fiction's brightest lights, Arthur C. Clarke, gets profiled on the Sci-Fi Channel tonight."Home Improvement" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m. and 9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- "Roseanne" gets pre-empted again (guess they're saving everything for next month's grand finale) in favor of a pair of Tim Allen repeats. In the first (from January), Drew Carey plays an animal control expert and last-minute guest on "Tool Time." In the second (from February), Janeane Garofalo and Anne Francis are among the Valentine's episode guests, as Tim is contacted by an old flame of his late father.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 4, 1995
Washington -- You read some polls and listen to some pundits and surely get the impression that the O.J. Simpson trial will be the catalyst for the next American civil war.Everywhere I look someone is writing or talking about how this case divides black and white Americans more than anything -- yes, even affirmative action or the death penalty or welfare reform.We are told that blacks stand with the black defendant, O.J., while whites want him to fry.This is pollsters' hogwash. Their constant harping on differences in racial attitudes creates the potential for stupid racial strife.
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