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Monocacy National Battlefield

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By Lori Sears | July 8, 1999
Civil War eventCelebrate the 135th anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy this weekend in Frederick. Tomorrow, listen to a panel discuss the significance of the battle at 7:30 p.m. in Winchester Hall on East Church Street. Saturday, listen to an interpretive program on the American brass band movement with the Wildcat Regiment Band at 2 p.m. Both Saturday and Sunday, tour the Monocacy National Battlefield with Dr. Benjamin Franklin Cooling -- at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday and at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Sunday.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"Monocacy" is an Americanized version of the Shawnee word "Monnockkesy," which means "river of many bends," and the Monocacy River lives up to its name. Though my kayak glides calmly under my kayak through the opaque green water, I struggle to keep up with my guide, Andy Lett, recreation supervisor for the Frederick County Department of Parks and Recreation. Whenever I get the hang of things, dipping one oar and then another to propel myself in a relatively straight line, another curve arrives to confuse me, and I have to stop to change direction so I don't paddle right into the riverbank.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
A proposed trash incinerator and a planned natural gas plant threaten to encroach on two Civil War battlefield sites in Western Maryland, a preservation group warned yesterday. The Washington-based Civil War Preservation Trust said recent developments have put the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick and South Mountain near Middletown on its list of the nation's most endangered battlefields from that war. "In town after town, the irreplaceable battlefields that define those communities are being marred forever," said O. James Lighthizer, the trust's president.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Standing behind the old brick Worthington House, visitors can look down the gently sloping hillside and picture the Civil War battle that likely saved the nation's capital from capture. Much of the farmland where Union soldiers fought that hot summer day in 1864 to delay a Confederate attack on Washington has been preserved as Monocacy National Battlefield. But the view from the Worthington farm, where the fighting began, appears fated to become less historic. A huge waste-to-energy plant is planned just across the Monocacy River from the 1,650-acre park — a project that has sparked criticism as the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the war. One hundred fifty feet tall, with a 270-foot smokestack, the facility will loom over the trees that hide areas where Confederate cavalry forded the river to assault Union infantry.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 1998
IT DID not have the drama of Gettysburg or Antietam. Nevertheless, the battle of Monocacy on July 9, 1864, was one of the most important battles of the Civil War.On the wheat and corn fields outside Frederick, Confederate forces led by Gen. Jubal Early defeated Union forces under Gen. Lew Wallace (author of the novel, "Ben Hur").Although it was a Confederate victory, the battle cost Early a day's march -- and his chance to capture Washington.As a result, the Confederates turned back to Virginia, a move that ended their attempt to carry the war into the North.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
The Battle of Monocacy on the Monocacy River near Frederick in July 1864 played an important role in the Union's victory in the Civil War. Confederate Gen. Jubal Early was leading his troops to attack Washington when they became locked in a battle with Union soldiers led by Gen. Lew Wallace, delaying their advance. That delay, and poor Confederate communications, gave Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant time to reinforce troops in Washington. Those events 137 years ago were recounted this week by Gloria Baker, a National Park Service ranger at the Monocacy National Battlefield.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
The National Park Service is marking Black History Month with an exhibit on a 200-year-old "slave village" that archaeologists found at the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick. The temporary exhibit opened Monday at the park visitor center and will be up through the end of the month. Spokeswoman Tracy Shives says the exhibit uses written materials and artifacts such as buttons and pottery pieces to explain how the community of up to 90 slaves was uncovered and how they lived. - Associated Press div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; }
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"Monocacy" is an Americanized version of the Shawnee word "Monnockkesy," which means "river of many bends," and the Monocacy River lives up to its name. Though my kayak glides calmly under my kayak through the opaque green water, I struggle to keep up with my guide, Andy Lett, recreation supervisor for the Frederick County Department of Parks and Recreation. Whenever I get the hang of things, dipping one oar and then another to propel myself in a relatively straight line, another curve arrives to confuse me, and I have to stop to change direction so I don't paddle right into the riverbank.
NEWS
March 15, 2008
Walking the peaceful paths of the Antietam battlefield invites thoughtful reflection on the history that marks this place among America's iconic landmarks as significant as Valley Forge or Fort McHenry. Antietam was the bloodiest one-day battle in the bloodiest war in American history, with an estimated 23,000 casualties. It set the stage for Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. It's painful to imagine looking up from this landscape filled with history's ghosts and seeing a 120-foot telecommunications tower looming on the horizon.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
While the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, the first blood spilled in fighting occurred in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, when a mob of Southern sympathizers clashed with Massachusetts soldiers who'd debarked from a train on their way to Washington. Eight rioters, one bystander and three soldiers were killed, while dozens were wounded. Situated as it was on the border between North and South, Maryland is home to Civil War sites large and small, from the sweeping landscape of the Antietam Battlefield National Park in Sharpsburg, where 23,000 men were killed, wounded or went missing in the bloodiest single day in US history, to the Surratt House Museum in the outskirts of Washington, where the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and other top government officials was hatched.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
While the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, the first blood spilled in fighting occurred in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, when a mob of Southern sympathizers clashed with Massachusetts soldiers who'd debarked from a train on their way to Washington. Eight rioters, one bystander and three soldiers were killed, while dozens were wounded. Situated as it was on the border between North and South, Maryland is home to Civil War sites large and small, from the sweeping landscape of the Antietam Battlefield National Park in Sharpsburg, where 23,000 men were killed, wounded or went missing in the bloodiest single day in US history, to the Surratt House Museum in the outskirts of Washington, where the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and other top government officials was hatched.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
The National Park Service is marking Black History Month with an exhibit on a 200-year-old "slave village" that archaeologists found at the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick. The temporary exhibit opened Monday at the park visitor center and will be up through the end of the month. Spokeswoman Tracy Shives says the exhibit uses written materials and artifacts such as buttons and pottery pieces to explain how the community of up to 90 slaves was uncovered and how they lived. - Associated Press div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; }
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
A proposed trash incinerator and a planned natural gas plant threaten to encroach on two Civil War battlefield sites in Western Maryland, a preservation group warned yesterday. The Washington-based Civil War Preservation Trust said recent developments have put the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick and South Mountain near Middletown on its list of the nation's most endangered battlefields from that war. "In town after town, the irreplaceable battlefields that define those communities are being marred forever," said O. James Lighthizer, the trust's president.
NEWS
March 15, 2008
Walking the peaceful paths of the Antietam battlefield invites thoughtful reflection on the history that marks this place among America's iconic landmarks as significant as Valley Forge or Fort McHenry. Antietam was the bloodiest one-day battle in the bloodiest war in American history, with an estimated 23,000 casualties. It set the stage for Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. It's painful to imagine looking up from this landscape filled with history's ghosts and seeing a 120-foot telecommunications tower looming on the horizon.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
The Battle of Monocacy on the Monocacy River near Frederick in July 1864 played an important role in the Union's victory in the Civil War. Confederate Gen. Jubal Early was leading his troops to attack Washington when they became locked in a battle with Union soldiers led by Gen. Lew Wallace, delaying their advance. That delay, and poor Confederate communications, gave Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant time to reinforce troops in Washington. Those events 137 years ago were recounted this week by Gloria Baker, a National Park Service ranger at the Monocacy National Battlefield.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | July 8, 1999
Civil War eventCelebrate the 135th anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy this weekend in Frederick. Tomorrow, listen to a panel discuss the significance of the battle at 7:30 p.m. in Winchester Hall on East Church Street. Saturday, listen to an interpretive program on the American brass band movement with the Wildcat Regiment Band at 2 p.m. Both Saturday and Sunday, tour the Monocacy National Battlefield with Dr. Benjamin Franklin Cooling -- at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday and at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1994
FREDERICK -- In the spring, blooming Virginia blue-bells and other wildflowers lure Larry Marsh away from his desk to the tree-lined banks of the slow-moving Monocacy River.The draw of the Monocacy is more than just wildflowers, though, even in spring, Mr. Marsh says. It's also the occasional glimpse of a great-blue heron wading through shallow water, or painted and snapping turtles swimming by that deepen Mr. Marsh's appreciation for this scenic waterway.The Monocacy and its banks constitute a haven Mr. Marsh would like to share with others.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Standing behind the old brick Worthington House, visitors can look down the gently sloping hillside and picture the Civil War battle that likely saved the nation's capital from capture. Much of the farmland where Union soldiers fought that hot summer day in 1864 to delay a Confederate attack on Washington has been preserved as Monocacy National Battlefield. But the view from the Worthington farm, where the fighting began, appears fated to become less historic. A huge waste-to-energy plant is planned just across the Monocacy River from the 1,650-acre park — a project that has sparked criticism as the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the war. One hundred fifty feet tall, with a 270-foot smokestack, the facility will loom over the trees that hide areas where Confederate cavalry forded the river to assault Union infantry.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 1998
IT DID not have the drama of Gettysburg or Antietam. Nevertheless, the battle of Monocacy on July 9, 1864, was one of the most important battles of the Civil War.On the wheat and corn fields outside Frederick, Confederate forces led by Gen. Jubal Early defeated Union forces under Gen. Lew Wallace (author of the novel, "Ben Hur").Although it was a Confederate victory, the battle cost Early a day's march -- and his chance to capture Washington.As a result, the Confederates turned back to Virginia, a move that ended their attempt to carry the war into the North.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1994
FREDERICK -- In the spring, blooming Virginia blue-bells and other wildflowers lure Larry Marsh away from his desk to the tree-lined banks of the slow-moving Monocacy River.The draw of the Monocacy is more than just wildflowers, though, even in spring, Mr. Marsh says. It's also the occasional glimpse of a great-blue heron wading through shallow water, or painted and snapping turtles swimming by that deepen Mr. Marsh's appreciation for this scenic waterway.The Monocacy and its banks constitute a haven Mr. Marsh would like to share with others.
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