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By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 23, 1996
The adventuresome local company Mongrel Theatre will present "Judith" -- an original adaptation of the biblical story of the Israelite heroine who slew the Assyrian general Holofernes -- at the Theatre Project beginning Wednesday.Conceived and directed by Raine Bode with music by Bryan Snackie Hillman, "Judith" was created in collaboration with its six-member cast, who began working on the piece in February.Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, through June 9. Tickets are $14. Call (410)
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | April 20, 2007
Vacancy is a mangy-looking mongrel with a lot of familiar markings and a little more on the ball than you'd expect at first glance. Can a horror movie really get away with having so many familiar motifs such as its Motel in the Middle of Nowhere complete with creepy night manager (Frank Whaley) and support staff of hideously masked cutthroats? Not only does Vacancy get away with it, the movie executes its every borrowed, nerve-bruising plot twist with such gruesome efficiency that it makes you feel as grimy, wasted and worked-over as its prospective victims.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | April 20, 2007
Vacancy is a mangy-looking mongrel with a lot of familiar markings and a little more on the ball than you'd expect at first glance. Can a horror movie really get away with having so many familiar motifs such as its Motel in the Middle of Nowhere complete with creepy night manager (Frank Whaley) and support staff of hideously masked cutthroats? Not only does Vacancy get away with it, the movie executes its every borrowed, nerve-bruising plot twist with such gruesome efficiency that it makes you feel as grimy, wasted and worked-over as its prospective victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | July 29, 1994
Samuel Beckett frequently observed that the moment we are born we start to die. Human existence, in Beckett's view, amounts to finding ways to pass the time while proceeding from the cradle to the grave.It's not exactly a cheerful philosophy, but it's not totally despairing, either. The characters in his novels and plays voice their complaints with such vigor that we know they are very much alive in a world they cannot control or even understand. When their bodies wither away and they are reduced, in theatrical terms, to spotlighted talking lips, their voices keep going.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 1, 1993
An item in the "This Week" feature in Sunday's Arts and Entertainment section gave the wrong address for Artshowcase gallery. The correct address is 336 N. Charles St.The Sun regrets the errors.Admission to Mongrel Theatre's production of "The Firebugs" at the Merrick Barn at the Johns Hopkins University was incorrect in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section. Admission is $7 for the general public and $5 for students and seniors.The Sun regrets the error.Portrait of Hillary: The seat of power?
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | August 11, 1993
Arsonists are burning down the civilized world in Max Frisch's "The Firebugs: A Morality Without a Moral," but the playwright doesn't exactly single them out for blame. Their victims may also be guilty of a thing or two.This play has sometimes been interpreted as a specific political allegory, but it really has such a freewheeling allegorical spirit that we're encouraged to sort matters out for ourselves. After all, the setting is "western civilization now," rather than a particular country in a given year.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1995
Raoul Middleman, Mary Page Evans, Barbara Z. Lipman and Leonard Streckfus are among the artists who have donated works to next Sunday's WBAL Radio-Baltimore Sun auction to benefit Center Stage.Scheduled to run from 8 a.m. to midnight Feb. 26, the 18th annual auction presents opportunities to bid on roughly 750 items ranging from exotic foreign trips to lunches with local celebrities. Categories include travel, restaurants, household and kitchen items, beauty, sports equipment and hobbies, jewelry and gardening.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 12, 1995
"You mongrel Slavic swine," the cramped scribbling on the postcard began. "When are you going to apologize for wrongly blaming the Muslim world for the Oklahoma bombing? If the world ever goes to war, it will be because of pigs like you. I hope that you . . ."I couldn't make out what he hoped but I assume it wasn't pleasant. And his name appeared to be something like GlshF8rgh, but I can't be sure. That's usually the way it is with the names of those who use "mongrel Slavic swine" as a salutation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 23, 1996
The adventuresome local company Mongrel Theatre will present "Judith" -- an original adaptation of the biblical story of the Israelite heroine who slew the Assyrian general Holofernes -- at the Theatre Project beginning Wednesday.Conceived and directed by Raine Bode with music by Bryan Snackie Hillman, "Judith" was created in collaboration with its six-member cast, who began working on the piece in February.Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, through June 9. Tickets are $14. Call (410)
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | August 30, 1995
ORLANDO, Fla. -- The 1996 U.S. presidential election is more than a year away, but already the names of hopeful candidates are becoming household words: Dole, Gramm, Bradley, Josh the Wonder Dog . . .Josh the Wonder Dog?The Pasadena, Md., mutt is one of 173 office-seekers who have officially filed to run for the country's top job. The list includes mainstream and obscure candidates, from the head of the Prohibitionist Party to north Florida developer Charles Collins, who is hoping to become the next Ross Perot.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 12, 1995
"You mongrel Slavic swine," the cramped scribbling on the postcard began. "When are you going to apologize for wrongly blaming the Muslim world for the Oklahoma bombing? If the world ever goes to war, it will be because of pigs like you. I hope that you . . ."I couldn't make out what he hoped but I assume it wasn't pleasant. And his name appeared to be something like GlshF8rgh, but I can't be sure. That's usually the way it is with the names of those who use "mongrel Slavic swine" as a salutation.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1995
Raoul Middleman, Mary Page Evans, Barbara Z. Lipman and Leonard Streckfus are among the artists who have donated works to next Sunday's WBAL Radio-Baltimore Sun auction to benefit Center Stage.Scheduled to run from 8 a.m. to midnight Feb. 26, the 18th annual auction presents opportunities to bid on roughly 750 items ranging from exotic foreign trips to lunches with local celebrities. Categories include travel, restaurants, household and kitchen items, beauty, sports equipment and hobbies, jewelry and gardening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | July 29, 1994
Samuel Beckett frequently observed that the moment we are born we start to die. Human existence, in Beckett's view, amounts to finding ways to pass the time while proceeding from the cradle to the grave.It's not exactly a cheerful philosophy, but it's not totally despairing, either. The characters in his novels and plays voice their complaints with such vigor that we know they are very much alive in a world they cannot control or even understand. When their bodies wither away and they are reduced, in theatrical terms, to spotlighted talking lips, their voices keep going.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | August 11, 1993
Arsonists are burning down the civilized world in Max Frisch's "The Firebugs: A Morality Without a Moral," but the playwright doesn't exactly single them out for blame. Their victims may also be guilty of a thing or two.This play has sometimes been interpreted as a specific political allegory, but it really has such a freewheeling allegorical spirit that we're encouraged to sort matters out for ourselves. After all, the setting is "western civilization now," rather than a particular country in a given year.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | August 30, 1995
ORLANDO, Fla. -- The 1996 U.S. presidential election is more than a year away, but already the names of hopeful candidates are becoming household words: Dole, Gramm, Bradley, Josh the Wonder Dog . . .Josh the Wonder Dog?The Pasadena, Md., mutt is one of 173 office-seekers who have officially filed to run for the country's top job. The list includes mainstream and obscure candidates, from the head of the Prohibitionist Party to north Florida developer Charles Collins, who is hoping to become the next Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Caroline Seebohm | June 21, 1991
THE visitor to America's suburban gardens during this year's blooming season might notice a disturbing phenomenon.Many of these back yards seem colorful, but isn't there something oddly similar about their colors?Isn't it strange that in garden after garden the rows of peonies always include three identical colors -- white, pink and dark red?Isn't it odd that along the driveways and rockeries, clumps of similar pink, mauve and white creeping phlox are in flower?Do our eyes deceive us, or is that rather dull pink rose growing in hedge-like profusion exactly the same rather dull pink rose planted in an identical row along almost every fence in the neighborhood?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 1, 1993
An item in the "This Week" feature in Sunday's Arts and Entertainment section gave the wrong address for Artshowcase gallery. The correct address is 336 N. Charles St.The Sun regrets the errors.Admission to Mongrel Theatre's production of "The Firebugs" at the Merrick Barn at the Johns Hopkins University was incorrect in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section. Admission is $7 for the general public and $5 for students and seniors.The Sun regrets the error.Portrait of Hillary: The seat of power?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 10, 1993
They don't receive star billing, but they steal the show every night.That's quite an accomplishment since, compared to the bevy of long-legged chorus girls in "The Will Rogers Follies," these cast members are real dogs.REAL dogs. Eight of them: Buster, Corky, Penny, Lady, Louie, Tom, Queen and Shaggy.Collectively, they are known as the Amazing Mongrels, and they are owned and trained by Bob and Jeanne Moore of Bloomington, Calif.The Moores adopted all of their performing pooches from pounds and trained them to be the show-biz sensations they are today, touring the country in the Wild West Show segment of the Tony Award-winning "Will Rogers Follies," which continues its run at the Lyric Opera Housethrough May 23.The canine cast members jump rope, steal Bob's cowboy hat, stand on their hind legs on a suspended rope, and leap through barrels -- all with obvious tail-wagging glee.
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