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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1997
Lots of reruns tonight, as networks gear up for the February sweeps. But surely, there must be something to watch."Coach" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- A boy playing with dolls? That's the situation when little Timothy is given a Princess Tiffany doll -- which surprisingly doesn't bother Coach Hayden. But it irritates the heck out of Luther, who thinks the boy needs more masculine toys. Oh, the dilemma. ABC."Great Performances" (9 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Don't miss this look at the career of songwriter-producer Arthur Freed, whose work at MGM produced one great movie musical after another, including "Singin' in the Rain," "Meet Me in St. Louis" and "On the Town."
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
This week 48 years ago, NBC boasted the first entire TV lineup in color, actor Ronald Regan was elected governor of California, John Lennon met Yoko Ono at an art gallery in London and the following songs were the most popular in the United States, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "I'm Your Puppet," James and Bobby Purify The million-selling "I'm Your Puppet" was the soul duo's biggest hit. By the way, their real names: James Purify and Robert Dickey.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
The question vexes and dogs the national conscience. In polite circles, the question is only whispered. But, more than ever, times call for boldness. Do the Monkees belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? If you go Davy Jones will perform at 4:30 p.m. (for all ages) and 7:30 p.m. (for ages 21 and up) tomorrow at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis, Tickets are $55. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadonstage.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Can this be the Golden Age of the Monkees? Rock's original manufactured group outsold the Beatles in 1967, and filled arenas in the 1980s. Reruns of their fondly remembered television show and the run of ridiculously catchy singles that accompanied it - “Last Train to Clarksville,” “I'm a Believer” and “Daydream Believer” among them - ensured a baseline level of popularity through the decades that followed. But the death last year of Davy Jones sent the albums back to the charts and helped to speed a reconsideration of the band's catalog and its enduring influence on the power-pop that followed.
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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
The first thing you have to do if you watched all 18 hours of "The Monkees" marathon on VH1 yesterday is examine your life.Am I eating right? Am I getting enough exercise? Is it finally time to put down the remote, get out of these Doritos-stained silk pajamas and find a job? These are all questions you want to ask yourself.You might also want to fax a question to VH1 executives, namely: Why now? Was a Monkees marathon something the country was clamoring for? Were there people at cocktail parties sipping Amstel Lights and raking a celery stick through the onion dip and wondering: "Whatever happened to Mickey Dolenz?
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON | December 25, 2005
Of all the character-building maxims that parents try to teach -- "waste not, want not," "practice makes perfect," etc. -- none is more initially incomprehensible than "it's better to give than to receive." Just try reasoning this out with a child younger than 10; you might as well be speaking Urdu. Yeah, right. And one scoop of ice cream is better than two. We're natural-born consumers. It's famously a challenge to wean a baby from the breast, even more so to convince a child that others have wants and needs, too. Learning to share is a shock, and my first jolt occurred on Christmas morning of 1966.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
This week 48 years ago, NBC boasted the first entire TV lineup in color, actor Ronald Regan was elected governor of California, John Lennon met Yoko Ono at an art gallery in London and the following songs were the most popular in the United States, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "I'm Your Puppet," James and Bobby Purify The million-selling "I'm Your Puppet" was the soul duo's biggest hit. By the way, their real names: James Purify and Robert Dickey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | July 3, 2003
NOW OR NEVER What's more in season than outdoor concerts and baseball? Check out the two combined at the Orioles 2003 Summer Concert Series, which offers free postgame concerts to fans who attended the game. The series has already brought such acts as Eddie Money and Joan Jett to the stage. Next up are: new country singer Joe Nichols on Sunday; Blood, Sweat & Tears on July 20; Christopher Cross on Aug. 3 and Ziggy Marley on Aug. 17. Tickets are available at the Orioles Box Office, through the Internet at www.theorioles.
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By (From the "Late Night with David Letterman" Book of Lists.) | July 8, 1992
10. To invent, perfect and mass produce the sneaker phone.9. So dogs and cats don't have to work for a living.8. To tremble at the terrible beauty of the stars, to shed a tear at the perfection of Beethoven's symphonies . . . and to crack a cold one now and then.7. To give the porpoises someone to feel superior to.6. To convert useless oxygen into valuable carbon dioxide.5. To provide cheap entertainment for the Neptunian Telescope People4. Lather, Rinse , Repeat.3. To purchase the fine books and magazines of Time Warner Inc.2.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
NBC has a pair of hilarious sitcom repeats, CBS has a magician with a talent that extends beyond his illusions, ABC has mom. You decide."The Story of Mothers and Daughters" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Mothers and daughters talk about each other and their effects on each other's lives. If you call your mom tonight and she's sobbing, you'll know why. The rest of us may find it all a bit much, but hey, my mom'll love it, and that makes it OK by me. ABC."The Magic of David Copperfield XVI: Unexplained Forces" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward G. Pickett and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 29, 2012
The Monkees came to town for a concert last night, and had 10,000 teeny-boppers swinging from the rafters. For an eternal hour, what are normally only a bunch of electronic particles on a television screen became oh so real to an enthusiastic, youthful, predominately female audience which turned the Civic Center into a temporary insane asylum. The turned-on generation turned out in force and fashion and did just what is normal for such occasions: screamed, applauded, cried, charged the stage and generally went hysterical.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
First Danielle Soibelman handed out green toy ears similar to those of the animated character Shrek, saying that she wanted each of the assembled students at the Glen Burnie Children's Guild looking "Shrekdafied. " Then the 11-year-old actress from Los Angeles, who plays young Fiona in "Shrek the Musical," offered a behind-the-scenes look at the production being performed at the Hippodrome through Sunday, April 3. She even showed the students a few choreographed moves from the musical about an ogre and his friends.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 7, 2010
When I sit down to write this weekly column, the first hilarious thing I do is open up the "Janet's World" template I've created on my computer and change the newspaper run-date in the "header" field. I'm sure you appreciate this fascinating window into the creative process. But when I did that today, I was transported for more than a few minutes. I could suddenly smell the hot slate of the front stoop where I sat most August nights waiting for the neighborhood kids to come out after dinner.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
The question vexes and dogs the national conscience. In polite circles, the question is only whispered. But, more than ever, times call for boldness. Do the Monkees belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? If you go Davy Jones will perform at 4:30 p.m. (for all ages) and 7:30 p.m. (for ages 21 and up) tomorrow at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis, Tickets are $55. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadonstage.com.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON | December 25, 2005
Of all the character-building maxims that parents try to teach -- "waste not, want not," "practice makes perfect," etc. -- none is more initially incomprehensible than "it's better to give than to receive." Just try reasoning this out with a child younger than 10; you might as well be speaking Urdu. Yeah, right. And one scoop of ice cream is better than two. We're natural-born consumers. It's famously a challenge to wean a baby from the breast, even more so to convince a child that others have wants and needs, too. Learning to share is a shock, and my first jolt occurred on Christmas morning of 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | July 3, 2003
NOW OR NEVER What's more in season than outdoor concerts and baseball? Check out the two combined at the Orioles 2003 Summer Concert Series, which offers free postgame concerts to fans who attended the game. The series has already brought such acts as Eddie Money and Joan Jett to the stage. Next up are: new country singer Joe Nichols on Sunday; Blood, Sweat & Tears on July 20; Christopher Cross on Aug. 3 and Ziggy Marley on Aug. 17. Tickets are available at the Orioles Box Office, through the Internet at www.theorioles.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 6, 2010
When I sit down to write this weekly column, the first hilarious thing I do is open up the "Janet's World" template I've created on my computer and change the newspaper run-date in the "header" field. I'm sure you appreciate this fascinating window into the creative process. But when I did that today, I was transported for more than a few minutes. I could suddenly smell the hot slate of the front stoop where I sat most August nights waiting for the neighborhood kids to come out after dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lou Carlozo and By Lou Carlozo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2001
In the first wave of recorded music, the goal was simple: Engineers sought to capture and reproduce live performances of musicians who worked years to hone their craft. Then came multitrack tape machines and the Beatles. In this second wave, the studio, much like an instrument, was used to bend sounds and fashion sonic backdrops impossible to re-create on a stage. But as you peel the plastic from your next new CD - whether by Britney Spears or Radiohead, Cher or Liz Phair - chances are, to revise the old ad slogan, it's neither live nor Memorex.
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