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Monica Coleman

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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
When Mary Barringer saw the old place in December, she felt proud.The brass was polished, the marble refinished. Murals spanned the walls. Red carpet covered the floor. Barringer had gone to work at 7 E. Redwood St. 36 years earlier, as a clerical worker for First National Bank of Maryland.Barringer, 67, marveled at how the building's lobby had been spiffed up by Monica Coleman, her stockbroker. Coleman had drafted a financial plan for Barringer in 1994, when Barringer was struggling with breast cancer, her husband's death and medical bills.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1999
The founder of the bankrupt investment firm Coleman Craten LLC emerged for the first time in federal bankruptcy court yesterday and said she has a plan to pay off creditors who are owed at least $5.9 million."
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
Coleman Craten LLC, the downtown brokerage and financial club that already is fighting a $431,000 suit filed by Charles Schwab, also faces allegations that Monica L. Coleman, a co-founder, defrauded a Howard County couple of nearly $800,000.Jean K. Aziz and Dr. Shahid Aziz contend in a lawsuit filed in Baltimore County Circuit Court that Coleman persuaded the couple to invest in a "family office" business that would offer wealthy investors "one-stop shopping" for a range of financial and professional services.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
Monica Coleman's dream was sold in dozens of pieces yesterday and carted out of a Pulaski Highway warehouse.Gone after an auction of Coleman Craten LLC's belongings were a 40-foot U-shaped mahogany bar, about 100 telephones, seven leather chairs, three leather sofas, 16 computers and an assortment of chairs, desks, tables and other computer equipment.When it was over, the auction had raised about $90,000 for the bankrupt company's creditors, a group including former employees, investors and unpaid contractors who are owed almost $6 million.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
The state securities division has expanded its investigation of Coleman Craten LLC to include the bank accounts of firm co-founder Monica L. Coleman's mother, husband and son, according to court records.Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan on Monday allowed the state to subpoena bank records of those family members without notifying them.That order came one week after Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said in a petition to the court that the division believes that Monica Coleman was "very likely" operating a Ponzi scheme through Coleman Craten LLC. He also said her husband and mother "were aware of her investment activities and participated in reassuring and lulling investors."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
Two sisters have filed a lawsuit against Monica L. Coleman, co-founder of the bankrupt downtown financial advisory firm of Coleman Craten LLC, alleging that she defrauded them of about $200,000 in retirement money.And a former bar owner, who closed her bar and restaurant to relocate it in the Coleman Craten Financial Club downtown, is suing Coleman, alleging that Coleman reneged on a promise to pay her $150,000, and failed to repay a debt of $39,000.In both lawsuits, Monica Coleman's husband, Richard A. Coleman Sr., is for the first time named as a co-defendant.
NEWS
By Kristi E. Swartz and Kristi E. Swartz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 5, 1997
Monica and Richard Coleman are helping Maryland Science Center visitors get a closer look at deep space.The Pasadena couple has donated $25,000 to renovate the center's rooftop observatory, which has been closed for almost 10 years."
NEWS
By Kristi E. Swartz and Kristi E. Swartz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 5, 1997
Monica and Richard Coleman are helping Maryland Science Center visitors get a closer look at deep space.The Pasadena couple has donated $25,000 to renovate the center's rooftop observatory, which has been closed for almost 10 years."
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has appointed a receiver to take over operation of Coleman Craten LLC after an elderly Towson couple accused the beleaguered downtown brokerage firm and its co-founder, Monica Coleman, of embezzling $2 million in their retirement funds.The judge issued the order Friday at the request of James R. and Carol J. Hyde of Towson, who had sought emergency action earlier that day.The order came less than an hour after Monica Coleman filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, which provides for the liquidation of assets, according to court documents that became available yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
In a move that appears to halt the investment operations of Coleman Craten LLC, the Maryland securities commissioner yesterday ordered the troubled financial advisory firm and its co-founder Monica L. Coleman to immediately stop selling securities and advising investors.Stating that Coleman and the firm committed fraud and violated Maryland securities laws, Commissioner Melanie Senter Lubin also is seeking to fine Coleman, revoke her license and permanently bar her from the industry."The whole purpose is to shut her down," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. "Ms. Coleman misrepresented the investments she sold -- and misled her clients.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
When Mary Barringer saw the old place in December, she felt proud.The brass was polished, the marble refinished. Murals spanned the walls. Red carpet covered the floor. Barringer had gone to work at 7 E. Redwood St. 36 years earlier, as a clerical worker for First National Bank of Maryland.Barringer, 67, marveled at how the building's lobby had been spiffed up by Monica Coleman, her stockbroker. Coleman had drafted a financial plan for Barringer in 1994, when Barringer was struggling with breast cancer, her husband's death and medical bills.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
Two sisters have filed a lawsuit against Monica L. Coleman, co-founder of the bankrupt downtown financial advisory firm of Coleman Craten LLC, alleging that she defrauded them of about $200,000 in retirement money.And a former bar owner, who closed her bar and restaurant to relocate it in the Coleman Craten Financial Club downtown, is suing Coleman, alleging that Coleman reneged on a promise to pay her $150,000, and failed to repay a debt of $39,000.In both lawsuits, Monica Coleman's husband, Richard A. Coleman Sr., is for the first time named as a co-defendant.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
The state securities division has expanded its investigation of Coleman Craten LLC to include the bank accounts of firm co-founder Monica L. Coleman's mother, husband and son, according to court records.Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan on Monday allowed the state to subpoena bank records of those family members without notifying them.That order came one week after Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said in a petition to the court that the division believes that Monica Coleman was "very likely" operating a Ponzi scheme through Coleman Craten LLC. He also said her husband and mother "were aware of her investment activities and participated in reassuring and lulling investors."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
In a move that appears to halt the investment operations of Coleman Craten LLC, the Maryland securities commissioner yesterday ordered the troubled financial advisory firm and its co-founder Monica L. Coleman to immediately stop selling securities and advising investors.Stating that Coleman and the firm committed fraud and violated Maryland securities laws, Commissioner Melanie Senter Lubin also is seeking to fine Coleman, revoke her license and permanently bar her from the industry."The whole purpose is to shut her down," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. "Ms. Coleman misrepresented the investments she sold -- and misled her clients.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has appointed a receiver to take over operation of Coleman Craten LLC after an elderly Towson couple accused the beleaguered downtown brokerage firm and its co-founder, Monica Coleman, of embezzling $2 million in their retirement funds.The judge issued the order Friday at the request of James R. and Carol J. Hyde of Towson, who had sought emergency action earlier that day.The order came less than an hour after Monica Coleman filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, which provides for the liquidation of assets, according to court documents that became available yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
ON A CHILLY Saturday evening in early December, Monica L. Coleman and John G. Craten threw a coming-out bash for their new financial services company.And what a party.Guests were serenaded by strolling violinists and handed champagne as they entered Coleman Craten LLC's lavishly renovated headquarters on a red carpet.Inside, they feasted on jumbo shrimp, caviar, oysters, roast beef and a sumptuous array of desserts. The brassy sound of big band music blared in the background as flappers danced, summoning images of the Roaring Twenties.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
Monica Coleman's dream was sold in dozens of pieces yesterday and carted out of a Pulaski Highway warehouse.Gone after an auction of Coleman Craten LLC's belongings were a 40-foot U-shaped mahogany bar, about 100 telephones, seven leather chairs, three leather sofas, 16 computers and an assortment of chairs, desks, tables and other computer equipment.When it was over, the auction had raised about $90,000 for the bankrupt company's creditors, a group including former employees, investors and unpaid contractors who are owed almost $6 million.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
ON A CHILLY Saturday evening in early December, Monica L. Coleman and John G. Craten threw a coming-out bash for their new financial services company.And what a party.Guests were serenaded by strolling violinists and handed champagne as they entered Coleman Craten LLC's lavishly renovated headquarters on a red carpet.Inside, they feasted on jumbo shrimp, caviar, oysters, roast beef and a sumptuous array of desserts. The brassy sound of big band music blared in the background as flappers danced, summoning images of the Roaring Twenties.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
Coleman Craten LLC, the downtown brokerage and financial club that already is fighting a $431,000 suit filed by Charles Schwab, also faces allegations that Monica L. Coleman, a co-founder, defrauded a Howard County couple of nearly $800,000.Jean K. Aziz and Dr. Shahid Aziz contend in a lawsuit filed in Baltimore County Circuit Court that Coleman persuaded the couple to invest in a "family office" business that would offer wealthy investors "one-stop shopping" for a range of financial and professional services.
NEWS
By Kristi E. Swartz and Kristi E. Swartz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 5, 1997
Monica and Richard Coleman are helping Maryland Science Center visitors get a closer look at deep space.The Pasadena couple has donated $25,000 to renovate the center's rooftop observatory, which has been closed for almost 10 years."
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