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Monkfish

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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 17, 2006
It may be the ugliest fish in the ocean, but, man, is it tasty. I am talking about monkfish, Lophius americanus, the bottom dweller that has an enormous head, serious teeth and a face only a mother monk- fish could love. Sitting on the bottom of the ocean, the monkfish dangles its modified spine, or "esca" in front of its mouth to attract prey. When a passing fish takes this "bait," the monkfish, also known as the anglerfish, swallows the fish. Monkfish have been reported to eat prey half their size, according to a fact sheet produced by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and also have been known to venture up to the surface and chow down on water birds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
Nobu West By Nobu Matsuhisa and Mark Edwards Japanese Light By Kimiko Barber DK Publishing / 2007 / $25 You can tell Kimiko Barber is a seasoned cooking teacher: This more approachable book is loaded with step-by-step photos, tips and primers on etiquette, menus and presenting a Japanese meal. Cooks who are just venturing into Japanese cuisine will find plenty of doable recipes and answers to many questions. There are also Western influences here. Bacon, for example, shows up as an accent for fava beans, in a pot-au-feu, and in a quick, delicious "sobaghetti" with soba noodles and greens.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 27, 2007
Buying seafood used to be simple. You made sure the eyes of a whole fish were clear, its gills bright red, its smell virtually nonexistent. But now concerns about our health and the environment have made buying fresh seafood complex and confusing. Not only do you have to figure out what is in the fish and what it will do for you; you also are expected to know what catching the fish does to the environment. Recently, I navigated my way through a number of seafood-buying guides and databases.
NEWS
By Beverly Levitt and Beverly Levitt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2002
Mostly Martha, the new German film, which opens Friday at the Charles Theatre, centers on a Hamburg chef (portrayed by Martina Gedeck) who produces exquisite French dishes while enduring an emotional life as pale as her kitchen whites. People leave her cold, and she takes little pleasure in food. When a charming Italian sous-chef named Mario (Sergio Castellitto) tries to wine and dine her, this young woman's fancy doesn't turn to love; she's sure he's come to steal her job. "I've always been fascinated by chefs," says writer-director Sandra Nettelbeck.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 27, 2007
Buying seafood used to be simple. You made sure the eyes of a whole fish were clear, its gills bright red, its smell virtually nonexistent. But now concerns about our health and the environment have made buying fresh seafood complex and confusing. Not only do you have to figure out what is in the fish and what it will do for you; you also are expected to know what catching the fish does to the environment. Recently, I navigated my way through a number of seafood-buying guides and databases.
NEWS
October 10, 2000
ONCE DESPISED as a pest and trash species, the spiny dogfish has quickly achieved endangered status. Maryland and other coastal states are moving to ban the harvest of the small shark for at least six months, responding to emergency action by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and the federal government. East Coast counts of the three-footed creature with venomous spines have plummeted over the past decade, a result of intense commercial fishing, primarily to serve a voracious British appetite for fish and chips.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 5, 1996
The wonders of watermelonWhat item of produce originated in the Kalahari Desert, was grown by Thomas Jefferson and was said by Mark Twain to be "king over all fruits?" If you guessed watermelon, you're probably one of the people the USDA estimates will eat 16 pounds of it this year. For a free brochure with tips on buying watermelons, and recipes such as Mediterranean watermelon (above), call (800) 55-MELON.Charitable chefsDon't feel like cooking tonight? How about sampling dishes by chefs from the Classic Catering People, plus local chefs Jennifer Price, Nancy Longo and Billy Himmelrich?
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Sisson's The Sun Picolo Italiano Ristorante The Sunday Sun | November 16, 1991
TorremolinosTorremolinos Restaurant, 8 E. Preston St., (410) 752-5227. This long-time Spanish restaurant closed for a month last summer "for renovations." I was a little worried -- we all know plenty of restaurants that never return from alleged renovation. But not Torremolinos. Right on schedule, it came back, with a new paint job and rejuvenated service. The food even tasted better than on an earlier visit. The Tornedos Torremolinos ($16.50) and Ternera Castellana ($13.95), veal in a lemon-butter sauce, were both tender, beautifully sauced and full of flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
Nobu West By Nobu Matsuhisa and Mark Edwards Japanese Light By Kimiko Barber DK Publishing / 2007 / $25 You can tell Kimiko Barber is a seasoned cooking teacher: This more approachable book is loaded with step-by-step photos, tips and primers on etiquette, menus and presenting a Japanese meal. Cooks who are just venturing into Japanese cuisine will find plenty of doable recipes and answers to many questions. There are also Western influences here. Bacon, for example, shows up as an accent for fava beans, in a pot-au-feu, and in a quick, delicious "sobaghetti" with soba noodles and greens.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 17, 2006
It may be the ugliest fish in the ocean, but, man, is it tasty. I am talking about monkfish, Lophius americanus, the bottom dweller that has an enormous head, serious teeth and a face only a mother monk- fish could love. Sitting on the bottom of the ocean, the monkfish dangles its modified spine, or "esca" in front of its mouth to attract prey. When a passing fish takes this "bait," the monkfish, also known as the anglerfish, swallows the fish. Monkfish have been reported to eat prey half their size, according to a fact sheet produced by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and also have been known to venture up to the surface and chow down on water birds.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 12, 2006
It seemed foolish to make reservations for 6 p.m. on a weeknight at a Patterson Park restaurant few Baltimoreans had heard of, but we did it anyway. And yes, the Parkside had our reservation. The hostess just hadn't done anything about it. The staff had combined tables in the dining room for a large party and then seated couples at random tables, so there was no room for a party of four. In the bar area in front, most of the tables were pushed together and reserved for another large party.
NEWS
By Beverly Levitt and Beverly Levitt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2002
Mostly Martha, the new German film, which opens Friday at the Charles Theatre, centers on a Hamburg chef (portrayed by Martina Gedeck) who produces exquisite French dishes while enduring an emotional life as pale as her kitchen whites. People leave her cold, and she takes little pleasure in food. When a charming Italian sous-chef named Mario (Sergio Castellitto) tries to wine and dine her, this young woman's fancy doesn't turn to love; she's sure he's come to steal her job. "I've always been fascinated by chefs," says writer-director Sandra Nettelbeck.
NEWS
October 10, 2000
ONCE DESPISED as a pest and trash species, the spiny dogfish has quickly achieved endangered status. Maryland and other coastal states are moving to ban the harvest of the small shark for at least six months, responding to emergency action by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and the federal government. East Coast counts of the three-footed creature with venomous spines have plummeted over the past decade, a result of intense commercial fishing, primarily to serve a voracious British appetite for fish and chips.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 5, 1996
The wonders of watermelonWhat item of produce originated in the Kalahari Desert, was grown by Thomas Jefferson and was said by Mark Twain to be "king over all fruits?" If you guessed watermelon, you're probably one of the people the USDA estimates will eat 16 pounds of it this year. For a free brochure with tips on buying watermelons, and recipes such as Mediterranean watermelon (above), call (800) 55-MELON.Charitable chefsDon't feel like cooking tonight? How about sampling dishes by chefs from the Classic Catering People, plus local chefs Jennifer Price, Nancy Longo and Billy Himmelrich?
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 12, 2006
It seemed foolish to make reservations for 6 p.m. on a weeknight at a Patterson Park restaurant few Baltimoreans had heard of, but we did it anyway. And yes, the Parkside had our reservation. The hostess just hadn't done anything about it. The staff had combined tables in the dining room for a large party and then seated couples at random tables, so there was no room for a party of four. In the bar area in front, most of the tables were pushed together and reserved for another large party.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 6, 1992
Boccaccio, 925 Eastern Ave., (410) 234-1322. Open Mondays to Fridays for lunch and dinner, Saturdays and Sundays dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair access: no.Three years ago Giovanni Rigato sold his successful restaurant Capriccio and semi-retired to Italy. He did open a little place for a season there, but it was never meant to be a long-term operation."I missed Baltimore," he says now. "I missed the action." So Mr. Rigato has returned to Baltimore -- and to Little Italy -- to open a new restaurant, Boccaccio.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 6, 1992
Boccaccio, 925 Eastern Ave., (410) 234-1322. Open Mondays to Fridays for lunch and dinner, Saturdays and Sundays dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair access: no.Three years ago Giovanni Rigato sold his successful restaurant Capriccio and semi-retired to Italy. He did open a little place for a season there, but it was never meant to be a long-term operation."I missed Baltimore," he says now. "I missed the action." So Mr. Rigato has returned to Baltimore -- and to Little Italy -- to open a new restaurant, Boccaccio.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Sisson's The Sun Picolo Italiano Ristorante The Sunday Sun | November 16, 1991
TorremolinosTorremolinos Restaurant, 8 E. Preston St., (410) 752-5227. This long-time Spanish restaurant closed for a month last summer "for renovations." I was a little worried -- we all know plenty of restaurants that never return from alleged renovation. But not Torremolinos. Right on schedule, it came back, with a new paint job and rejuvenated service. The food even tasted better than on an earlier visit. The Tornedos Torremolinos ($16.50) and Ternera Castellana ($13.95), veal in a lemon-butter sauce, were both tender, beautifully sauced and full of flavor.
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