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NEWS
September 28, 2011
The use of monkeys at Aberdeen Proving Ground in a training session amounts to institutionalized torture ("APG shouldn't needlessly harm monkeys," Sept. 27). In their recent opinion article, physicians Barbara and Martin Wasserman pointed out the reasons why monkeys are particularly inappropriate in chemical casualty training. These monkeys are the tip of the iceberg. Sadly, it is not just monkeys. There are around 500 chimpanzees left over from the space program that are being warehoused by the U.S. Air Force.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The Firefly Music Festival is not for everyone, especially for those that find much of the following unappealing: Multiple days of camping, ironic tank-tops, drinking games, Grateful Dead tapestries, dust, drug dealers, bugs, hydration packs, portable toilets, 30-minute treks from camp to the festival grounds, high-waisted shorts, flying glow sticks and bad tanlines. For the rest of us - and there were approximately 80,000 music fans in attendance, according to Billboard - the four-day music festival that took place from Thursday to Sunday in Dover, Del., was an unofficial kickoff to summer celebration that was thrilling and - if we're being honest - draining.
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NEWS
By Barbara Wasserman and Martin Wasserman | September 26, 2011
The monkey in the video spasms violently. He's just been injected with a massive dose of physostigmine — more than 30 times the maximum limit recommended by the Food and Drug Administration — causing vomiting, breathing difficulty, seizures and even death. The video in question was obtained from the United States Army through the Freedom of Information Act by the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. It's a military chemical casualty training video, and it depicts what will happen in an upcoming course at Aberdeen Proving Ground here in Maryland.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | January 9, 2014
“If you have the time,” Dr. Majid Fotuhi said to me, “I'll give you a little test.” We were in an office in the neurologist's Lutherville brain center, and he'd just finished explaining to me how the short-term memory portion of your brain shrinks about .5 percent every year after you turn 50. The test he had in mind was for me to try to memorize 20 random words so well that I could recite them forward and backward. When he explained that everyone he's guided through the test has been able to do it, my 60-plus-year-old brain, well-shrunk but still attuned to the risk of embarrassment, began searching for excuses to beg off. It failed, of course.
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | February 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the bitter strife between mainstream science and animal-rights advocates, the scientists have made a strong case for experimenting on animals to advance human welfare. In fact, anyone who disputes them is likely to be relegated to the nut fringe.But you don't have to be an animal-rights zealot to wonder about NASA sinking 31 million scarce government dollars into an international study of how monkeys with electrodes in their brains and wires in their bodies react to a two-week space voyage.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Animal-rights activists got new hope yesterday that the Supreme Court may help them in a yearslong effort to protect the "Silver Spring monkeys" -- animals used in government-funded research that left them maimed.The monkeys -- 17 at the beginning, now down to nine after the others died or were put to death in a further experiment -- have been at the center of a continuing controversy between sympathizers and the government's National Institutes of Health, based in Bethesda.
NEWS
By James Drew and Josh Mitchell | February 10, 2008
Eight monkeys were shaken up, and one seriously injured, in an accident early yesterday along Interstate 95 in Harford County. The monkeys were being held two to a cage in a trailer behind a van when the collision occurred about 4:35 a.m., authorities said. The van and trailer flipped when the northbound driver, trying to change lanes, swerved and collided with another vehicle, said Trooper Mike Smart of the Maryland State Police. The drivers of the van and the other vehicle were uninjured.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary can stay in Woodstock but its monkeys must be out in four years, a Howard County panel has decided. The vote -- which pleased neither Frisky's longtime manager nor the next-door neighbors opposed to the primates -- came after 27 months of hearings to decide the fate of the private shelter, which was operating without land-use approval. "I'm devastated, I'm totally devastated," said Colleen Layton, who runs the sanctuary from her 3.7-acre home. "Phasing us out, I could have handled, where you get no more, or `you have so many years to do something about the macaque monkeys' -- but all of them?"
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 31, 1991
KEY LOIS, Fla. -- The once-lush shoreline of this tiny island is an eerie tangle of dead, gnarled wood. The clear blue water is fouled a muddy brown. Well-fed monkeys roam along the barren beach, past a row of red mangrove trees.It is the trees, not the monkeys, that are in cages.For deep in the Florida Keys, monkey business has given way to munching mayhem.Here, on a key of 100 acres, more than 1,500 rhesus monkeys romp and scurry and swing and chase and scream. Under the tropical sun, they hang from branches, stroll down a boarded walkway, scout the waterfront, fight, play, dally and, perhaps most notably, dine.
NEWS
By Sk. Azizur Rahman and Sk. Azizur Rahman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2000
CALCUTTA, India -- On India's streets, parks and tourist spots, countless people earn their bread by entertaining passers-by with monkeys. But a blacksmith in the eastern state of Orissa has given new meaning to the phrase "monkey business." Kalicharan Maharana employs two rhesus monkeys at his workshop to run the bellows of his charcoal oven. Animal lovers are outraged, and labor officials are dumbfounded, but Maharana doesn't understand what the fuss is about. Cows, elephants and other animals earn their keep, he points out. He befriended the monkeys when they came to his shop for food every day. "One day it struck me that, properly trained, they could probably do some jobs just like the average [human]
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | January 8, 2014
"As soon as A observes something which seems to him to be wrong, from which X is suffering, A talks it over with B, and A and B then propose to get a law passed to remedy the evil and help X. Their law always proposes to determine what C shall do for X, or the better case, what A, B and C shall do for X. … What I want to do is to look up C. I want to show you what manner of man he is. I call him the Forgotten Man. Perhaps the appellation is not...
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Samson, the young male elephant who was diagnosed with a deadly virus at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore late last month, has continued to recover in recent days and has "turned a very positive corner" in his treatment, according to zoo officials. "His energy levels are very close to normal again, he's much brighter and a lot of his symptoms have either gone away or are nearly gone," Michael McClure, general curator for the zoo's animal department, said Thursday. McClure said he and his staff have been nursing Samson back to health around the clock for nearly four weeks and are encouraged by his recovery from the virus, known as elephant endotheliotropic herpes virus.
FEATURES
By Buzz McClain, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
El Capitan is an intimidating granite formation in California's Yosemite National Park, popular with climbers because its 7,573-foot vertical face presents such a challenge. Pete Davis has done the four-night, five-day ascent twice, which is an accomplishment in itself. And he did it with one hand. The native of Phoenix in Baltimore County was born without an arm below the elbow, but as he shows in the short climbing film "The Gimp Monkeys," he'd rather have "one hand and a good attitude" than two hands and a bad outlook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland, For the Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
This week on "The Amazing Race" we see what happens when heat, stress and jet lag collide. Hint: it's a degree of crazy we've never seen before. But first, remember last week? All the teams were sliding into a manure pond in New Zealand. Then Phil told them that they were still racing. So no one's eliminated; quit worrying about Chuck. Strategy Team FaSon, Father with the blown Achilles and ankle boot, are doing another leg. They've been in the top three for three legs, so they figure, why not?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PUISSANT Even if you agree with the sort of people who adopted "cheese-eating surrender monkeys" from Willie of The Simpsons to refer to the French, you have to concede that a good deal of English comes from them, especially from those overbearing Normans of 1066 and thereafter.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary, in Woodstock, relies on the kindness of strangers. Strangers bring injured and abandoned animals to the 4-acre site, where they are sheltered and nursed to health. And strangers volunteer at the nonprofit organization, which has no paid staff. Heather Wandell has been volunteering at Frisky's since her son, now 22, spent a summer volunteering there before his sophomore year at Mt. Hebron High School. He moved on to other interests, but Wandell was hooked.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
MIAMI -- The woman on the phone was frantic. She'd jus seen five monkeys emerging from the smashed window of a neighbor's home. They'd been looting the house."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
If the much-contested fight over Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary takes any longer to resolve itself, the monkeys at the heart of the dispute might start evolving into higher primates. The Howard County Board of Appeals voted last night to delay its hearing on Frisky's after lawyers for Colleen Layton, owner of the Woodstock sanctuary, introduced a surprising new strategy designed to keep the center running. The lawyers told the board that the sanctuary is seeking a federal license as an "exhibitor" of monkeys, which could help Layton get around a county prohibition on keeping wild or exotic animals.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun in its recent editorial ("Government by referendum?" July 10) finally realized that the GOP, frustrated by its electoral failure to convince a majority of voters to support its candidates, has determined to throw a monkey wrench into the works of democracy and frustrate the constitutional will of the people, through what I more accurately called, "government by plebiscite. " Either we need to make referendums harder to get on the ballot, or we need to permit negative referendums, in which supporters of the law can block a referendum by gathering more signatures.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A colobus monkey was born in an exhibit Saturday at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore . Zoo officials did not know for certain that one of their female colobus monkeys, 14-year-old Keri, was pregnant, the zoo's general curator, Mike McClure, said in a statement. The monkeys are "secretive breeders," he said. The baby's father is 19-year-old Bisi, the zoo's only adult male colobus monkey. Zoo workers have not yet dertermined the baby's sex, he said. "We want the mother and baby to be as comfortable as possible, so we are not attempting to bring them off exhibit to check on the infant at this time," McClure said.
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